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How old it too old for a child to be in a booster seat? - Page 7

Poll Results: How old is too old for a child to be in a booster seat?

 
  • 16% (23)
    7-9 years
  • 23% (32)
    10 years
  • 5% (7)
    11 years
  • 11% (16)
    12 years
  • 5% (8)
    13 years
  • 2% (4)
    14 years
  • 0% (1)
    15 years
  • 0% (1)
    16 years
  • 0% (1)
    17 years
  • 32% (44)
    18+ years if the person hasn't reached 4ft. 9in.
137 Total Votes  
post #121 of 166
Excellent point. I edited for clarification.
post #122 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
That's a moot point. $$$ doesn't mean a thing if a seat is not installed properly and used consistently.

We don't have a top-o'-the-line Britax - just a standard econo-model high back booster with belt positioning. I'm confident that my DD is safe b/c the seat is properly installed and used every time she is in the car.

Exactly. The less you go in the car, the more you decrease the risk. We do that - not going in the car.

I don't really want to argue lots about this, and it seems it is getting this way. I am just trying to put across my point. For some people, putting children in carseats is HARD. We do what we can to reduce the risk to our children (in our case, by nearly never going in the car) but I just can't sit next to my child when he is so upset he can't breathe and "sing" to him. I can't ,won't and don't want to do it. Imo the greatest risk at that point is emotional. You can disagree, but I know, for my child, I have made the right choices.
post #123 of 166
It's great to be anti-car and pro-public transit. But people who live where there IS public transit, need to realize that many people live where there is NOT. If we did not go in the car, we would never go anywhere. There is one park within (long) walking distance. We can do that off and on late Sept. through early May. Summer? Forget it. Way too hot for a mile walk.

Other than that, if we go ANYWHERE, it's in the car. Grocery store, post office, family gatherings, play group, ANYWHERE. You go in the car or you don't go.

-Angela
post #124 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
It's great to be anti-car and pro-public transit. But people who live where there IS public transit, need to realize that many people live where there is NOT. If we did not go in the car, we would never go anywhere. There is one park within (long) walking distance. We can do that off and on late Sept. through early May. Summer? Forget it. Way too hot for a mile walk.

Other than that, if we go ANYWHERE, it's in the car. Grocery store, post office, family gatherings, play group, ANYWHERE. You go in the car or you don't go.

-Angela
I am only talking about ME(and my ds!). I am not sure what we would do if we lived somewhere with no public transport! I am not anti-car per se. I just get fed up of the carseat posts on here. People don't seem to realise what it is like to live with a child who absoloutley won't sit in one without a total palava. I could force him to sit in it, but I feel like by doing that, I am breaking the trust he has in me,yk? He is getting better though. At least he understands what "there in 5 minutes means" now


As an aside, I am jealous of your hot weather..in London it has been raining for a month and no nice weather forcast 'till August...I would LOVE to walk a mile down a sunny road Thanks for your reply about the positioners..I always see them on sale and wonder. I was goiong to get one for giving kids lifts but I guess it's just as easy to keep a booster cushion in the boot.
post #125 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
I could force him to sit in it, but I feel like by doing that, I am breaking the trust he has in me,yk?
Over the years, I have "forced" my kids to do things in order to keep them safe. You ride in Grandpa's boat, you wear a life jacket. You hold my hand when we cross the street. You sit in a stroller when we are in a busy place and I have other children to keep track of. You allow me to cut up that hot dog into safer pieces before you eat it.

They might not like those things - and they may loudly protest them, but it isn't trust-destroying. And as I said before, I HAD a baby who HATED the carseat. She's 13 now, and those months of "forcing" her to sit in the carseat certainly haven't hurt our relationship at all. In fact, she doesn't even remember.
post #126 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
I am not anti-car per se. I just get fed up of the carseat posts on here. People don't seem to realise what it is like to live with a child who absoloutley won't sit in one without a total palava. I could force him to sit in it, but I feel like by doing that, I am breaking the trust he has in me,yk?
One more question for you.
So, if your son decides at age - oh, say - eight or so, that he won't use a seat belt without a "total palava", and refuses to wear one (possibly using the justification that "Mummy didn't make me sit in the carseat/booster if it bothered me") - then what?
post #127 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
Over the years, I have "forced" my kids to do things in order to keep them safe. You ride in Grandpa's boat, you wear a life jacket. You hold my hand when we cross the street. You sit in a stroller when we are in a busy place and I have other children to keep track of. You allow me to cut up that hot dog into safer pieces before you eat it.

They might not like those things - and they may loudly protest them, but it isn't trust-destroying. And as I said before, I HAD a baby who HATED the carseat. She's 13 now and those months of "forcing" her to sit in the carseat certainly haven't hurt our relationship at all. In fact, she doesn't even remember.

I try, very hard, not to "force" anything. I think it is better to reach mutual compromises or solutions. "Forcing" my child do do anything isn't really a route I want to go down. I know we are different, and I am glad that works for you, I just don't want to do it with my child. x
post #128 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
I try, very hard, not to "force" anything.
ITA - that's why I've been putting the word "force" in quotation marks. I do not feel that taking certain appropriate safety measures is forcing anything on a child.

If your kid doesn't want to wear clothes in the dead of winter, is insisting that he be appropriately clothed "forcing" him? Or is it TEACHING him that it is important to be warm for his own safety and well-being?
post #129 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
One more question for you.
So, if your son decides at age - oh, say - eight or so, that he won't use a seat belt without a "total palava", and refuses to wear one (possibly using the justification that "Mummy didn't make me sit in the carseat/booster if it bothered me") - then what?

An 8yo is a different matter. They are capable of reason and understanding. A 1yo is NOT capable of that. At 8, if he didn't want to wear the seatbelt, we wouldn't go in the car. I can't imagine that happening with a child that age though. I have been talking of my expriences with a baby. My ds is 2.5 now and is so much better in the car now, because he understands what I am saying to him.

If he didn't want to wear clothes in the middle of winter, I wouldn't force that either. I would let him go out dressed in whatever he liked and bring extra clothes in my bag. I am sure after a few minutes, he would realise that I may have a point. Stuff like that is good for children to doscover by themself...much easier that way
post #130 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
I Just though of something whilst reading this thread. What about seatbelt positioners? Are they better/worse/the same as your child sitting in a booster? Obviously not for really little ones, but if you are a teenager(or adult) and still short, are these a good option?
In most cases, the aftermarket seatbelt positioners raise the lap belt to across the abdomen. This would mean that in a crash, the crash forces would be transferred into the abdomen and there would be a high probability of organ damage. Properly fitting seatbelts allow the crash forces to be absorbed by the shoulders and hips, which are large bones and more able to withstand crash forces than internal organs.
post #131 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
he would realise that I may have a point. Stuff like that is good for children to doscover by themself...much easier that way
And in the situations below, is it "much easier that way" as well?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
You ride in Grandpa's boat, you wear a life jacket. You hold my hand when we cross the street. You sit in a stroller when we are in a busy place and I have other children to keep track of. You allow me to cut up that hot dog into safer pieces before you eat it.
Let the kid choke on a hot dog - and next time he'll remember to ASK to have it cut up???

Sorry, I'll never get your reasoning. We provide certain boundaries and rules for our children not to make them happy, but to protect them from harm. They don't always like these boundaries - but often they are just too young to reasonably understand the dangers that make the boundaries necessary. If we consistently assure them that the boundaries keep them safe, I believe that kids get an enormous sense of security in knowing that their parents want to keep them safe, out of love.
post #132 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
If he didn't want to wear clothes in the middle of winter, I wouldn't force that either. I would let him go out dressed in whatever he liked and bring extra clothes in my bag. I am sure after a few minutes, he would realise that I may have a point. Stuff like that is good for children to doscover by themself...much easier that way
: In central BC where I'm from it can get cold enough for spit to freeze before it hits the ground. I just can't imagine taking a half naked child out in that weather. :
post #133 of 166
I think spero, we will have to agree to disagree. If ds wanted to go on a small boat, yes, he would put on a life jacket. He doesn't have to hold my hand to cross the road (although he normally does), walking by my side is fine too. He doesn't have to sit in a stroller (our stroller is mainly for carrying shopping ) Hot Dogs...he wouldn't eat on if I paid him, cut up or not

In our family, we do have boundaries. Mutual, respectful ones. My ds is normally an easygoing, kind, bright child. He reeeeally does not liked to be strapped down in a carseat and we work with that. As he gets older, we talk more about why we do some things (like carseats!) and the older he gets, the easier it gets.
post #134 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post
: In central BC where I'm from it can get cold enough for spit to freeze before it hits the ground. I just can't imagine taking a half naked child out in that weather. :
Well you could try...I bet they would learn fast why you said they should put on their clothes!
post #135 of 166
Here I can let dd go naked to learn that clothes are important in winter. In a climate like North_Of_60? No way. I would be endangering her life.

I would never take a child out of a carseat in a moving car. Period. It's unacceptable and illegal in most places.

Stop when I can and take them out? Sure. Reduce using cars? Absolutely.

Like clothes are a non-negotiable in areas of extreme cold, carseats are a non-negotiable in cars.

-Angela
post #136 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
Well you could try...
No, I wouldn't. When I say it's so cold it litterally takes your breat away when you first go from the heat of your home to being outside, I'm not kidding.
post #137 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post
No, I wouldn't. When I say it's so cold it litterally takes your breat away when you first go from the heat of your home to being outside, I'm not kidding.

Ok I believe you I don't think I've ever been anywhere that cold! Surely your kid would just poke her nose out then..she wouldn't want to go right out, if it's that cold, would she?!

I am going to bed now! I have learned a few things from this thread.

Thanks chckabiddy for the expanation re belt positioners, I won't purchase one!
post #138 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrox View Post
...I could force him to sit in it, but I feel like by doing that, I am breaking the trust he has in me,yk?
I think this tends to backfire. My mom was a total free spirit, let the kids make their own decisions, hippie type parent. Ultimately our take on it was that she didn't really care enough about us to bother enforcing an occasional rule that would have afforded us some protection. Honestly.

I think there is a balance. But kids, even babies, can grasp the concept of 'I'm doing this for your own good'. And they respect and appreciate it. I really do believe that.

And I'm very much a hands-off, let the kids explore, they are their own persons type parent as well.
post #139 of 166
One other thing that keeps coming to mind here is, I think we sell babies short. I did a LOT of talking and explaining when dd was tiny and an amazing amount of the time she seemed to get it at some level.

I keep her strapped in the carseat because I love her and will do whatever is in my power to protect her.

I think she understood that.

-Angela
post #140 of 166
Quote:
I keep her strapped in the carseat because I love her and will do whatever is in my power to protect her


Quote:
Over the years, I have "forced" my kids to do things in order to keep them safe. You ride in Grandpa's boat, you wear a life jacket. You hold my hand when we cross the street. You sit in a stroller when we are in a busy place and I have other children to keep track of. You allow me to cut up that hot dog into safer pieces before you eat it.

They might not like those things - and they may loudly protest them, but it isn't trust-destroying. And as I said before, I HAD a baby who HATED the carseat. She's 13 now, and those months of "forcing" her to sit in the carseat certainly haven't hurt our relationship at all. In fact, she doesn't even remember
.

ITA with the above.

My oldest hated riding in her carseat so much that she would cry until she vomited- repeatedly- and was a breath holder, too, and passed out on more than one occasion. But babies and toddlers outgrow stages, unless of course they're killed in car accidents. As a parent, sometimes making the hard choices is what separates the responsible from the lazy.
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