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would you send your caucasian child to an all african american school? - Page 2

Poll Results: would you send your caucasian child to the school described below?

 
  • 27% (93)
    Yes.
  • 40% (137)
    No.
  • 26% (90)
    Maybe/ not sure.
  • 4% (15)
    Other.
335 Total Votes  
post #21 of 436
Well, it wouldn't be my preference to send a child to a mostly white school, either. If the two choices were one that was almost all white and one that was almost all black, and all other things were very similar - I don't know what I would choose. I'm lazy, so probably the closest one.
post #22 of 436
It's really pretty tough and lonely to be the only white kid. Probably somewhat like it's tough to be the "only" kid of any particular background in an otherwise ethnically homogenous environment.

I've been the only white kid in the classroom, and I would not choose to repeat that experience for my own kids, just to be brutally honest here.

That said, all schools are different. Maybe the social environment there will be more welcoming and supportive than the school I attended.

On the up side, it does make you sit up and pay some attention when you're on the OTHER side of the majority/minority fence!
post #23 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
Are we talking about high schoolers who are well aware of race relations in America today, or preschoolers who can't even *see* skin color yet?
eee, AFAIK, even preschoolers are actually very aware of skin color and cultural differences, and they tend to congregate with other preschoolers of similar ethnic backgrounds, even in very diverse classrooms.

Didn't someone just put out a study about this? (isn't there ALWAYS a study?) where even kids as young as 3 have already picked up on racial/cultural differences and actively seek out those children who resemble themselves?

It would take a lot of talking and communicating with my kid to feel comfortable that my child was really being well-served in a situation like that.

Unfortunately.
post #24 of 436
hmmmmmm - this will be a very real issue for us. More so for HS than Elem. The HS is about 10% caucasian.
post #25 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightyferrettoes View Post
I've been the only white kid in the classroom, and I would not choose to repeat that experience for my own kids, just to be brutally honest here.


On the up side, it does make you sit up and pay some attention when you're on the OTHER side of the majority/minority fence!
Yes, I had this experience a few times, too, growing up. It was rough being shy, too - so the kids didn't bother to learn my name. I was "blondie" or "white girl" to most people. However, I think the experience did open my eyes to a fraction of what it feels like to live every day as a minority in your own country. I think that experience was invaluable for me.
post #26 of 436
I said yes. I actually went to a grade school from Kindy to 5th grade that besides when my brother started school when I was in 5th grade, it was me and 3 other kids who were white. None of us were in the same grade.
I quess I just never knew anything else so I never thought about it until I went to junior high and I was part of the majority.
When my parents bought our house they did not know my neighborhood was part of a project that all the kids were bussed out of the neighborhood 30 minutes away to a totally different school district, that majority African American.
A lot of the other parents fought it and had their kids transfered out. I am not sure why my parents did not do it, but til this day they still rave about my grade school.
When I got into about 4th grade I had some promblems with bullies but I had gone to that school for so many years that I had very established friends who stood up for me.I am not even sure it was race related or for just the simple reason they wanted to bully someone.
When I think about it today it still is not that big of deal for me, I have the majority of positive memories of school.
I think my parents were so nonchalant about it, the only thing that bigged them was how far away my school was, when there was 2 grade school 5 minutes away from our house.
post #27 of 436
mojo mom, that sounds like some of my dh's school experience.

i agree that there's not enough to go on. what is the school's educational philosophy? what about discipline?

if the question is there's one school 10 minutes to the east that is all Afircan American and has average/mediocre facilities and nice teachers and there's another school 10 minutes to the west that has equal facilities and equally nice teachers and is all white and there's another school that is 10 minutes to the south that is racially diverse and has equal facilities and equally nice teachers then i would pick the racially diverse one.

if the question is would i seek out an all African American school to send my child to just because it was all African American the answer is no. my feeling would be that they might like having an all African American student body and i wouldn't want to put my highly sensitive, spirited, anxious, dramatic little girl in a situation where she might not be wanted. she wouldn't cope well. there are probably other kids who would do well in that environment, but i'm doubtful that my kid would thrive.

right now we're in a small private $chool because of dd1's anxiety issues. i wish it were more racially diverse. it's not all white, but close. it certainly does not reflect the racial make-up of the surrounding community. they did just hire a new director, though, so maybe he will put more of an emphasis on a racially diverse student body.

can you give us a little more background on your question?
post #28 of 436
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your replies. I asked this question for 2 reasons, 1) I remember in school there was often "1" child of a different race either in the class or the school and I imagined it must be isolating and 2) I am likely sending 2 of my kids to the school described above (so there will be 2 white children, not 1 in the school ). My kids are technically 1/4 hispanic but look white.

There are 303 students in the school.
post #29 of 436
I voted no.. partly because of the school being mediocre/not so great facilities and partly because of the low test scores but also a big part of it is the racial diversity.. there isnt any.. Im looking for schools for ds now and Im making it a point to look for something diverse. DH is Mexican and Polish, Im English, Scottish, and Irish.. I want our children to be around caucasians, African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and any other race out there. I don't want to subject my kids to just 1 race all the time. I think its a BIG deal that kids learn to appreciate other races from the beginning so they dont discriminate later in life. I dunno.. those are just my thoughts
post #30 of 436
I don't think the question is fair. What would the alternatives to this school be? Everyone should choose the best educational choice available for their children. Is this the best one in the area?

I would definitely not decide against a school due to its ethnic makeup. There are so many more important factors.


Of course, I choose no school at all, but that's another story.
post #31 of 436
Well, I just don't think the question ends up being about race--which is the presumption based on the title. All other things equal, race the only factor, I think yes. But mediocre facilities, okay teachers, no, definitely not. As it currently stands, my children attend the most ethnically, linguistically and socioeconomically diverse school within our two-city district and I'm extraordinarily happy with the school for those reasons and that the teachers are really above the average that I'm used to in my profession. Of course, the "scores" are lower, but to me that's so much dust in the wind. It's all about the nitty gritty of a school. So, I didn't vote, but no, I wouldn't be stopped by race alone. The other factors definitely stop me in my tracks. I guess it's kind of like asking me if I'd send my kids to Howard University. The answer is Hell Yeah! Would I send them to Awful U? Not-On-Your-Life.
post #32 of 436

Since you were curious

1) the description of the school makes it sound beyond deplorable

2) I was beat up by the black kids at school (some of whom were on parole) when we switched schools in 11th grade - we were going to go to the Catholic school vs. PS HS BUT the principal recommended the social scene would be difficult for me entering at 11th grade - I think getting beat up was worse

3) where I live, if you're going to a completely black school - the neighborhoods really aren't safe and your home price will NEVER rise

4) given that situation I'd probably homeschool rather than expose my kids to that particular PS

So, HECK NO.

Liz
post #33 of 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by dachshundqueen View Post
1) the description of the school makes it sound beyond deplorable

2) I was beat up by the black kids at school (some of whom were on parole) when we switched schools in 11th grade - we were going to go to the Catholic school vs. PS HS BUT the principal recommended the social scene would be difficult for me entering at 11th grade - I think getting beat up was worse

3) where I live, if you're going to a completely black school - the neighborhoods really aren't safe and your home price will NEVER rise

4) given that situation I'd probably homeschool rather than expose my kids to that particular PS

So, HECK NO.

Liz
See, all that stuff, especially #3, I thought the OP accounted for by saying the students and teachers were nice... ?

Although these are factors I considered as well ~ in most areas that I've studied the regions that have all-Black schools are the ones that are the most poorly funded and with the most violence and least social support. BUT I figured the OP was setting up kind of an ideal hypothetical school with just a lack of diversity. You know?

post #34 of 436
I am almost certain that I wouldn't. I have an adult family member that went to school with all African American kids, he was the ONLY Caucasian kid in the entire school, and it was AWFUL for him. He got made fun of and bullied in school and jumped and beat up by these same kids almost every day on his walk home from school, all because he's white. Granted, this wasn't the safest city to live in, so I'm sure that was a factor, but still...
post #35 of 436
I'm not sure that nice teachers can overcome lack of funding, poor facilities, and average test scores.......

How does one determine behavior problems? I looked at ratio of kids on free lunch, test scores, teacher education levels, parental reviews, and ethnicity to help me pick a school/school district.

Liz
post #36 of 436
Absolutely not.

When a school is all one race/ethnicity, it develops a culture of it's own around the students. There is no thought of acceptance right away - the different race child will be seen initially (and possibly forever) as "the outsider." In a school where there are many races all the time, a new non-white child is viewed (mostly) as "oh that's the new kid." It's very different being a "new kid" and being a "different kid."

I would not expect warm fuzzies and open arms if I were to send my white child to an Afr. Amer. school. I would be prepared for problems (not expect them, but be prepared).

I'd homeschool first.

Jenn
post #37 of 436
Thread Starter 
Violence won't be an issue though, because the students are very, very well behaved. As for the test scores... a lot of schools have average test scores, that's what makes "average" average. I saw samples of work in the hallways and it was much neater, with better spelling, than what my kids are capable of presently (they have been eclectic/ semi-unschooled up to this point).

But I am concerned about their being seen as outsiders.

The staff is all white, btw. I'm not sure if that makes a difference. And it is a private school, so problem students can be asked to leave. Parents sign a form agreeing to be responsible for their child's behavior and the student can be removed without warning.

The facilities... yes, they are kind of dismal. It was clean, though.
post #38 of 436
I think the big unanswered question in the initial post is economic status. Are the pupils primarily at least middle class with a family expectation that they will attend college (and parents who attended college)? That is the sort of environment that will be more likely to provide the enrichment activities, resources and educational experiences I want my kids to have.
post #39 of 436
I'm just shocked at some of the responses here .
post #40 of 436
I voted other for two reasons
1. although my daughters look white, they are a mix of mexican, cherokee, swiss, greek and german, so I hate to simplify their varied backgrounds by referring to them as caucasian or white.
2. I don't think the fact that the school was african/american would be a determining factor in choosing my child's education.
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