or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › Why do people homeschool?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why do people homeschool?

post #1 of 253
Thread Starter 
Why do people choose to homeschool?
I guess I just don't understand how a child can receive the same amount of information/knowledge at home given by 1 parent as he can get from school with a number of teachers + through interaction/projects done together with a group of other students.

I understand that a parent (who is not a teacher) has enough knowledge to homeschool a young child...but how about older children? Does the parent really know all about physics, chemistry, geography, art and everything else to provide a good enough guidance to a child? So, even through homeschooling the child will have enough skills to go to university and do well there?

I am not planning to start a war here. Just trying to understand the logic behind such a choice (it looks like so many people want to homeschool here but are unable to do so for financial/other reasons).

Also, what is so bad about public/private schools? Sorry, just trying to understand.
post #2 of 253
Have you read the threads in the homeschooling forum? They pretty much answer any question you might have. I suggest taking a nice long trip over there and just peruse the threads.
post #3 of 253
Oh boy...:
post #4 of 253
Here it is in a nutshell:

You don't have to know everything about all subjects. You just have to know how to find the information.

I have this thing called the internet. I can also drive to the public library. Some people even purchase textbooks adn curriculum guides.

Besides, if you can't remember anything you learned in high school, why is it so important to teach to your kids?
post #5 of 253
I'm homeschooling 2 teenagers and they're doing all the subjects they would do in a regular school. What, like it's hard??
post #6 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&IsMama View Post
Oh boy...:
:
post #7 of 253
Ruth
post #8 of 253
T - 10, 9, 8, 7, 6.....
post #9 of 253
Pass the popcorn. I'll watch too. :
post #10 of 253
There's nothing wrong with Public/Private school if it's what works for your family.

Give yourself more credit...if you can read, you can learn all of those things. If your children can read, they can learn all of those things. All it takes is a spark of interest and the resources, which are widely available.

Peace and Love
Lisa
post #11 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
I understand that a parent (who is not a teacher) has enough knowledge to homeschool a young child...but how about older children? Does the parent really know all about physics, chemistry, geography, art and everything else to provide a good enough guidance to a child? So, even through homeschooling the child will have enough skills to go to university and do well there?
You got through high school didn't you? Then you should be smart enough (with the help of a good book) to guide your child through it too. Simple as that.
I was homeschooled for 13 years. I went to college, was accepted on an academic scholarship to my choice school. I had great grades in everything, writing, literature, math, chemistry, geography, till I got stuck with some really crappy roommates that never let me get any sleep. Homeschoolers tend to have better self-motivated study habits so they tend to do better in college.

There are many many reasons that people choose to homeschool.
Personally I believe that there is so much more crutial information and everyday "stuff" that needs to be learned that can not be taught in an environment away from everyday life. Who is gonna teach your kid to fix the toilet, change a tire, fix the car, cook meals, fix the leaky sink, paint the house, roof a house, retreive a lost ring from a bathroom drain, etc.?? The list could go on and on. Children who are gone to school all day don't get near as many opportunities to learn those things. It's a personal decision. Not everybody values those skills I mentioned, but ya know what? I could live every day of my life without knowing advanced chemistry or physics, without reading 'great literature' but I really need to know those other things in order to live a self supportive lifestyle.
post #12 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post

Besides, if you can't remember anything you learned in high school, why is it so important to teach to your kids?

:

That was my first thought. I can't remember half of what I learned in high school. Most of what I learned in college was taught in college...it didn't really build on the things that I learned in high school. Maybe a small bit.

I'm more of a fan of learning useful things that are pertinent to the real world and things that you need/do everyday. Everything else can be read about on the internet/in the library. There is really no need to test for rote memorization in history and things like that...reading about it seems like it would be enough.

I think paying attention to what the child/teen wants to learn about is key. I'm not such a fan of having things that really don't interest my kids or is not applicable to everyday living forced on them. I am lucky that we have a really good school that pays attention to these type of things.
post #13 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
Here it is in a nutshell:

You don't have to know everything about all subjects. You just have to know how to find the information.

I have this thing called the internet. I can also drive to the public library. Some people even purchase textbooks adn curriculum guides.

Besides, if you can't remember anything you learned in high school, why is it so important to teach to your kids?
I know plenty of teachers who teach subjects which they know nothing about (i.e. my friend is a hs math teacher, but they needed someone to teach an 11th grade english class, so she's doing it. She has no clue about anything she's teaching, she just reads the teachers guide and goes straight from that - which is what all elementry school teachers do, too). Just b/c someone is a teacher doesn't mean they know everything there is to know on the subject.


I can't wait to see how this thread turns out.
post #14 of 253
Just because, that's why.
post #15 of 253
I completely understand homeschooling, but I don't understand "unschooling." :
post #16 of 253
I wouldn't give much thought about how the thread turns out...instead I will set up a betting pool on how long before the sucker gets locked!

OK so who wants in? 12am EST? 1 am EST? Before I get this posted?
post #17 of 253
You don't know what unschooling is? Or you don't understand the decision to choose it?
post #18 of 253
:
post #19 of 253
Coincidentally, there's a long thread about that currently going on in the homeschooling forum:

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=675095
post #20 of 253
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneKnight View Post
You got through high school didn't you? Then you should be smart enough (with the help of a good book) to guide your child through it too. Simple as that.
I was homeschooled for 13 years. I went to college, was accepted on an academic scholarship to my choice school. I had great grades in everything, writing, literature, math, chemistry, geography, till I got stuck with some really crappy roommates that never let me get any sleep. Homeschoolers tend to have better self-motivated study habits so they tend to do better in college.

There are many many reasons that people choose to homeschool.
Personally I believe that there is so much more crutial information and everyday "stuff" that needs to be learned that can not be taught in an environment away from everyday life. Who is gonna teach your kid to fix the toilet, change a tire, fix the car, cook meals, fix the leaky sink, paint the house, roof a house, retreive a lost ring from a bathroom drain, etc.?? The list could go on and on. Children who are gone to school all day don't get near as many opportunities to learn those things. It's a personal decision. Not everybody values those skills I mentioned, but ya know what? I could live every day of my life without knowing advanced chemistry or physics, without reading 'great literature' but I really need to know those other things in order to live a self supportive lifestyle.
Thank you for your reply. It does answer my questions.
The only thing though, for me personally, getting through high school and being 'smart enough' has nothing to do with being a good teacher to a child.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at Home and Beyond
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at Home and Beyond › Why do people homeschool?