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precocious toddlers, anyone? - Page 2

post #21 of 38
Thread Starter 
And since this thread is still active...

I gotta share what DD did yesterday. First, let me say she can't carry a tune worth a flip, but has perfect rhythm (total opposite of me). she knows all the words to several of her favorite songs.
Yesterday, she was playing "drums" - just banging away. Then she stopped and told my friend we were visiting, "Megan, look and see, Jenny plays drums" and went on to say "one, two, three, four" before resuming the banging! I know she's just heard that on the radio or something, but it really suprised me as it was the first time I've seen her do that particular trick!
post #22 of 38
Quote:
But more than that he is just such a darned good kid! Very emotionally mature - always has been. Even as a newborn he had a maturity about him. He was never really a baby baby, you know? Never really the goo goo ga ga smiling chubby baby, but more the alert, intense, studious baby. I mean, he can be a total goofball, but really hangs well with adults and older kids.

OMG!!! This is and was so much like Kailey!!! Everyone always commented on how serious she was even as an infant. She still is more of an observer than participant in things.

I am definitely going to get that book!!
post #23 of 38
Last summer I was convinced my dd was advanced. And maybe she is but she's slowed down a lot with the intellectual learning and is more into learning social skills and potty training now. I guess she only has enough brain power for a few big things at a time! lol!

She's always done things a little early. Rolled over at 2 mos old, was using rolling as a form of transportation by 4 mos. old. Crawled at 5.5 mos, took first steps at 10 mos (the same time she learned to draw a circle and line by holding a pencil properly). Said her first word at 7 mos.

Last summer when she was 18 mos. old she learned to recognize all her letters (upper and lowercase) and numbers, and a few simple words. She has a very large vocabulary. She also knows colors, shapes (including octogon, teardrop, oval, rectangle, etc), can count to 50 by rote, count real objects up to 10, can recognize numbers up to 29, plus multiples of 10 up to 80 (50, 60, etc).

But not sure if any of this makes her all that advanced really, because she has a long way to go in other areas. Last year we were housebound with the heat and I introduced a few of these topics and she ran with it and had lots of fun.

This summer at 30 months old she's learning social skills through a preschool co-op I'm involved with, as well as one on one playdates with kids her age. She's learning things like taking turns, sharing, asking nicely for toys and offering trades rather than grabbing. She also knows the names of all her friends and the names of their mommies and daddies. She's also gaining a very active imagination, for example insisting that she's Thomas the train and making me call her that. lol! Or handing me a doll and asking me to say hi to her doll with mine and enact certain routines like making dinner or going to bed. Another thing she does that astounds me is to say, "Look Mommy it's like a --" for example a peanut M&M was "like an orange oval and a little ball and an egg." A tortilla chip was "like a triangle and a boat" (sail boat). And yes most of the time she uses a and an in the right context, and is picking up proper uses of plurals like mouse vs. mice.

She has a great memory. Last summer my friend's dd had an accident and I loaned her a pair of curious george toddler undies for her dd (I was saving those for my dd). Well this summer I brought those out and she said, "It's like Annika's panties." She remembered that! Wow! Or I baked an apple pie earlier this week and she said, "It's like Minor's apple pie" (my grandmother, who made an apple pie at Thanksgiving last year).

This summer she also decided to potty train and I can tell that she's putting a lot of mental effort into it, and the other things have slowed down for the time being. More than being proud of her academic achievements, if you can call them that, I'm proud of the fact that's turning into a very kind, caring, and all around good girl despite being very spirited.

Darshani
post #24 of 38
USAmma, my ds has also been doing the same kind of comparisons as yours for quite a while..."Doesn't this look like a ___?" Most recently, since he has been pottying too, his favorite thing is to look in the toilet after a poop and tell me what his poops look like. A few days ago, "Don't my poops look like a happy family of swimming fish?" Okay, maybe just a little more gross than your tortilla chip example, but you get the point!
post #25 of 38
Quote:
his favorite thing is to look in the toilet after a poop and tell me what his poops look like
Oh that is too funny! lol! Do you act all impressed?

Darshani
post #26 of 38
OH MY GOODNESS ocean baby and Brand New me, your kids sound just like my ds. Well, with the exception of looking at sports He was VERY physical at a young age, and still is. He is still very serious, and still a "darn good kid!" People actually comment on it, which I always thought was weird (but I must admit I do like to hear it!).
I used to be so upset that he did not talk, to the point where I was really thinking of taking him to a specialist. I was also so upset all my freinds babies who were the same age were cuddly and smiled all the time. Thomas was always studying something with this intent look on his face. Once he figured out how to move he did not want to be carried or cuddled anymore. I could not understand (he was my first) why other mamas complained their kids never played alone. I was sure something was just wrong somewhere. Well, now I have a velcro Dd so i understand where those mamas were coming from .
Thanks for the book sugestion, I will check it out
post #27 of 38
Found it on amazon.com I think...is this the one you ment Oceanbaby or is there another?
The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late
by Thomas Sowell
Sowell has other books dealing with similar issues also.
post #28 of 38
It's always so reassuring to know you're not alone!

Serentabbie - I know what you mean about the other babies always smiling and being cuddly all the time. I mean, despite his physical inclinations, ds has always wanted me or dh to hold him, but never really liked going to other people, especially stangers. Whereas SIL's baby will go to anyone you hand her to, and sit there smiling. And of course everyone comments about how wonderful that is, and gets all offended and put out that ds doesn't want to go to them or wouldn't flash a smile when they said "peek a boo". But they are such different babies - SIL's dd is technically crawling at 10mos, but mainly just sits there, or else crawls slowly for a short distance. By the time ds figured out how to crawl at 7.5 months, he sped through the house anytime I set him down. SIL's dd will sit for hours in the stroller, but ds has a max of about 30 mins, and that better be spent walking, not sitting still while I look through a shopping rack!

Brand New Me - Yep, at 2 ds is still more of an observer than a participant. Intensely studies everything, but is not inclined to join in at the library sing/dance along or other group activities.

I haven't yet read that book myself, so please let me know what you think!
post #29 of 38
I'd like to reply to something Dentente said.

You said, "*I* was one of those precocious babies. I spoke well at 11 months. Complete descriptive sentences at 18 months and very complex subjects at 2. I read just shy of my 3rd birthday. Short words but they were words. (Cat, bat, pig, dog, etc.) Oh. And I walked at 11 months.

Sadly I am perfectly normal now. My development was normal from the age of about 5 on."

***I find it interesting that that is about the age that most kids start school. Here's a wild thought -- I'm guessing that you, like most other posters here, are female. It's very common for girls, once they realize that they are different in some way, to hide their differences and "dumb down" so that they don't stand out in the group...and one of the first places kids become very conscious of a group dynamic and their respective social roles within a group is in first grade ...about at age five.


***You said, "People get so excited about "how early" their kid does this or that and in the end, kids come out more or less the same. Earlier, later...it pretty much means nothing but I could see how it would be a bit exciting."

***That is not necessarily the case. One thing I am trying to suggest is that abilities might be masked by other considerations, like getting along. I don't know if you've read Stephanie Tolan's great essay, "Is It a Cheetah?" but in that article, Tolan points out that a cheetah can run at speeds of 70 mph...but not when it is kept in a zoo. In a zoo, where it's fed zoo chow, it does not run at 70 mph. It may not run at all. However, that doesn't mean that the animal is not a cheetah.

***Long story short, if someone's child (like Teachma's, for instance) is hitting those developmental milestones waaaaaaaay ahead of everyone else, she might just have a cheetah on her hands. They don't all even out by third grade.: : :
post #30 of 38
Okay, bragging alert. Thanks for starting this thread; my family has been alternately hostile and indifferent to my dd's intellectual accomplishments; they really prefer to hear about when she rides her trike or goes to the park so that they can be assured that I'm "just letting her be a kid" and "letting her have a normal childhood" and not "creating a monster."

1. Spoke her first words at 8 months old (other than "Mama" and "Dada"

2. By 14 months, she was beginning to use 2-word sentences

3. By 18 months, I stopped counting the number of words she could speak because they topped 800 and I was losing track.

4. By 18 months, she knew all of her letters (upper- and lowercase) and the phonics sounds associated with them.

5. At 24 months, she was tested on the PLS-3 language test and came out above 52 months in language skills.

6. By early 2, she was reading a handful of sight words and by 2.5, could sight-read an easy reader (one of the Robert Lopshire books -- "Put Me in the Zoo") she had never seen before.

7. She loves opera and wants to be Papagena from "The Magic Flute" for Hallowe'en...or the Statue of Liberty, or maybe Gertrude from "Hamlet."

Thanks for the opportunity to share this stuff. I don't usually get the chance.
post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Charles Baudelaire
It's very common for girls, once they realize that they are different in some way, to hide their differences and "dumb down" so that they don't stand out in the group...and one of the first places kids become very conscious of a group dynamic and their respective social roles within a group is in first grade ...about at age five.
Very true. At least for me. My parents made me somewhat wary of behaving too precociously. It got me a lot of unwanted attention from them and from others who called me "show off". My friends in the neighborhood were closer to developmental norms for our age group. I wanted so badly to be like them and not have my "specialness" keep me from being just a regular kid. My mother spoke little english, my father was not around much due to his job. It was a make or break moment and I went underground with my brain. I did earn and kept the playground name "poindexter". :

I guess having had the experience of being singled out for being different betrays the social norms of the age I grew up in and the socio-economics of the area as well. Being smart = being different. Being different=bad.

If my parents had made less of a fuss about it then things might have gone differently. I think it was just me, the dynamic with my parents and the area that may have slowed my little cheetah a$$ down some. I think you may be on to something though. I would hope there is some middle road between praising a child for progress and making the child feel awkward about their progress as compared with that of other children.

Denny
post #32 of 38
Hi, Dentente,

You said,

"Very true. At least for me. My parents made me somewhat wary of behaving too precociously. It got me a lot of unwanted attention from them and from others who called me "show off". "

***Yikes...Having gone through some comparable nonsense myself, I heartily sympathize. Being accelerated verbally got me little more than misery from students (and teachers!) in school. We plan to homeschool ours and just skip the game of "Let's Play 'Lord of the Flies!' You're It!" for good and all.


My friends in the neighborhood were closer to developmental norms for our age group. I wanted so badly to be like them and not have my "specialness" keep me from being just a regular kid. My mother spoke little english, my father was not around much due to his job. It was a make or break moment and I went underground with my brain. I did earn and kept the playground name "poindexter".

***Yeah, our culture really values intellectual achievement, doesn't it? Imagine a Michael Jordan type feeling as if he had to hide his athletic skill in order to fit in!

I guess having had the experience of being singled out for being different betrays the social norms of the age I grew up in and the socio-economics of the area as well. Being smart = being different. Being different=bad.

If my parents had made less of a fuss about it then things might have gone differently. I think it was just me, the dynamic with my parents and the area that may have slowed my little cheetah a$$ down some. I think you may be on to something though. I would hope there is some middle road between praising a child for progress and making the child feel awkward about their progress as compared with that of other children.

***I do too. From what I've read, it seems to me that as far as praise goes, praising the effort ("Wow, you really worked hard to draw that drawing / build that tower / solve that problem") works faaaaar better than praising an innate ability they neither asked for nor have any control over, e.g., "You're so smart!" Hope I don't screw this parenting thing up...:
post #33 of 38
It just depends on so many different things. I got "you're so smart" all the time. I liked it. I reveled in being smart. I didn't earn any playground names. I also went to a very cool Open School in which different = good. That wasn't so much my parents or my neighborhood as the school.

Letting your children know that you think they are wonderful and you are proud of them is never a bad thing, IMO. I'm sure there are ways to do so that have greater and lesser degrees of success, but I think if you just keep that general concept in mind, you should be fine.
post #34 of 38
I was always the "smart" kid in school. My parents always encouraged it. But they were generally in favor of not conforming in any aspects. They always talked about "weird" being a compliment. It actually wasn't until highschool that I got any flak whatsoever for always knowing the answers, and even then it was good natured ribbing. To this day I still get flak from my friends whenever we play board games - I am the one person no one wants to play with because I always win. And I don't even try that hard - it's not fair!

One thing that my parents did was move me into an accelerated classroom in grade school, mainly because I was bored in the regular classroom. I was reading on my own before kindergarten age (I never went to preschool or kindergarten), started 1st grade at 5, and have always loved school. I've always reveled in being good at it, and am glad I had parents who respected that, without being pushy or unsupportive. I think that is a very important thing to do as a parent.

And I didn't talk at all until I was almost 3!
post #35 of 38
Oceanbaby. I'll play with you! Nobody will attempt Scrabble or Trivial Pursuit with me anymore. It's such a drag!!

post #36 of 38
oohh how fun! Everyone's children sound amazing!

dd spoke her first word (other than mama or dada) at 7months

by 14months she knew over a hundred words and count name and point out 20 different animals and their corresponding sounds.

by 16months she knew 10 different shapes and 10 colors as well as her upper case alphabet and the phonetic equivelants of the letters. She also could sing entire songs and had almost all of her books memorized.

by 18months she could say her ABC's in their entirety and count to 20by memory and count objects to 12. She also learned her lower case letters (thank you Chika Chika Boom Boom!)

She's currently 20months (almost 21) and has an ENDLESS vocabulary. She is constantly curious and has the most AMAZING memory I've ever encountered. She remembers absolutely everything. She can memorize a book within 2 readings of it. She has also started site reading some words, fox, cat, mama, dada. Her creativity has really started to take off recently and she has been altering songs and thinks it's soooo funny 'the itsy bitsy lady bug crawled up Korina's arm, down came the ladybug and we left it in the park'. She has also just started singing in time to music. It's soooo funny to listen to her singing in the car along with her tapes.

What I find annoying are the comments we get from people all of the time. DD is not shy about talking and since she's still bald, looks younger than she is. People comment all of the time and say stupid things like 'isn't she too young to be talking' DUH.

Anyway, we love her to pieces and if she's gifted, she's gifted, if she's not she's not. We don't really care in the slightest as long as she's happy. We don't work with her on things or do flash cards, etc. We read a lot because she enjoys it but basically just follow her lead. Thank goodness Salvation Army sells books for .25cents!!!
post #37 of 38
Ours started calling me Mama when he was 4 months, and has been adding to his vocabulary ever since. We quit counting when he got up to 100 words at around 11 months old. Now at 16 months he is using 4-word sentences, and refers to past and future events. When I tell him we are going to do something, he refers to it over and over. Yesterday he said "miss cousin Owa (Laura)", who he hasn't seen in a couple of weeks. He also shows imagination, holding something like a walking stick and saying "cane" (his great-grandfather uses a cane, so he knows the concept). He drags his toothbrush across a towel and says "rake".

A couple of weeks ago, my brother started his motorcycle which is stored here in our garage. The baby didn't see it, but heard it from inside the house, and I told him what the noise was. A few days ago he said "Uncle James ride momocycle".

He has a cloth book called "The Me Book", which I had rotated to the closet shelf along with some toys that we put away for a while. The other day he was looking through the basket where The Me Book used to be kept, and said "Me Book". It has been stored since before he was able to say "book"!

When he saw a little animal being roughly handled and crying out on TV, he yelled "OH NO!" and started crying! We had to change the channel. So I know his empathy is developing.

He correctly uses words for spacial orientation and similar actions, like "on chair", "out playpen", "outside", RIDE horse, DRIVE car, TAKE bath, TAKE vitamin. If we don't respond to a request, he repeats it another way. If he is asking to nurse saying "milk", and I don't respond right away, he says "nurse", then "see mole" (there is a mole next to one breast!) Hilarious!

When we wanted crayons, my husband didn't understand his word, so Isaac said "up" until my husband picked him up, then "open" until he opened the cabinet where the crayons are, then pointed and repeated his word for crayon.

In the last few weeks he has begun to fill out his grammar, switching from just pointing and saying the word for something to saying "want grapes" or "hold it cup".

He quotes from his books and imitates "Oobie" the hand-with-eyeballs character from Noggin. He holds up his fist and moves it around and says the words the same way the show does.

This morning when he woke up he said "open door see Papa". I didn't get up right away, so he repeated "see Papa doin'". When we found his father not at work yet (it's still early Saturday), he said "down shop work"!

Gues we better get busy!
post #38 of 38

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Edited by valeriamc - 10/21/13 at 4:28am
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