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Does your PUBLIC school require uniforms? - Page 3

post #41 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chinese Pistache View Post
Or is that even legal? I would so LOVE to have uniforms for public school. I wonder who I could talk to about that. . .
The school district here was talking about uniforms. I will fight them tooth and nail if they try to implement it.
post #42 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnw826 View Post
That's pretty common, even when uniforms are not required. With all the school shootings, I think they are just being extra careful.
Not only have I never seen a school require this, I have never seen a clear backpack. So I don't think it is common, it must be a regional thing. So what about girls who need to bring tampons or pads to school? Are they just supposed to endure people being able to see that they are on their period?

Also, one of my daughter has issues with clothes. She is very picky. Her clothes cannot have buttons. They cannot have collars. I took her to buy some jeans for school the other day and we came home with two pairs because the style at the store we were at is to decorate them with buttons. She hates her sisters hand me down clothes that have draw string closures. I have given up buying clothes for her and will only buy them when she is with me because she hates everything.

Most polo shirts have buttons and collars. Jumpers have buttons. I would have to see the pants but if they have pockets with buttons she wouldn't wear them either. What do they do about children like dd? I am sure she is not the only one. Do they just force them to comply while the child cringes in the clothes all day? Doesn't seem productive to learning when the child can't concentrated because they are forced to wear clothes they can't abide.
post #43 of 138
None of the schools around here do, and I am grateful for that. My kids will be going to public school starting in just 2 years. I can see one side of it that it helps keep the "classism" issue at bay if everyone wears the same thing. I can see that it help avoid uncomfortable situations like some kid wearing a swastika t-shirt and the principal having to decide if the kids has to change or go home or if they should let the kid express themselves.

However all that said, i still think that in the world of public education, and schedules and rules and requirements the last thing I want is for my kids choices and freedoms to be further carried to what she or he is allowed to wear.
post #44 of 138
I think I would almost rather see uniforms in schools since the alternative is some of the crap many of my son's schoolmates wear. He'll be a first grader and already there are pants that sag, t-shirts four sizes too big, daisy dukes with that ever precious writing on the butts ("cherry", "hottie", "cutie"), spaghetti strapped or halter tops that sag and little girls nipples are visible. Blah Blah Blah. My son is a gym short, t-shirt kind of boy. He doesn't really like shirts with writing or transfers on them. He hates jeans because they are stiff and they sit on the floor alot for circle time and morning assembly. What he does love and is banned at school-temporary tattoos! If they are visible, the kids have to go home and remove them. They are a distraction and inappropriate. HMMMM? Ass cracks and nipple aren't?
post #45 of 138
My kids go to public school and there is no uniform policy there. I kind of like the idea due to the kids being soooooo in compitition with brands and fads. But i don't like the idea because of individuality. Hmmmmm it is tricky...
post #46 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
Not only have I never seen a school require this, I have never seen a clear backpack. So I don't think it is common, it must be a regional thing. So what about girls who need to bring tampons or pads to school? Are they just supposed to endure people being able to see that they are on their period?

Also, one of my daughter has issues with clothes. She is very picky. Her clothes cannot have buttons. They cannot have collars. I took her to buy some jeans for school the other day and we came home with two pairs because the style at the store we were at is to decorate them with buttons. She hates her sisters hand me down clothes that have draw string closures. I have given up buying clothes for her and will only buy them when she is with me because she hates everything.

Most polo shirts have buttons and collars. Jumpers have buttons. I would have to see the pants but if they have pockets with buttons she wouldn't wear them either. What do they do about children like dd? I am sure she is not the only one. Do they just force them to comply while the child cringes in the clothes all day? Doesn't seem productive to learning when the child can't concentrated because they are forced to wear clothes they can't abide.
Clear backpacks have been often required here for at least 10 years.

And yeah, she'd be SOL. :

-Angela
post #47 of 138
Another issue I have with uniforms that was originally pointed out to me by a distressed mama- overweight children (especially girls) have NO chance of looking cute. : Tucked in shirts, tailored pants and skirts- not friendly to heavier girls. Left to their own devices they could wear leggings and big tops and cute clothes. Uniform clothes? No chance. Not to mention that many don't fit them and they're forced to wear clothes that don't fit.

Makes me really sad.

-Angela
post #48 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Another issue I have with uniforms that was originally pointed out to me by a distressed mama- overweight children (especially girls) have NO chance of looking cute. : Tucked in shirts, tailored pants and skirts- not friendly to heavier girls. Left to their own devices they could wear leggings and big tops and cute clothes. Uniform clothes? No chance. Not to mention that many don't fit them and they're forced to wear clothes that don't fit.

Makes me really sad.

-Angela
That was me.. on another thread.. I didn't want to start that fight again since 50% of the people didn't agree with me or just couldn't understand where I was coming from.

Apparently "safety" at all costs is more important than a child's self esteem. The imagined threat of a child hiding a gun in an "untucked" shirt matters more than the "overweight" child who is verbally abused day in and day out because the clothes make them look worse.

We are fast becoming a country that lets the power to be take away our freedoms and dictate our every move for the illusion of safety. This is even extending to our children.
post #49 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
That was me.. on another thread.. I didn't want to start that fight again since 50% of the people didn't agree with me or just couldn't understand where I was coming from.

Apparently "safety" at all costs is more important than a child's self esteem. The imagined threat of a child hiding a gun in an "untucked" shirt matters more than the "overweight" child who is verbally abused day in and day out because the clothes make them look worse.

We are fast becoming a country that lets the power to be take away our freedoms and dictate our every move for the illusion of safety. This is even extending to our children.
Actually, originally it wasn't you It was pointed out to me about 10 years ago by a friend of the family. Still makes me sad to think about.

I totally get it.

I'm just glad to see someone else feels the same way.

-Angela
post #50 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Actually, originally it wasn't you It was pointed out to me about 10 years ago by a friend of the family. Still makes me sad to think about.

I totally get it.

I'm just glad to see someone else feels the same way.

-Angela
Aww.. I thought you were referring to the thread discussing school uniforms about six or so months ago.
post #51 of 138
I'm sure I chimed in then too. The subject truly disturbs me.

-Angela
post #52 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Another issue I have with uniforms that was originally pointed out to me by a distressed mama- overweight children (especially girls) have NO chance of looking cute. : Tucked in shirts, tailored pants and skirts- not friendly to heavier girls. Left to their own devices they could wear leggings and big tops and cute clothes. Uniform clothes? No chance. Not to mention that many don't fit them and they're forced to wear clothes that don't fit.
I realize this was probably true at one time, but I wonder how accurate it is now. I know that a lot of mamas up thread have talked about buying uniform clothes at shopko, target, land's end, etc. All those places have large plus sized girls and husky boys selections, even more so on the website -- not to mention web clothiers who cater to larger sized children. Even in the 1980's, I could buy plenty of basic clothes along the lines of a uniform at target in size 16+, so the idea that you'd be unable to find a pair of khaki pants that were flattering and a navy blue polo shirt in those sizes seems unrealistic to me.

Moreover, as a kid I think I would have been more comfortable in a situation where there was a uniform rather than having to worry about how the latest fad in clothing would look on my exceedingly ample figure. Yes, I can remember one time when I ended up ahead of the curve and what was fashionable actually was flattering to a plus-sized body (remember in about 1996, when everyone was wearing long tunics and broomstick skirts? God, I wish I could go back!), but far more often what was fashionable would look worse on me than slacks and a polo... and without uniforms I was under terrible peer pressure to wear whatever was in fashion, whether it looked good or not and whether I could afford it or not.
post #53 of 138
It's not about being able to find clothes that fit in larger sizes - it's about the fact that as a plus sized woman with large breasts, I look ridiculous and feel both physically and emotionally uncomfortable with my shirt tucked in. Although I wasn't plus sized as a child, I had early puberty and a shapely body - and it was hard to dress. we had to do a lot of searching to find clothes that didn't make me feel uncomfortable. I can't imagine if I had been even more limited by having to choose only certain styles or certain colors.
post #54 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipse View Post
It's not about being able to find clothes that fit in larger sizes - it's about the fact that as a plus sized woman with large breasts, I look ridiculous and feel both physically and emotionally uncomfortable with my shirt tucked in. Although I wasn't plus sized as a child, I had early puberty and a shapely body - and it was hard to dress. we had to do a lot of searching to find clothes that didn't make me feel uncomfortable. I can't imagine if I had been even more limited by having to choose only certain styles or certain colors.
:

If you think boys making fun of an 11 year girl wearing a 36C is bad with clothes that LOOK good, just imagine how bad the teasing would be if she was forced to wear form fitting clothes that had to be tucked in. :

I don't really care if they now make plus sized clothes. As someone who has to buy plus size I can tell you that even though they are making the clothes bigger, they are still don't look good on plus sized people.

For example.. low rise plus size shorts?? (It never occurred to me that something so ridiculous would exist until I accidentally bought some without trying them on.) Shirts that are fit over the breast so that the line that is supposed to be UNDER the breast is usually across the middle. Caped sleeves that show your upper arms. I have finally come to the conclusion that I can only get clothes from Lane Bryant and never to buy anything other than a t-shirt without trying it on.
post #55 of 138
We have kids of all sizes at my dd's school. The don't require a specific brand or style of uniform-- they only specify the colors of the tops/bottoms/dresses, and that it be modest (must have sleeves, a collar and be no more than two inches above the knee), and beyond that the kids can pick styles that flatter their shape. The Catholic high school that's close by-- they only allow blouses and pleated skirts for the girls and I do admit that they are not flattering. But then-- plaid pleated polyester skirts are pretty ugly no matter what.
post #56 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipse View Post
It's not about being able to find clothes that fit in larger sizes - it's about the fact that as a plus sized woman with large breasts, I look ridiculous and feel both physically and emotionally uncomfortable with my shirt tucked in. Although I wasn't plus sized as a child, I had early puberty and a shapely body - and it was hard to dress. we had to do a lot of searching to find clothes that didn't make me feel uncomfortable. I can't imagine if I had been even more limited by having to choose only certain styles or certain colors.
: Tailored pants are just not a flattering choice for some bodies. Then you have kids like my niece who are long in the waist and regular pants look dreadful on them.

-Angela
post #57 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
We have kids of all sizes at my dd's school. The don't require a specific brand or style of uniform-- they only specify the colors of the tops/bottoms/dresses, and that it be modest (must have sleeves, a collar and be no more than two inches above the knee), and beyond that the kids can pick styles that flatter their shape. The Catholic high school that's close by-- they only allow blouses and pleated skirts for the girls and I do admit that they are not flattering. But then-- plaid pleated polyester skirts are pretty ugly no matter what.
Honestly, if they force them to tuck in their shirts.. then all of that is irrelevant.
post #58 of 138
At my children's school, they are not required to wear any certain brand,etc. Just light blue polos or the school tshirt and navy blue bottoms, no cargo styles or knit. A child could pick an a-line skirt, pleated skirt, plain front pants, a swirly navy skirt,etc. It does say shirts are to be tucked in but I have never seen them enforce that. The shirt tails of most polos don't tuck in well anyway.
post #59 of 138
I was a very chubby child/teenager and I still loved our uniform. :

Maybe I'm totally naive, but it really cut down on the who's cool and who's not.

Obviously, that does not count for every child - I'm merely stating my experience.

It was a lot less painful to not go to school in the $$$ designer jeans and warm up suits when no one else was. And because although we had a lot of choice, the uniforms all came from one store - so there was no one-up-manship.

Quote:
We have kids of all sizes at my dd's school. The don't require a specific brand or style of uniform-- they only specify the colors of the tops/bottoms/dresses, and that it be modest (must have sleeves, a collar and be no more than two inches above the knee), and beyond that the kids can pick styles that flatter their shape.
This best describes what we had to wear.

It would make me the happiest mama ever if dd was wearing a uniform to school this fall (she's starting JK); but only the private schools around here do, and there's no way we can afford to send her.
post #60 of 138
My answer to parents who want their kids to wear uniforms is to go to target and buy them uniforms - but don't try to force it on all the other families at the school.
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