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Why do people homeschool? - Page 8

post #141 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
Thank you all for your answers. I do have a better idea about homeschooling now.

One last point though. A number of you stated that kids really don't need to sit in classes to learn. Kids really don't need teachers as teachers and they can learn all the material (including not-so-basic math) on their own just by reading the textbooks, searching the internet, etc.

Many of you also stated that it is not that hard to homeschool older kids because even if you don't know something (eg. physics) yourself, all you have to do is find the info for the child or help your child find that info on his own.

So, if that's your view, then how come after 10-12+ years of homeschooling....your kids (at least some of your kids) end up going to colleges? Wouldn't it be easier for them (as well as less expensive) to learn all of those things on their own at home? After all, they can buy the same textbooks as they get in colleges/universities. Also, after 10+ years of homeschooling, they should really be active experienced learners who (I think) could learn everything without anyone else's help just by "living it". As many of you said, there is also no real value to group work. So, why after all those 10+ years of "homeschooling freedom" instead of "institutional environment in a classroom", your kids end up going to that "institutional environment" anyway. In that institutional environment they might not be the brightest (and it will lower their self esteem), they would have to learn at the same pace as everyone else...they would have to sit in the classroom and do homework and prepare for tests after school...so why go for it?
No offense but have you done ANY research at all about homeschoolers and college? You realize there are many top notch colleges out there who actively recruit homeschooled students because they do VERY WELL in college?
post #142 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M
Ok, but aren't there some things that you can't learn by "living it?"
Unschooling doesn't mean you can only learn things that come up in everyday life. It means you learn in a way that is individually tailored to your needs, by your choice, according to your interest and desire, and when you are ready, which is something only you can know.

Quote:
Can you really learn all the algebra and geometry by "living it?", or you just don't think that your kids need it and knowing how to fix a leaking toilet is more important for them since this skill will be useful in life?
Do you really believe that algebra and geometry never come into real life? That they're entirely academic? What would be the point in learning them (and for them to exist at all for that matter) if they had no actual use?

Quote:
What if your dc decides that he wants to have a career in a math-related field? Can he really do that if you only expose him/her to things that he/she can "live" in?
Of course they can. When my boys were first starting to get interested in math, they would for instance observe how fast I was going and how far from home we were and wonder how long it would take us to get there. This is an algebraic problem. A while ago I painted a many-pointed star on our dining room ceiling above the pendant lamp, and wanted the points to all be the same size. Type of math used? Geometry. Now, a person can get along perfectly well in life without understanding anything of algebra or geometry, and most people do. The point I'm trying to make is simply that there are many opportunities, if one is interested in looking for them and exposing them, in which to learn about math in an active, real-life way. It's a much better way to start out with math, actually, because it helps you develop an intuitive base. So many people think they aren't good at math because the way in which it's presented is too abstract for their brains to catch hold of it. There is a place for abstract math, but in general the value and use of math isn't totally abstract, so it's absurd to approach it that way from the outset.

And what if my child does want a career in math? Assuming that one who wants a career in math is also someone who is mathematically inclined, it's ridiculous, given the richness of resources in this modern world, to assume that the the absence of school structure matters in the slightest. If my child has an aptitude and desire to go into a math-related field, his ability to do so is not going to hinge on what I teach him. He has a brain; he has my support; he has resources. He is going to be drawn to it, seek it out, and it will be right there for him to find when he's ready, and he will do it. How many parents have stood by befuddled while their children with high aptitudes for computer theory started programming all on their own? Heck, I don't even know how to navigate my way through our satellite channels and my (grade school age) kids are programming the damn thing. My son taught himself how to use Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, fairly complex programs, when he was nine. He put the effort into it because he was interested, not because I said, "hey, you'd better learn this if you ever want to get into graphic design!" And trust me, he's not a genius, just a regular kid. If you're shocked by something like that, then you totally underestimate the power of the natural (not coerced) human drive and ability to seek out information.
post #143 of 253

new question for homeschool moms

Without starting a war, of course, I would like to ask all the homeschool moms here a question as well:

have you ever posted on the school forum, without any intention of sending your kids to ps, to question their parenting choice(without ANY knowledge of public schooling)? I looked it over and couldn't find any such thread. Please correct me if I missed it.

That is why I homeschool, to answer the original question. The mentality that everyone has to do the exact same thing can clearly affect a person from public school all the way into adulthood.
post #144 of 253
Quote:
have you ever posted on the school forum, without any intention of sending your kids to ps, to question their parenting choice
No and it wouldn't even occur to me to do so.
post #145 of 253
Great point smocklets....
Let me jump on my soap box for a moment

We are conditioned to accept what is "main stream" without questioning be it
public school, vaccinations, circumcision, eating chemical laden over processed foods etc.
If a child is adversely affected by any of those things then the child must be defective, not the system. The child needs to be fixed, not the system. The child needs to adapt to the system, the system should not adapt to the child etc.

I think there is something wrong with such "conditioning" and I am really tired of being labeled a freak, outcast etc for questioning the system.
post #146 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by smocklets View Post
Without starting a war, of course, I would like to ask all the homeschool moms here a question as well:

have you ever posted on the school forum, without any intention of sending your kids to ps, to question their parenting choice(without ANY knowledge of public schooling)? I looked it over and couldn't find any such thread. Please correct me if I missed it.

That is why I homeschool, to answer the original question. The mentality that everyone has to do the exact same thing can clearly affect a person from public school all the way into adulthood.
Nope. I never have. I have also never questioned anyone's decision in my real life to send their kids to public school. I have not been afforded the same courtesy. I have had people assume that I am just letting Joe wither away because we don't have a structure to our day...

Oh well. I am glad to be able to tell people how wonderful homeschooling is. Most anyone I know whose kids are in public school has experienced a moment or two of doubt or regret, or has had issues with the school clashing with their feelings or beliefs etc. NEVER for a moment have I regretted my decision to homeschool my son- & that is the best feeling in the world!
post #147 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
We are conditioned to accept what is "main stream" without questioning be it
public school, vaccinations, circumcision, eating chemical laden over processed foods etc.
If a child is adversely affected by any of those things then the child must be defective, not the system. The child needs to be fixed, not the system. The child needs to adapt to the system, the system should not adapt to the child etc.
That is brilliant & oh so true... like I said before, I saw the way school changed my nephews. Nothing HUGE, & they are still great kids- but they lost a certain spark. I like Joe's spark, ya know? I want it to remain lit!

(I had to run by my nephew's school last year to drop off a change of clothes, & he looked so sad & unlike himself- he had a mosquito bite on his head & I told the secretary he had bad reactions to bug bites & signed him out & took him home. : I couldn't help it!! He DOES have bad reactions to bug bites, but I think I would have tried to spring him anyway LOL. It just happened. My sister was none too pleased!)
post #148 of 253
I was a ps student from age 4 to high school. College was a very different environment for me. It was the first time I woke up and enjoyed learning.
Learning in college IMO is much more like homeschooling than a ps situation.
I was not stuck at the same pace as other students because there was no one level. I didn't even have to take some classes because of my high test scores. I had a few classes with 1 or 2 other students. I had independent projects often.

One former homeschool student I knew in college did better than most students. He had no trouble fitting in to the environment or with his self esteem. He was a leader on campus in many activities.

I'm not sure I understand the concern about a homeschool student not being the brightest in the class anymore. That is an institutional school mentality. I think a lot of us homeschooling are not concerned a great deal about grades/testing but focus on knowledge/skills acquired. I don't expect my dd will be crushed by not being the highest grade earner in a class if I have not drilled her constantly for 10+ years to measure her self-worth on attaining a certain grade.

My dd may not choose to go to a 4 year college. If she does I am sure she will be just fine.
post #149 of 253
By the way, the first thing that made me think seriously about homeschooling my kids was taking a biology class in college with a girl I knew from youth orchestra in high school, who had been homeschooled. There were 400 people in this zoology class and it was known to be the "hard" class to fulfill the biology basic requirement, so out of the 400 students, at least 380 were in pre-med or a science-related field. I was in history; she was in music. I just thought it sounded more interesting than botany.

Now, I was the kind of student who got straight A's without ever studying or doing my homework at home (why bother, when you can do it during class while you're ignoring the teacher?). I set a school record on the PSAT in 9th grade when I was taking it just for fun. But I worked my ass off to get a 91 in that zoology class. I went to every class, took notes, studied before every exam. And my homeschooled friend? She maintained an average of about 98.

That was the first thing that made me go, "hm ... "
post #150 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
Great point smocklets....
Let me jump on my soap box for a moment

We are conditioned to accept what is "main stream" without questioning be it
public school, vaccinations, circumcision, eating chemical laden over processed foods etc.
If a child is adversely affected by any of those things then the child must be defective, not the system. The child needs to be fixed, not the system. The child needs to adapt to the system, the system should not adapt to the child etc.

I think there is something wrong with such "conditioning" and I am really tired of being labeled a freak, outcast etc for questioning the system.
post #151 of 253
wow, I guess I should always drink a pina-colada before posting

Seriously... Thanks for getting what I was saying. It's been a tough week and I am just so sick and fed up with people who act like making different choices equals making bad choices
post #152 of 253
I am just starting to homeschool but unlike most, I dont really want my kids to go to college and spend a huge amount of money on a degree that wont be able to get them a job when they get out.
And I havent read this whole thread, but we go to a homeschool coop, where my kids do do group activities; not to mention playgroups and homeschooling classes at museums and such. A few things I dont like about public schools are the foods they serve, the kids constantly being put on meds for ADD or something else, the shootings, and the twisted history books, the bullying and much more.
post #153 of 253
That is a good question, though...













brb.
post #154 of 253
Let's see.... if the OP stated-

"Why do people choose to send their kids away to school?
I guess I just don't understand how a child can receive the same amount of love/personal attention/tutoring at school given by people who do not know them as he can get from his own parents + through interaction/projects done together with a group of other students.

blah blah blah

I am not planning to start a war here. Just trying to understand the logic behind such a choice...."
post #155 of 253
ok, now I've read the whole thread.
post #156 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunanthem View Post
ok, now I've read the whole thread.


So what do ya' think?
post #157 of 253
Really, I think people dont realize that with homeschooling you arent the only teacher for the whole time your children learn at home. We have many adults who influence our kids lives... there are just sooo many resources with homeschooling, so many ways you can vary your approach to suit your child and family; so many oppurtunities for learning out there.

I dont think kids get alot of art in school; they are cutting alot of those programs out; where as there are plenty of ways to introduce art to your kids.

And if we look at how our society and world around us is now, and we dont like how it is and what we see... why would we repeat the same education for our children if we want to see change for the future?
post #158 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by joesmom View Post
That is brilliant & oh so true... like I said before, I saw the way school changed my nephews. Nothing HUGE, & they are still great kids- but they lost a certain spark. I like Joe's spark, ya know? I want it to remain lit!

(I had to run by my nephew's school last year to drop off a change of clothes, & he looked so sad & unlike himself- he had a mosquito bite on his head & I told the secretary he had bad reactions to bug bites & signed him out & took him home. : I couldn't help it!! He DOES have bad reactions to bug bites, but I think I would have tried to spring him anyway LOL. It just happened. My sister was none too pleased!)
Awww.


This is a great thread. It reminds me of all of the different and valid reasons we choose this path for ourselves and our children. I am so grateful to have this forum for support and encouragement.
post #159 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunanthem View Post
Really, I think people dont realize that with homeschooling you arent the only teacher for the whole time your children learn at home. We have many adults who influence our kids lives... there are just sooo many resources with homeschooling, so many ways you can vary your approach to suit your child and family; so many oppurtunities for learning out there.
This is so true, isn't it? My son was interested in electricity (yet another thing he wouldn't learn in public elementary). We did a variety of things, including reading books and using snap circuits. But my father works with electronics in his job; he's a technician. So my father happily talked to my son about what he did in his job and he gave him a circuit board that he had made in a training session. Ironically, my father is one of the people in my life who is critical of homeschooling. He is one who would say, "but they only have one teacher!" We, of course, don't see it that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunanthem View Post
I dont think kids get alot of art in school; they are cutting alot of those programs out; where as there are plenty of ways to introduce art to your kids.
I missed the reference to art in the OP. I'm not an artist but this is an area that the kids and I are passionate about. And it's so EASY to get involved. I have found that we are easily able to do much more with art at home than the kids would ever get in elementary school. First of all, art for children is largely exploration and exposure to techniques. It's fun and easy to introduce pointillism, cubism, and monotypes to kids. There are so many painting techniques and styles that seem to naturally appeal to children (like cubism).

We visit our local art museum on a monthly basis. Because the kids are not in school, we have ample time to do this and there is no obligation (i.e. "there will be a quiz...") to suck the joy out of the experience. We've seen a wide variety of artistic styles in the museum. Sometimes, it's as simple as reading the card and saying, "This is an oil painting. Do you see how the paint looks thick and literally sticks out on the canvas? The artist did that on purpose. It's one way of using this kind of paint. What do you think? Do you like it?" The most meaningful thing I can say to my kids in the art museum is, "What do you think it looks like?" Kids will really surprise you with their observations and interpretations. And with art, there really is no wrong answer in interpretation. I've had a 2 year old tell me some obscure sculpture was an airplane. His interpretation was not wrong and he was developing a sense of critical thinking and imagination in just answering, "What do you think it is?"

I see the school field trips come through the art museum periodically. My kids get annoyed and shush them. It seems nearly impossible to enjoy the art while being in the midst of all that cacophony! And there's peer pressure to laugh at the art and be cool. I don't think they're getting nearly as much out of their experience and they are only taken once in the entire year.

I had no idea what a monotype was until we found a handout in the art museum in our favorite section. My son wanted me to read it to him. When we got home and got out paints, he painted some tissue paper and used it to stamp designs on his paper: a monotype. It's so easy to try things! Edited to add: I might be using the wrong word here. I don't know where his art hand-out is. There's one method that involves painting on glass to stamp and another that involves painting on paper to stamp. Anyway, you get the idea...

There are many wonderful books on art for children. We own an Usborne one that is good. The books use simple language to describe the difference between surrealism, cubism, impressionism, whatever. I've found that it's easy for me to learn along with them. Our local kindergarten (or first grade) would not even begin to scratch the surface of what we've done.

My older son has taken art classes from time to time. They're scheduled at times when the kids are out of school, but it's still very easy and inexpensive for a homeschooler to take a formal art class. He took watercolor painting and clay. He greatly enjoyed both. There's nothing that says a homeschooler can't take a local class.

From what my sister tells me, "art" in school is still limited to every child copying something that teacher has made in a prescribed time period. I see the local school art hanging on the art center wells. While I am sometimes taken with a particular painting, my sense of "Wow" goes away when I turn the corner to find 10 other absolutely identical paintings. I realize there is value in copying the work of others. My son learned and honed several watercolor painting techniques by doing just this. But there is a time for free art and I don't see this in our local schools.

Anyway, that's my long-winded way of saying that art is very easy to "do" in a homeschooling family and that our local schools do a very poor job with it.
post #160 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M

So, if that's your view, then how come after 10-12+ years of homeschooling....your kids (at least some of your kids) end up going to colleges? Wouldn't it be easier for them (as well as less expensive) to learn all of those things on their own at home?
It's all about choice and personal control. If my children want to go to college, they can choose the college, choose the program, choose the professors, etc. etc. As others have said, college is very different from earlier school. They might just want the experience, or they might need the degree in order to do the work they want to do. Either way, college would be a means to meet the goals that the kids set for themselves. K-12 is one size fits all and the kids have virtually no input in their education.


Quote:
So, why after all those 10+ years of "homeschooling freedom" instead of "institutional environment in a classroom", your kids end up going to that "institutional environment" anyway.
Why sacrifice 10-12+ years of freedom in their childhood years simply because they might go to 4+ years of college as adults?
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