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should I contact CPS? - Page 2

post #21 of 51
CALL BOTH!
But don't call SPCA, call Animal Control and be really hysterical. They may send someone right over to get the dog AND if you call cps, I don't know, i'm sure if you were hysterical they would hurry but they may be more concerned with kids who are being abused by parents not by scarey dog KWIM? I don't know, just a thought. Good luck, I say call no matter what.
post #22 of 51
Someone I know works for CPS. Here's what they said:

"What that woman's sister is doing would probably be considered "imminent risk." That is considered abuse, and either the kid or the dog would have to be removed immediately. I don't know how Texas works, but most states have an "imminent risk" abuse category, or something very like it. It's no different than allowing a known sexual predator to reside in a home with your children. Also - CPS only places children as a last resort, more likely, they'd make mom get rid of the dog, and if she refused, the sister can contact CPS and ask to be a resource for the child."
post #23 of 51
Yes, call BOTH animal control and CPS. Don't bother calling the SPCA.
post #24 of 51
I'd call both Animal Control and CPS. Call Animal Control first. Deal with one person...whoever is in charge, preferably. Then call CPS with all contact information for Animal Control. Get the two agencies to coordinate efforts.
post #25 of 51
Thread Starter 
well, i just got off the phone with animal control.
i am stunned. the officer told me that she couldn't do a thing to help me. she said that once the animal has been quarantined and cleared of suspicion for rabies, the owner is free to return the animal to the home. it is the owner's choice to keep the animal or relinquish it.
so it appears that my only option is CPS. i am going to give my father some time to reply to me and to try and talk sense to my sister, but if he is unable to do so, then i feel like it's my obligation to intervene on the child's behalf. obviously my sister refuses to see the danger in keeping the dog.
sigh. sometimes i wish i was an orphan.
post #26 of 51
How old is the child? What kind of dog? Has the dog shown any kind of aggression towards anyone else? Did the child provoke the dog? I'd hate to see an animal put down (and if you just randomly call several animal agencies, who knows what kind of results you will get - when a dog is removed, where do you think it goes? Not to a nice new home) because people are irresponsible or a child hasn't been taught how not to antagonize the dog.

I could be way off, these could be unprovoked attacks - I'd like to know more about the situation.
post #27 of 51
Thread Starter 
the child is 5. she's been bitten in the face about once a year since she turned one.
the dog is a sheltie, 9 years old. bred in a puppy mill, no socialization until he came to my sister at about 4 months old. very skittish dog. he should not be around children, period, as he is too nervous and responds to noise and movement by snapping.
you are right in saying that my sister is an irresponsible pet owner. she has not trained the dogs (there are 3) how to act in public or around people. they bark incessantly, they do not know how to sit or stay or heel. there are no boundaries in that house.
as far as my niece, well, she's 5. i don't know how much is reasonable to expect of a 5-year-old. she is constantly reminded not to bother the dogs, but my sister is weak on follow through. she thinks saying it is enough.
i, too, would regret seeing the dog put down. but if she will not contact a rescue group or even try to sell him or give him to a childless couple, what else is there to do? she had the opportunity to give him to our uncle, and backed out. that was 2 bites ago.
the whole situation disgusts me. she gives a bad name to so many groups: dog owners, mothers, my family. i want to wash my hands of her.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally posted by Elphaba
well, i just got off the phone with animal control.
i am stunned. the officer told me that she couldn't do a thing to help me. she said that once the animal has been quarantined and cleared of suspicion for rabies, the owner is free to return the animal to the home. it is the owner's choice to keep the animal or relinquish it.
so it appears that my only option is CPS. i am going to give my father some time to reply to me and to try and talk sense to my sister, but if he is unable to do so, then i feel like it's my obligation to intervene on the child's behalf. obviously my sister refuses to see the danger in keeping the dog.
sigh. sometimes i wish i was an orphan.
Elphaba. I hate to say this but I am really disturbed by this situation with your niece and that effing dog. Your sister is not a fit parent to that child and the very worst kind of dog owner. To keep a dog without teaching it some rules is to essentially doom the dog, which I believe she has done.

Every day that the child is in that house with a dog that will bite her is a day she could get killed. Children DO get killed by dogs. In San Francisco a full grown woman was choked to death by a dog recently. Please don't delay on this or wait for anyone's approval. That child needs to come out of that home and now. To you, to your parents, to a foster home. ANYWHERE where she can be safe in her own home.

This is doubly hard because it's your sister but this is the only chance your neice has of living out her childhood in relative safety.

Please do it.

Denny
post #29 of 51
I agree that you should call CPS, the sooner the better...I feel very sorry for your niece. Even if your sister knows its you and gets mad its worth it for the safety and well-being of your sweet and innocent niece. How can a 5 year old be expected to know how to handle and act around an aggressive dog? It seems like you care more about your niece than your sister.
post #30 of 51
She should care more about her niece than her sister! Her sister is a grown woman and can risk herself around a dangerous dog all she wants on her own judgment--she has no right to risk a defenseless child.

CPS should be called, and if your sister is stupid enough to choose her dog over her child, the child should be removed from the home--in TX they look for a relative to place the child with before a foster home wtih strangers, so she'd probably go to your in-laws or your mother's (I'm assuming your mother lives nearby her,) whoever was willing/had room, etc. In a case like this the child would probably be returned to her mother as soon as the dog was removed/died and the mother went through some counseling.

It's sad when a child's basic physical safety comes before her bond to her parents--but that's her parents decision if they don't get rid of the dog!
post #31 of 51
We were in a similar situation. I live in TX and when our dog bit, the ER didn't really care how it happened, they just wanted to make sure he had his shots.

We got a basset hound from the pound while I was pg with our dd. He was an older puppy, about 6 months old. I have grown up with several bassets and really wanted another one and saw him advertised in the paper for the pound.

Anyway, he was a really sweet dog to us, very loyal, never bit etc, but when I brought dd home from the hospital, he was pissed, literally he looked at me and peed on the floor when he saw her. But he never bothered her until she could walk.

One day she was about 14-15 months old, she was walking across the room to me, and the dog was about 20 feet away from her. Completely unprovoked, I saw him literally fly across the room at her, and aim for her face, growling and barking. He scratched up her cheek, and we rushed her to the ER, I was afraid he damaged her eye. Thankfully, it was just her cheek. He was thrown outside for the night, and the next day went to my parents' home until we placed him in a training program. We put him in a two week intensive program, he lived there for 2 weeks of training. Then we came and took several lessons with him and he came home.

She had never abused him, hurt him, pulled on him or anything. We had taught her from the very beginning how to be nice to him. When we first got him, he was emaciated, and I think he had wild streak in him from living out on his own (my husband had seen him wondering a field before we found him at the pound).

After the training, he was a well behaved dog and left her alone. We thought it was a one time incident and really loved him and wanted to keep him and thought training had fixed the problem. I was wrong! About 3-4 months later, the same thing happened. It was the scariest moment in my life, I couldn't get to her fast enough and pull that dog off of her. Thankfully, she had another scratched cheek, and nothing else. At that point, my parents came over and picked him up that night, and he stayed with them until we found him a home that with an older couple that have no grandchildren. He is now a happy dog, who likes to herd cattle.

Anyway, what we learned later was that training will usually not help an aggressive dog. And they should probably be put down. I just didn't have the heart back then to do it to him, I should have and feel guilty for not putting him down.

We now have a wonderful female black labrador. We got her as a puppy when dd was not quite 2 yrs old. Dd is now almost 4 and they are the best of friends.

But I would definitely be calling CPS on that woman. For the dog to have attacked that many times and she still has it in the home is very frightening. I feel guilty for not getting rid of the dog the first time instead of sending him to training.
post #32 of 51

Re: should I contact CPS?

Quote:
Originally posted by Elphaba
[B]So, knowing what you know, would you call CPS on your own sister in this situation? [B]

YES...ASAP
post #33 of 51
I think children should come before dogs, no matter what. If my child got bitten by my dog and it turned out she had tied it to a table leg and kicked it repeatedly, I would still get rid of the dog.

I don't think this woman is fit to own any dog. Any breed of dog can become violent or unsuitable for children if not raised and trained properly.
post #34 of 51
I'm sorry for you. I can't imagine how conflicted it must make you feel to be put in this situation by your sister. That being said, I think you should call. Now.
What exactly are you waiting for your father to do? Would he go to your sisters house and remove the dog? Would she let him? I mean no disrespect, I am just wondering exactly what he will be able to do? Your sister doesn't sound like she takes to advice very well.
I am disgusted that animal control would not do anything. Disgusted.
Please do call CPS.
post #35 of 51

tiptoe fairy I don't understand

why you feel guilty for not putting him down if he is now in an environment where he is happy and productive herding cattle?

It seems you had a good outcome in the end though the road there was bad ??
post #36 of 51
This is a really hard thread for me b/c I would give the dog a chance. Ok, similar situation, we had a friend whose 5 y.o. tried to grab a fresh dog bone away from their pet Husky and got bit in the face for it. First and only sign of aggression EVER. Big discussion in our little community of friends. Mom decided to keep the dog as her son had been warned numerous times NOT to disturb the dog while eating, etc. Several years later...never had any more problems w/a loving dog and his best friend.

Now...my GrandMIL had a evil little animal that sounds like your sister's dog. Just evil. Jealous mean little animal that snaps your knuckles as you walk. Leapt off the couch and nipped my 18 mos old in the face. I created a family scene and said I never wanted my son to go over there unless the animal was crated or penned in another room. OH HOW CRUEL and overprotective was I. Big family problem until just last week when... the dog died!

So....speaking as a dog lover...it sounds like the dog has proven itself be its repetitive behavior to be unfit to live w/children. I think that's a fairly excitable breed anyway and perhaps the family just did a "poor" job of socializing them together. When my son was about a year, he walked over to our giant German Shep. and poked her in the eye. She moved her head. He did it again. She opened her mouth (still laying onthe floor), took the pointer finger in her mouth and bit down softly enough it didn't even leave a mark. He started to poke her again, shook his head and petted her instead. After 2.5 years together, there's total love and respect with all of our pets.

So... speaking as the MOST resistant person to this decision, I'd say yes, call family services. Animal control can't enter a private home and kidnap an animal. Family services can offer some advice backed up by enforcement.
Poor dog. It's really not its fault. But, the situation is what it is. Maybe an older couple could adopt it. SPCA could help w/that.

GOOD LUCK What a horrid situation.
post #37 of 51
I didn't read all the posts, but it's my understanding that ANY dog who bites more than one time must be destroyed (I live in the DFW area and all the larger cities have the same policy). Here's a link to the Plano website. It should have info on animal control http://www.planotx.org/ctystaff.html. I too am an animal lover and we own what some consider to be an aggressive dog (blue heeler) but if she EVER bit one of our children on the face my dh would be after his rifle in a heartbeat. No dog is worth a child's life. Call yesterday!
post #38 of 51
Maybe you could let your sister know by email that you think the situation is so serious you feel the need to try and force the issue and see no other alternative than calling the child services. I'm guessing she'll guess it's you anyway if you call without telling her and it sounds like you aren't on the best of terms anyway. I don't know - but could you demand the dog be destroyed to ensure your niece's safety "or else"? I hate threats but also think she has a right to know what you are planning and a chance to avert it - as I don't think she's "abusing" her child - the dog just needs to go and homelife will be healthy - right? I can tell you from personal experience that it happens that when child services gets involved things do not always get better - so I myself have to be convinced that having a child removed will be absolutely better than the current situation. I understand that if she doesn't get rid of the dog - what other choice do you have?
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally posted by momea
I don't think she's "abusing" her child - the dog just needs to go and homelife will be healthy - right? I can tell you from personal experience that it happens that when child services gets involved things do not always get better
The parents are not abusing that child? Scuse me but allowing the child to be repeatedly bitten and hospitalized IS abuse. I am very much surprised that CPS has not been called by the hospital in this situation. I think the authorities are as a negligent as the parents here. That child is not safe in that home and I doubt she's safe with parents who do not see how they are endangering their own child. If they did not see that the dog needed to go after THE SECOND TIME IT HAPPENED then they are incapable of sound judgement regarding the welfare of that child.

What was your experience with CPS?

Denny
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Scuse me but allowing the child to be repeatedly bitten and hospitalized IS abuse.
Yes, and so is lying to the doctor about the cause of the injuries. And getting rid of the dog, giving that child a brief moment of hope, only to bring the dog back and ruin everything.
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