or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Breastfeeding › An interesting, sad reason many women do not breastfeed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

An interesting, sad reason many women do not breastfeed

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
A reason that I have not heard that often for not breastfeeding is this: Getting through the pain of the first week. It's sad but true: We live in a society so afraid of pain and in my opinion, I think a huge reason why many choose not to breastfeed is because it's "too painful" to continue. I personally wish someone would have told me in that first week that the pain would not last forever. I have breastfed consistently since he was born, but I honestly thought it would stay painful!! How wrong I was, as many of you obviously know I love breastfeeding! And I'm so glad that I got through that first week because honestly, there WAS a point on day 3 that I wanted to give up. The milk hadn't come in yet and I was in tears with pain. Just think if I gave up though? I wouldn't enjoy all the wonderful benefits of feeding my baby in the only natural way there is as an infant. Anyways, I just thought I'd share this. :
post #2 of 47
That was why my sister stopped breastfeeding. Oh, and that she expected it to be easy because it was natural. Have either of us ever had someone show us how to do it????

No.... so how was it supposed to be easy?

:
post #3 of 47
it doesn't even hurt that bad...and my son had major issues with latch because of all the drugs we had to take to induce him...right now i have thrush and it hurts like a s.o.b but i wouldn't stop for the world...
post #4 of 47
It is unfortunately a cornerstone of society that we not do things unless they're easy & fun, KWIM? The only time I had pain in the first week was when I had the baby latched on wrong & took my nipple out of her mouth slanted.

It's amazing the attitude I keep encountering...People think that for me to have continued to breastfeed, it must be easy. And usually it is, but I've hit roadbumps like the rest of us, KWIM? Frankly there are times when I am heartily sick of being sucked on all the time, but I deal with it, because there are some things more important!
post #5 of 47
It is so sad that people give up so easily. I had pain in the beginning as well. My nippled were all cracked and bleeding but I kept at it and I'm so happy I did. The best thing now is at almost 5 months dd nurses and then stops to look up at me and smile and then nurses an then looks up at me. It's such a special thing.
post #6 of 47
Dang, it hurt more than my c-section, and went on for 6 weeks! But I was bound and determined. I knew how important it was for my DS, so I kept at it. And it did get to be painless over time. I tell my friends the truth, that it was the hardest thing I've ever done, but also the most worthwhile, and what I am most proud of in my life.

I've said this before, but I 'd really like to see pre-partum counseling sessions with a lactation consultant be a standard part of prenatal care. I think lots of Moms would do much better knowing what is going to happen ahead of time.
post #7 of 47
i tell moms that it does hurt some people for a few weeks but to stick with it...i was very surprised that my nipples were sore with this last baby i thought that because i had bf before that it wouldn't hurt as bad the second time WRONG it was pretty bad for the first 3 weeks and the baby was latching correctly....
post #8 of 47
My DH's niece told me when I was pregnant that she would never BF again because it hurt worse than childbirth. Then of course her DS took 8oz bottles right away so there was no way she could've made enough milk for him :
I told her it wasn't supposed to hurt like that and she probably had a latch problem but she got funny with me about it...and FF from the start with her second. :
post #9 of 47
It is sad...I had a lot of people try to discourage me from BF (while I was pregnant) because "it's so painful." DS is 3wks and I'm still in pain, but I'm determined to stick it out and do whatever it takes because I know BF is best for us both!
post #10 of 47
.
post #11 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by RootSnort View Post
I've said this before, but I 'd really like to see pre-partum counseling sessions with a lactation consultant be a standard part of prenatal care. I think lots of Moms would do much better knowing what is going to happen ahead of time.
You're right, Laura. This is a great idea. I was stubborn and determined enough to breastfeed no matter what that I was able to seek out the help that I needed in the first few weeks - lactation consultants, my county's bfing helpline, even the Medela 1-800 number - but it seems that many women are't. There needs to be some kind of support for post-partum women to know that they CAN do it and and they are not alone.
post #12 of 47
We were lucky for our nursing relationship that I don't remember it hurting. If it had hurt, I probably would have been of the mindset that I wasn't really interested in continuing. After labor and delivery, I just didn't want any more pain, any more, ever.
post #13 of 47
I kept with it through the pain of the first week b/c there was no way in he11 I was going through getting up and getting a bottle 3 or more times a night. Not to mention trying to drag bottles w/me whenever we went out. It's so much easier to just keep nursing!
post #14 of 47
My daughter was tongue tied and it hurt horribly for me. I screamed at pain at latch on for the first two weeks (my husband had to leave the room when I did it becuase he couldn't stand it), then pumped and fed pumped milk for two weeks, finally found someone to fix the tongue (without putting her under GA) then I think it finally started to be pain free at 9 weeks. I think the only reason I put up with all that was because I didn't have the natural birth I wanted, so I was willing to fight for that. I can understand why other women would not have pushed through it like I did. I kept telling myself it would be better after 2 weeks, 6 weeks, etc. Finally it did.
There is a good analogy in "So That's What They Are For!" Quitting bfing after the first week or two is like going to the movies, standing in a long line for the tickets, then standing in a long line to get your popcorn, and then leaving before the movie comes on. You deal with the crappy part but quit before you get to the good part. If more women knew that.... maybe things would be different.
post #15 of 47
What I wish is that I hadn't kept reading 'If it hurts, you're doing something wrong.' This isn't always true. My baby had a super strong suck and great latch. He nursed for hours after birth which made my nipples SO sore. During that first couple of weeks, my nipples cracked open and looked awful and the latch-on pain, which was terrible, continued for a good while after the cracks healed. I was sure I was doing something wrong, but we weren't - it just took some time for my nipples to adjust! Now nursing is pretty much pain free. I can definitely see how women might give up in that situation.
post #16 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by RootSnort View Post
Dang, it hurt more than my c-section, and went on for 6 weeks! But I was bound and determined. I knew how important it was for my DS, so I kept at it.
Oh heck ya - me too!

I would get so frustrated right around 3am or so and be in tears and I probably would have given up except dh was there and able to talk me through it.

Now, I love it and wouldn't trade it for the world, but most of my friends gave up pretty early. (Four months or so)
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphos View Post
The best thing now is at almost 5 months dd nurses and then stops to look up at me and smile and then nurses an then looks up at me. It's such a special thing.
Yes!!
They look right into your soul with so much love! This is one of the most beautiful things of motherhood :

I had wonderful nurses helping DD get a proper latch in the hospital she was born in Denmark. They REALLY made sure all new moms had a good nursing relationship going before leaving the hospital The only time it hurt was when she latched on wrong, but then the nurse quickly showed me what the problem was. When I had DS #2 in an American hospital they just said: "it would be easier for you if you just let us give him a bottle" :
post #18 of 47
I agree. I went through 6 weeks of latching incorrectly and I *DID* get help before leaving the hospital. Primarily because I had read that if it hurts, something is not right.

Well, 2 CNMs, 3 nurses and a lactation consultant all told me everything looked fine to them. They gave me a nipple shield my last day and sent me home telling me all was perfect. It totally wasn't! I was bleeding, cracked, and blistered by the 3rd day home. Only LLL saved me, and that was 2 weeks later. I didn't have internet at the time, so all I could do was sit and wait and try methods in the few books I had that actually had information on how to latch.

Very sad that we don't have hospital personnel with more BF training.

Manda
post #19 of 47
That is what concerns me when people state how easy bf is.
Sure it is for some. But not everyone. What if your only IRL bf support had an easy time and you have complications.

That is one reason when I advocate I let people know that the start can be painful, but with help and support most are able to work thru it.
And when you do work thru the problems you will be sooo happy!!
post #20 of 47
The first 3 weeks of nursing my DD were horrible. The pain was unbelievable. But after that it got better. I think a lot of people think if it hurts it wont get better and screw it. (And I cant really blame them - if it were going to hurt that bad for 16 months I wouldnt have done it either!!!!!!!!!!)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Breastfeeding
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Breastfeeding › An interesting, sad reason many women do not breastfeed