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Why do people homeschool? - Page 2

post #21 of 253
Well, I can't speak to why other people chose to homeschool. It is what felt right for OUR family. My husband and I both work mids (my mom lives with us). Last year I worked noon-10 pm and husband worked mids. We wouldn't have seen the kids too much if they were in school. Also, my daughter is "behind" one year in math and way ahead in reading. With homeschooling she can work at her own pace. I don't think that where you are in third grade math is indicative of your worth as a person. When I was in public school a lot seemed to ride on that, imho, on your "rank" in the group. I didn't care for that.
post #22 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
Here it is in a nutshell:

You don't have to know everything about all subjects. You just have to know how to find the information.

I have this thing called the internet. I can also drive to the public library. Some people even purchase textbooks adn curriculum guides.

Besides, if you can't remember anything you learned in high school, why is it so important to teach to your kids?

and my reasons are similar to all the others listed already. nak
post #23 of 253
Quote:
Why do people choose to homeschool?
I guess I just don't understand how a child can receive the same amount of information/knowledge at home given by 1 parent as he can get from school with a number of teachers + through interaction/projects done together with a group of other students.
I'm a former teacher and my husband is still teaching. Our experience showed us that we didn't understand how an education contained within four walls, too frequently driven by a test-based curriculum, could offer our children nearly as much as the world without those barriers.

They are immersed in learning; they touch it, feel it, smell it. We are surrounded by state parks; the Smithsonian is an hour away by Metro, far less if we want to drive into DC. My kids can see the Capitol; it's real to them so Civics is real. My 7-year-old can identify the three branches of government and how they check each other--not because we sat down with a textbook and a workpacket, but because, when we're in DC, he asks questions. My 12-year-old understands it at a greater depth. My 4-year-old listens and absorbs.

We, my husband and I, know firsthand the limitations of the public school system. We know how much time is spent on classroom management, on testing, on test-based instruction. We know how much is possible when you have 25+ students in one classroom. And, for us, homeschooling (closer even to unschooling, really) was the only option that made sense.
post #24 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
Thank you for your reply. It does answer my questions.
The only thing though, for me personally, getting through high school and being 'smart enough' has nothing to do with being a good teacher to a child.
No it doesn't. A good teacher is someone that is personally invested in the success of the student and cares about how their life turns out. Who could do that better than a parent?
post #25 of 253
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
Here it is in a nutshell:

You don't have to know everything about all subjects. You just have to know how to find the information.

I have this thing called the internet. I can also drive to the public library. Some people even purchase textbooks adn curriculum guides.

Besides, if you can't remember anything you learned in high school, why is it so important to teach to your kids?

Thanks Ruthla. Just wanted to say that as odd as it may sound, I do remember most of the stuff from high school. I think it is important for kids to learn all that stuff too so that they can later choose for themselves whether they want to pursue a career based on the things they learned in high school. If they won't learn all those physics, and arts, they might not even know that's something that's of interest to them.

However, as I answered to another poster, remembering my highschool stuff and being smart does not equal being a good teacher. I am a good student but I am not a good teacher.
post #26 of 253
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rach View Post
Just because, that's why.
Very informative.
post #27 of 253
I understand your question, OP about "how can a parent effectively teach high school subjects?". I was VERY skeptical about homeschooling........until I tried it. I, for one, do not plan to teach her high school. We plan to "homeschool" formally up to tenth grade and then dual enrollment and have her take college classes at that point. That way she will graduate from high school with roughly half of her college classes DONE! I think it is absurd to take (for instance):

English I & II

History I & II

Government

Biology

Chemistry

etc, etc, etc. in high school then turn around and take it all over again in college. It is essentially the same material, they just ever so slightly increase the workload in college.
post #28 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
The only thing though, for me personally, getting through high school and being 'smart enough' has nothing to do with being a good teacher to a child.
So, what do you think makes a "good teacher" ?
post #29 of 253
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy View Post
I'm a former teacher and my husband is still teaching. Our experience showed us that we didn't understand how an education contained within four walls, too frequently driven by a test-based curriculum, could offer our children nearly as much as the world without those barriers.

They are immersed in learning; they touch it, feel it, smell it. We are surrounded by state parks; the Smithsonian is an hour away by Metro, far less if we want to drive into DC. My kids can see the Capitol; it's real to them so Civics is real. My 7-year-old can identify the three branches of government and how they check each other--not because we sat down with a textbook and a workpacket, but because, when we're in DC, he asks questions. My 12-year-old understands it at a greater depth. My 4-year-old listens and absorbs.

We, my husband and I, know firsthand the limitations of the public school system. We know how much time is spent on classroom management, on testing, on test-based instruction. We know how much is possible when you have 25+ students in one classroom. And, for us, homeschooling (closer even to unschooling, really) was the only option that made sense.
Wow. I guess I never thought about all that from your perspective. Thanks.
post #30 of 253
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&IsMama View Post
So, what do you think makes a "good teacher" ?
Hm, I don't know. I know that I am good at what I do and my dh is good at what he does at work. I am assuming that at least some percentage of teachers should be enjoying their work (for whatever reason they wanted to become teachers afterall) and over the years developed the necessary skills to explain things well and get students interested in their class. I know there are bad teachers too (and trust me, I've seen quite a few of those) but still, I remember a number of great and good teachers that I had and I do know that I would never be one of them.

Now, I really like my dd teacher. She is great with the kids and my dd loves school and can't wait till the morning to go back.
post #31 of 253
I knew when I was in high school that my children would be homeschooled. I homeschooled myself, no help from my parents at all, for grades 10-12, it took me 6 months. I was in college full time shortly after my 16th B-Day.

DH was gifted as a child, he tested out to skip two grades in middle school, but knows nothing, has never read a book, he knew how to beat the system.


School has it's place, but who better to teach your child then the parent who knows them, knows how they respond, how they learn. Learning doesn't need to be in a classroom. Life is learning, we learn everyday, so do they.
post #32 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
Thank you for your reply. It does answer my questions.
The only thing though, for me personally, getting through high school and being 'smart enough' has nothing to do with being a good teacher to a child.
If you are smart enough, but you don't feel that you are good at teaching it to someone else then you probably have your answer. If you aren't comfortable with teaching then perhaps having someone else do it is the "right" choice for YOU.
post #33 of 253
Because schools are not god and are not the be all, end all, of education. Far better to prepare for "life" by living it, not stuck in a room with a bunch of other kids, bored.
post #34 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthea™ View Post
Because schools are not god and are not the be all, end all, of education. Far better to prepare for "life" by living it, not stuck in a room with a bunch of other kids, bored.
post #35 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arduinna View Post
You don't know what unschooling is? Or you don't understand the decision to choose it?
The decision to choose it.
post #36 of 253
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthea™ View Post
Because schools are not god and are not the be all, end all, of education. Far better to prepare for "life" by living it, not stuck in a room with a bunch of other kids, bored.
Ok, but aren't there some things that you can't learn by "living it?". How about some not-so-basic math? Can you really learn all the algebra and geometry by "living it?", or you just don't think that your kids need it and knowing how to fix a leaking toilet is more important for them since this skill will be useful in life?

What if your dc decides that he wants to have a career in a math-related field? Can he really do that if you only expose him/her to things that he/she can "live" in?
post #37 of 253
And don't forget the favorite "socialization" issue, folks!
post #38 of 253
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for your answers. I will check this thread again tomorrow night.

Once again, my intentions are not to start a war but to understand your reasons for homeschooling. Thanks to all the previous posters.
post #39 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
Ok, but aren't there some things that you can't learn by "living it?". How about some not-so-basic math? Can you really learn all the algebra and geometry by "living it?", or you just don't think that your kids need it and knowing how to fix a leaking toilet is more important for them since this skill will be useful in life?

What if your dc decides that he wants to have a career in a math-related field? Can he really do that if you only expose him/her to things that he/she can "live" in?
You can learn algebra quite easy by reading the solutions manual/teacher's edition algebra book.

Algebra can also be taken in college.
post #40 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by M_of_M View Post
The only thing though, for me personally, getting through high school and being 'smart enough' has nothing to do with being a good teacher to a child.
Personally, I think I'm as qualified to teach high school students as most of my high school teachers were - unless you think an education degree is worthwhile. (My mom, an award-winning PS teacher with 30+ years experience, doesn't think it is.) I have bachelor's degrees in history and classical culture, I've studied six languages, I studied math through Calc II and never had a problem with it, I took comparative anatomy in college just for the hell of it. I studied English literature for two years in high school in a grueling class taught by a Ph.D. (she would be one of the ones who IS far more qualified than I am) and have read just about every book imaginable in the Western Canon, many of them several times.

If I'm homeschooling a high school student who has moved beyond my ability to teach, they'll be taking college classes (and I assume they will do so - I did as a teenager).
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