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Churches that teach prayer to God, not Jesus? - Page 2

post #21 of 39
SM, could you talk to the imam at your masjid, or another knowledgeable Muslim? It would be best if it were someone born here, since they'd be more likely to be understand the cultural context and interfaith stuff. In the big picture of your marriage, this is pretty important, and not really something to be taking advice over the internet about.
post #22 of 39
Thread Starter 
I know the internet isn't the best place to get advice, or to give personal info like this, but right now, I just don't really feel comfortable talking to anyone IRL about it all. I feel like I am in this awkward place where the people I used to talk to about everything don't understand/accept my beliefs and won't be supportive, but I don't really know anyone in the Muslim community well enough to feel comfortable talking to them either I still kind of feel like an outsider among them, but if I don't talk about it, I start dwelling on it, and that is no good either.
post #23 of 39
Berean Bible Students do not believe in the Trinity. They believe that God & Jesus are separate, and that Jesus is not a deity. I was one for 18 years...I should know.
post #24 of 39
Jehovah's Witnesses also do not believe in the Trinity. They believe that God is the Almighty and prayers should be directed to Him.
post #25 of 39
HI Jennifer, Assalamu Alaikum:

Mabrook on your reversion! I totally understand what you're going through, as I went through a similar thing with my family. I totally second the recommendation of a UU church! I've actually attended one from time to time wearing hijab and haven't had any issues. They have a good religious education program there as well. I think it's the sort of Church that you could attend as a family and still feel comfortable being a Muslim there.

My path to Islam involved a long period as a Monotheist... and I searched high and low for a non-Trinitarian church. Never found one, sadly.

Remember whatever church you do attend, that church is usually one day per week for a few hours. You're a Mom 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. If your kids see you praying, they're going to pick up on that and ask you questions. At Christmastime, it's very easy to say, "Y'know, Jesus, peace be upon him, is one of the greatest Prophets that ever lived. But I don't believe he was God or even wanted to be worshiped as such." Just teach them as you go. Know that they might revert, or might not... but either way, Allah(swt) will reward you for your efforts.

Good luck!
post #26 of 39
Does it have to be a Christian church? Obviously, one group which prays to God but not to Jesus would be Jews.
post #27 of 39
Quote:
I know the whole basis of Christianity is the he was the son of God, but is there a church that doesn't actually pray to Jesus? Thanks!
I agree with the PP's suggestion for the UU church. I'd like to add the Society of Friends (Quakers). I'm an erstwhile Quaker, married to a non-religious Muslim, and I don't really accept the divinity of Jesus Christ.
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamabadger View Post
Does it have to be a Christian church? Obviously, one group which prays to God but not to Jesus would be Jews.




I think she's looking for something to satisfy her DH's need to have his children in a Jesus-following tradition without her having to do the "praying to a person" thing.

And Jews are *not* in a Jesus-following tradition.
post #29 of 39
Summertime Mommy-

Christians believe that Jesus is God. You will not find a single church that prays to "God not Jesus". That doesn't make sense in the context of Christianity.

I am a Christian married to a Muslim. We have promised never to teach the children anything, or bring them to any place of worship, without the consent of the other parent. I would strongly suggest that you agree on a both-or-neither policy if you have a hard time dealing with it. We do both.
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by izobelle View Post
Summertime Mommy-

Christians believe that Jesus is God. You will not find a single church that prays to "God not Jesus". That doesn't make sense in the context of Christianity.
This is not correct. Some Christian denominations believe this, some do not. Considering that several times in the NT Jesus prays to the Father, and it is difficult to imagine that Jesus would be praying outloud to himself, it is not hard to see why some Christian denominations would in fact consider the Godhead to be made of three separate beings who are one in purpose and not the same person.
post #31 of 39
Alisaterry:

The three-persons one-being conception of God is the only Christian conception of God (see the Nicene Creed). All denominations which believe this pray to Jesus, and believe that He is God. There is a reason that ecumenical councils include ONLY churches which subscribe to the Nicene Creed. Any other church is teaching heresy.

The Sabellian heresy goes further and states that Jesus is not only God but one in person with the Father. This is not believed by any church of substantial size, as far as I know.

Then there is the Arian heresy, which teaches that Jesus was created, not born, of God.

Then there is the Nestorian heresy, which Mohammed himself believed. These believe that Jesus is not God and that God could not have become man or taken human form.

I hope you won't take this as a personal insult. I am married to a Muslim man and view Islam as just one more heretical religion (it resembles the LDS religion to an amazing degree, in fact) that has sprung out of Christianity. I respect all people and their right to practice and call themselves what they want.

But followers of Jesus believe Him when He said "I and the Father are One."
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by izobelle View Post
Alisaterry:

The three-persons one-being conception of God is the only Christian conception of God (see the Nicene Creed). All denominations which believe this pray to Jesus, and believe that He is God. There is a reason that ecumenical councils include ONLY churches which subscribe to the Nicene Creed. Any other church is teaching heresy.

The Sabellian heresy goes further and states that Jesus is not only God but one in person with the Father. This is not believed by any church of substantial size, as far as I know.

Then there is the Arian heresy, which teaches that Jesus was created, not born, of God.

Then there is the Nestorian heresy, which Mohammed himself believed. These believe that Jesus is not God and that God could not have become man or taken human form.

I hope you won't take this as a personal insult. I am married to a Muslim man and view Islam as just one more heretical religion (it resembles the LDS religion to an amazing degree, in fact) that has sprung out of Christianity. I respect all people and their right to practice and call themselves what they want.

But followers of Jesus believe Him when He said "I and the Father are One."
Heresy according to whom?
You're entitled to your opinion, but the truth of the matter is that there are Christian churches that either don't pray to Jesus and don't use the Nicene Creed as their statement of faith (Unity, for example).
post #33 of 39
"there are Christian churches that either don't pray to Jesus"

I respectfully disagree. This is not my opinion. At worst, it is merely my belief. It is also the belief of the vast majority of Christian believers around the world. However, we are getting into a semantic point. Generally, the term "Christian" has been applied to followers of Jesus, that is, those who believed Him to be the Christ, and therefore, God.

However, the term could be redefined to anyone who follows him, either as a teacher or as God or as a good example. I suppose if we are just going to define religions as we please, then the OP could go to a mosque and claim that since Muslims respect Jesus as a teacher, the second-to-last prophet, and respect the original Bible, it is also part of the Christian tradition, and thus, Christian.

I suspect most Christians would disagree.
post #34 of 39
I was raised Catholic, and while most of the talking was done ABOUT Jesus, and what he said/did, all prayers were directed right at God. It always weirded me out when I heard others praying to Jesus. It didn't feel right.
post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wendy1221 View Post
I was raised Catholic, and while most of the talking was done ABOUT Jesus, and what he said/did, all prayers were directed right at God. It always weirded me out when I heard others praying to Jesus. It didn't feel right.
Without taking sides about what is right, the Catholic church definitely prays to Jesus Christ. The mass contains prayers like Christie Eleison/Christ have mercy, for example, or the prayer known as the Anima Christi.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by izobelle View Post
"there are Christian churches that either don't pray to Jesus"

I respectfully disagree. This is not my opinion. At worst, it is merely my belief. It is also the belief of the vast majority of Christian believers around the world. However, we are getting into a semantic point. Generally, the term "Christian" has been applied to followers of Jesus, that is, those who believed Him to be the Christ, and therefore, God.

However, the term could be redefined to anyone who follows him, either as a teacher or as God or as a good example. I suppose if we are just going to define religions as we please, then the OP could go to a mosque and claim that since Muslims respect Jesus as a teacher, the second-to-last prophet, and respect the original Bible, it is also part of the Christian tradition, and thus, Christian.

I suspect most Christians would disagree.
I really don't want to get sucked into another "who's a real Christian" discussion, and I don't think that was the purpose of this thread. I think the OP was seeking more practical guidance on her situation.
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasingPeace View Post
I really don't want to get sucked into another "who's a real Christian" discussion, and I don't think that was the purpose of this thread. I think the OP was seeking more practical guidance on her situation.
Agreed, but would like to add I do find it insulting to again and again have my "Christianity" denied and doubt that Muslims appreciate being called heretical. It's that kind of "respect" that causes discord all over the world.
post #38 of 39
Back to the OP questions, I believe the following church's (that I have some personal experience with) meet the non-trinitarian distinction:

--Unitarian/ Unitarian Universalist- open and welcoming of people of multiple faith paths, and depending on the congregation incorporate the teachings of many religions into the service and religious education curriculum. I attend a UU church and have for several years

--Christian Science- believe that Jesus was the "son of God", but do not pray to him in anyway to him. Believe that Jesus was a teacher for us all and that through his teachings and experiences we can be at one with God, as we are all the children and a reflection of God. Have distictive beliefs about modern medicine and healthcare that are "different" (illness is spiritually based) and eschew most healthcare options. Attended throughout my childhood.

--Unity- Was formed by former Christian Scientists, and is dramatically less dogmatic about medicine and take a more holistic approach to health and well being. Definately christian-based, but also do not believe in praying to Jesus and do often incorporate ideas from other faith traditions in the service. My experience is limited to a few visits in college and to what my sisters have told me (it is their faith choice).

All that said, I don't think that finding a Christian church to take the kids is the "right" answer, as it doesn't get at the root of the issue (your dh's opposition to your reversion). He may thinks that if he can get you to church you will give up this idea of being a Muslim.

I agree with the person (people) who have suggested that if church is so important to him and he is opposed to you taking them to the mosque, he should take them to the church he sees fit. this is his issue far more than your.
post #39 of 39

I go to a church that does not pray to Jesus..we believe yes that Jesus was the son of God.God worked through him during his time,but he is not God.When we pray we direct all our prayers to God.Its a pity most churches these days tend to praise Jesus more than they praise God.Try praying and praising God directly you will definitely see just how much your life will change..

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