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Your Opinion on Cursive (moms with kids 10 and up) - Page 2

post #21 of 47
It is easier earlier IMO because children first learn to write/draw in circles but since I din't do this I am working on cursive now at her rate. They will learn it eventually...... Isn't HS great? It is all at their pace
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joan View Post
I'm not convinced that it's important to ever learn it, actually...I don't see any reason why one couldn't learn to use script later on, if they wanted to, but I also don't see it as important enough to struggle over.
Not a mom of a 10 yo, but I agree with you. I personally feel that script is going to the wayside - it's more an art form than a skill that must be mastered. Neither dh nor I write anything but our siggies in script. We made it through graduate school just fine I do have great appreciation for fine script and can read it just fine, but I do not write in script.
post #23 of 47
My boys learn cursive in the 3rd grade, and have it mastered by the end of fourth. (all grade levels subjective, of course, but somewhere around 9-11 years old)

We use the Reason for Handwriting workbooks. It takes them 5 to 10 minutes a day, 4 days a week, but just that much practice is all that's needed. After they finish the "Transition to Cursive" book, I begin requiring cursive on other subject assignments.

Cursive has come very easily to my boys. My oldest son has nearly illegible printing, but with cursive he is forced to slow down a little his cursive is much easier to read.
post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmom View Post
You want to look into the Palmer method.
Is there a guide, workbook, etc. that teaches how to do the Palmer method? I've found lots of references to its having been taught in schools in the early 1900's, but can't find "how." Thanks!
post #25 of 47
No importance whatsoever. I really don't understand making people suffer to learn something that they do not need. A PP wondered whether one would be able to read cursive without learning to write it; my son is currently learning to read it, and he prints only. (He is very interested in deciphering my notes written in my own weird hybrid style. ) I can read all sorts of handwriting styles (it's really much more varied than linked vs. not linked) despite never having used them myself.

If a person wants to learn it later, they certainly can. I taught myself various kinds of calligraphic fonts and architectural printing, have made up an alphabet with completely unique symbols that I wrote cryptograms with, and have consciously altered my own handwriting style many times to incorporate letter forms that I hadn't used previously, all as an adult. I know people who have taught themselves to write in Arabic and Kanji as adults. To me it's a complete non-issue. If they are really in love with the idea of writing in a certain way, they can learn it when they want to. If not, it doesn't matter.
post #26 of 47
Not a HSer and I don't have a 10 year old, but I think the answer is it depends on a child.

I think there are a lot of children out there who are forced to print too early or too fast, and end up with some really bad habits. Their printing is very inefficient and often illegible. For many of these kids starting over with cursive can be easier than unlearning the bad habits they developed with print, and can be an easy way to correct the problem.

On the other hand, if your child has clear, efficient printing, then I think that learning cursive beyond signing one's name is not neccessary. Unfortunately, the kids with clear, efficient printing often feel good about their fine motor skills and are the ones eager to learn cursive.

There's also a third group of kids -- those with real fine motor/graphomotor delays for whom any kind of writing will always be hard. For them I'd establish some semi-legible printing and then focus on keyboarding, which is IMHO the most important of the three.
post #27 of 47
We skipped it completely. I mean she was shown how the letters are written that way but there was no requirement to practice or learn it.
post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arduinna View Post
We skipped it completely. I mean she was shown how the letters are written that way but there was no requirement to practice or learn it.
It was fun for her when she was interested and then she just let it go. She goes back and forth between print and cursive when she writes now, and Ds is all print all the time.
post #29 of 47
My dd-9 prints. She has never asked about cursive but when she does I'll certainly show her. I don't think it's important though unless it's important to her. My ds-8 strongly dislikes anything to do with writing.
post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arduinna View Post
We skipped it completely. I mean she was shown how the letters are written that way but there was no requirement to practice or learn it.

HMMMM maybe Isadora can cross one thing off her list for next year....
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momily View Post
I think there are a lot of children out there who are forced to print too early or too fast, and end up with some really bad habits. Their printing is very inefficient and often illegible. For many of these kids starting over with cursive can be easier than unlearning the bad habits they developed with print, and can be an easy way to correct the problem.
This is why I prefer early cursive/D'nealian instruction as opposed to Zaner-Blosser.
When you learn cursive/D'nealian, the letters are made in one stroke, two if it's a 't' or 'i'. Zaner-Blosser depends on sticks and balls. Which is better for a child to help with any potential writing problems - a one stroke method or sticks and balls? The one stroke means the 'd' and the 'b' are formed very differently, but the sticks and balls mean that a child can form the letter any way they want - there's no individual pattern the fingers follow.
I honestly think it's more important to teach a one stroke pattern from the beginning instead of starting over again 3 years later to teach it.
post #32 of 47
I was talking to a neighbor and she was horrified to look at my dd's homemade cookbook and discover that my 8 year old still printed all in capital letters: . Anyway, in an ironic twist she did mention that her public schooled child never learned to wright in script. But she can sign her name. And my dd is eagerly learning cursive from the poster we have hanging over the dining room table. I know plenty of well educated adults that print all in caps (big caps and little caps!) and others who only print but use upper and lower case, and plenty of others who can write in cursive but it is illegible. I imagine that there are also lots of smart folks who can't write at all. However, since signing mortgage papers, etc., with an X might cause a bit of judgmental attitude, I imagine it would be a good thing if children at least learned to sign their own names. It amazes me how with my dd, she is always "behind" her schooled peers in some areas but then she "catches up" with virtually no effort on her own time table and then had all that extra time to learn all the things that she really wanted to.
post #33 of 47
Let me preface by saying I am neither a mom, nor do I have a 10 year old.

I never learned cursive. I tried, I failed classes, I cried, I hated it, finally I got far enough in school to where people didn't care. Seriously, I could not write all of the letters if you asked me to sit down and do it. If you asked me to write this post in cursive it would take me maybe 30-40 minutes and my hand/wrist would be SO sore by the end.

In the middle of one of those papers in junior high school where you would fail if it was not in cursive, I was dealing with the horrible hand cramping and soreness, and crying because I hated cursive so much and my grandma showed me an article she was reading about fine-motor muscle development differences between her generation and my generation. It turns out IT IS PHYSICALLY HARDER for someone who does modern day activities to hold a pencil/pen, especially during cursive. That's right, someone born in the 70s or earlier has an EASIER time with handwriting than someone born after the 1980s the article predicted that this definition would become more and more pronounced as computers and video games and other fine motor activities became less like holding a pencil. The reason is the kinds of games, work, play, and just day to day activities are different. For instance using a computer keyboard/mouse tones the muscles to be a different shape from holding a pen since they are a different shape it is more difficult to manipulate them the same way. We have actually played games to test this and I can push a button approximatly 20 times faster than my dad, yet he can use a pencil much better than I can. I can type at least 5-10 times faster than my mom or dad, and my mom can do flawless caligraphy.

I wish I could find that article or a similar one today, but I have tried for hours with no luck. I just wanted to impart this knowledge, because I find cursive to be a sore spot in my life, and something that has never ever ever mattered in "real life" since in the average year I hand write maybe MAYBE a cumulative total 1-2 pages of text. For the record I consider myself to be an amatuer author with at least 500 pages in novels and screenplays under my belt, so it is not like I just don't write at all.
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShaggyDaddy View Post
In the middle of one of those papers in junior high school where you would fail if it was not in cursive, I was dealing with the horrible hand cramping and soreness, and crying because I hated cursive so much and my grandma showed me an article she was reading about fine-motor muscle development differences between her generation and my generation. It turns out IT IS PHYSICALLY HARDER for someone who does modern day activities to hold a pencil/pen, especially during cursive. That's right, someone born in the 70s or earlier has an EASIER time with handwriting than someone born after the 1980s the article predicted that this definition would become more and more pronounced as computers and video games and other fine motor activities became less like holding a pencil. The reason is the kinds of games, work, play, and just day to day activities are different. For instance using a computer keyboard/mouse tones the muscles to be a different shape from holding a pen since they are a different shape it is more difficult to manipulate them the same way. We have actually played games to test this and I can push a button approximatly 20 times faster than my dad, yet he can use a pencil much better than I can. I can type at least 5-10 times faster than my mom or dad, and my mom can do flawless caligraphy.
You just helped me feel better about my decision to keep video games out of my house Thank you. The children's computer time is limited to educationally necessary activities only as well. We play a lot of board games, do a lot of art work. Use manipulatives etc. The children will eventually get to play more games etc....but I think that the article you mentioned shows we need balance.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by moondiapers View Post
You just helped me feel better about my decision to keep video games out of my house Thank you. The children's computer time is limited to educationally necessary activities only as well. We play a lot of board games, do a lot of art work. Use manipulatives etc. The children will eventually get to play more games etc....but I think that the article you mentioned shows we need balance.
I dunno, cursive does not help me in my daily life, and having "cursive" muscles is not an advantage in most workplaces. Every job I have ever had has involved an extensive amount of keyboarding and Zero "handwriting" I have had some pretty "normal" jobs too. I feed my family with my video game and keyboard skills, as do most of my friends, so it is hard for me to see these things as harmful or even really optional.

I guess what I am saying is I feel like the change in muscle shape is an adaptation, rather than a handicap, as it provides a more capable means of meeting the average days challenges. Cursive would do nothing for me in my daily life, therefore I would consider it to be an obsolete skill for my lifestyle (and indeed for all of the people I know).
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShaggyDaddy View Post
I dunno, cursive does not help me in my daily life, and having "cursive" muscles is not an advantage in most workplaces. Every job I have ever had has involved an extensive amount of keyboarding and Zero "handwriting" I have had some pretty "normal" jobs too. I feed my family with my video game and keyboard skills, as do most of my friends, so it is hard for me to see these things as harmful or even really optional.

I guess what I am saying is I feel like the change in muscle shape is an adaptation, rather than a handicap, as it provides a more capable means of meeting the average days challenges. Cursive would do nothing for me in my daily life, therefore I would consider it to be an obsolete skill for my lifestyle (and indeed for all of the people I know).
I think balance is necessary because that way your children can use both sets of skills. My dh writes by hand everyday at his job
post #37 of 47
ITA taht it's more important to be able to read cursive than to write it. However, people DO need to be able to sign their names on various documents- so children should at least learn how to sign their names in cursive, even if they never learn how to write anything else.
post #38 of 47
meh.


When I was in school we were graded on our handwriting. I'm artistic and could pull straight As without studying, but no matter how much I practiced, my handwriting was always bad. Screwed up my GPA, grrrrrrrrr!

I think we need to learn it, but I don't see why in a computer age anyone really needs to be able to do much more than sign their name in cursive. I still write in kind of a cursive print combo, and mostly I type. I never could understand how I couldn't just draw perfect letters, but I can't. I'm kind of glad they don't seem to be grading my dcs on their handwriting at school.
post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by moondiapers View Post
I think balance is necessary because that way your children can use both sets of skills. My dh writes by hand everyday at his job
Quote:
Originally Posted by moondiapers
You just helped me feel better about my decision to keep video games out of my house Thank you. The children's computer time is limited to educationally necessary activities only as well.
huh? I don't understand how the near total exclusion of something constitutes Balance?

limited/No video games were an extremly high priority to my mother, and cursive/handwriting was an extremly high priority. I still ended up with impressive computer and video game skills and no cursive skills.

I would not limit pens to only educational purposes because that would ruin pens. I want my DCs to use pens/pencils to draw, to color, to write dirty limericks, to draw technical scematics, and to play tic tac toe. I don't understand how computers are different... it is like a pen, a canvas, a toy, a movie theater, a store, a radio, a conversation and every book in the world all rolled into one; I just don't understand how to avoid the draw of so much empowering information. I don't use the computer solely for education, and if you are reading this then neither do you, and I would not be able to post a link, edit a picture, write software, debug a network, modify games etc etc if I had. A computer is the pen of this generation. There are about 500 employees out of approx 50,000 in my company who do not have a computer on their desk, I work in the financial industry. Tellers, grocery store clerks, salesmen, blue collar factory workers, teachers, students, and everyone in-between are more effective if they can use a computer for more than just the specific task at hand.

I never understand how I am not preaching to the choir when I am speaking to people on a social, educational, entertaining website about the importance of using the computer for social, educational, and entertaining things.
post #40 of 47
It's more because I believe in limiting any screen time until children are much older....it's the left over Waldorfian in me Screen time can have a very negative effect on a still developing brain.
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