or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › The BEST gun toy! Update!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The BEST gun toy! Update! - Page 2

post #21 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by princesstutu View Post
What an interesting definition of "silly".

Guns definitely glorify violence. Otherwise, we wouldn't need the speed and loudness of them.

Swords are sexy, so I only let my sons play with them. :
I don't get this at all... are you being facetious? It's hard to tell.

I don't get separating guns and swords, or bow and arrow... they're weapons, tools meant to injure game or opponents. Why in the world would one think that any particular weapon is any better or any worse when it comes to pretend play?

For the record, I have no problem with play weapons whether swords or guns.
post #22 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by meganeilis View Post
Guns are tools, in and of themselves there is nothing about them that glorifies violence. Condemning war games is one thing, but looking down your nose at target shooting is just silly.
I agree. I come from a long line of practical hunters. We fill our freezers, we use every piece of the animal. As a matter of fact, my mother still has (and uses!) a set of bone handled cutlery they had made from a moose one year.

Guns are tools. A piece of metal and/or wood designed to shoot a bullet at high speeds. What's questionable is what that bullet is being used for, and I got news for you, a bullet can't make that decision. The person holding the gun does.

I don't see how guns glorify violence. Violence comes in all forms. Tonight my daughter got hit in the head with a plastic car. I've seen anti-gun people spank their children. I've heard of objects, anything from cars, to plastic spoons, to rocks, being used as weapons. Violence, is violence, is violence.. it doesn't matter what object is being used, if an object at all.

I'm not anti-gun, but I am anti-violence. There IS a difference.
post #23 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post
I agree. I come from a long line of practical hunters. We fill our freezers, we use every piece of the animal. As a matter of fact, my mother still has (and uses!) a set of bone handled cutlery they had made from a moose one year.

Guns are tools. A piece of metal and/or wood designed to shoot a bullet at high speeds. What's questionable is what that bullet is being used for, and I got news for you, a bullet can't make that decision. The person holding the gun does.

I don't see how guns glorify violence. Violence comes in all forms. Tonight my daughter got hit in the head with a plastic car. I've seen anti-gun people spank their children. I've heard of objects, anything from cars, to plastic spoons, to rocks, being used as weapons. Violence, is violence, is violence.. it doesn't matter what object is being used, if an object at all.

I'm not anti-gun, but I am anti-violence. There IS a difference.
There's not one other thing on your list of possible "weapons" that you own for the sole purpose of causing injury or death.

Causing injury or death is violence.

Ergo, guns do equal violence.
post #24 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by meganeilis View Post
Guns are tools, in and of themselves there is nothing about them that glorifies violence. Condemning war games is one thing, but looking down your nose at target shooting is just silly.
This. I'd like own a gun for target shooting. I doubt I ever will, but if I did, it'd be kept locked separately from the ammo. So it wouldn't be a an option even for self defense. And I doubt live where I'd need to for protection from wild animals, and I don't hunt. So, no, it wouldn't be for violence.
post #25 of 149
*
post #26 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by polka hop View Post
To... cans and bottles sitting on a log? Oh, the humanity.
The poster to whom I was replying was not using her guns for shooting cans and bottles on a log.
post #27 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by meganeilis View Post
Guns are tools, in and of themselves there is nothing about them that glorifies violence. Condemning war games is one thing, but looking down your nose at target shooting is just silly.
Then I guess, according to you, I'm silly.

I don't care what an article says, I'm not allowing gun toys into my home.

I am not interested in raising fodder for the military or prison industrial complexes.

If my kids want to hunt, we can discuss that, but there's absolutely no way that I would ever allow my children to play with something that resembles a handgun.
post #28 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jwebbal View Post
I have read that article and disagree wholeheartedly with it. I will not let my son play guns, nor swords for that matter.
Just curious how you are going to stop him without shaming him if he really wants to pretend a stick, or his finger, or his penis is a gun? What about if he pretends a stick is a knife for cutting up something, then pretends a bigger stick is a bigger knife? How on earth do people control that (leaving aside why would they want to control their child's play)?

What about if your child wants to build a trebuchet? Would you deny him that fine physics experiment because it is a weapon for knocking down castle walls? (We built one out of tinker toys ). Would it be ok if he built it but then didn't try to knock down blocks with it?

I'm wondering how many of the anti-gun crowd have gotten through age 5 without their children (especially boys) playing with guns? I'm sure some have because I'm sure there are boys with a temperament that don't find guns appealing but most seem to.
post #29 of 149
Oops... misquoted
post #30 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post
I'm wondering how many of the anti-gun crowd have gotten through age 5 without their children (especially boys) playing with guns? I'm sure some have because I'm sure there are boys with a temperament that don't find guns appealing but most seem to.
Yesterday we went to our county fair. There was a kid's ride with swings that were kind of submarine-shaped with two seats in each swing -- one facing forward and one backwards. Each seat had a black pipe attached that could be aimed at the other swings as a pretend gun.

Honestly, I didn't even notice the "gun" until after my 4.5 year old son was on the ride or I would have steered him toward a different one. As it started turning, he yelled, "Hey mom, what's this supposed to be?"

I had to TELL my son that it was a pretend gun -- he didn't have a clue because he's never been exposed to them. We don't watch tv or movies with guns. His preschool doesn't support weapon play.

I don't believe that making guns out of everything is innate in children. A child who has never seen or heard of a gun isn't likely to start pointing his legos and yelling "Bang, bang, you're dead!" And the idea of a child using his penis as a pretend gun is really nauseating to me.
post #31 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by l_olive View Post
I don't believe that making guns out of everything is innate in children. A child who has never seen or heard of a gun isn't likely to start pointing his legos and yelling "Bang, bang, you're dead!" And the idea of a child using his penis as a pretend gun is really nauseating to me.

Maybe your son is different from some other boys? They are not all the same, you know. My son was never exposed to guns and started shooting things with hangers at 2. We do not own guns, video games or have cable TV.
We do not watch any violent movies, even when DS is not present. He does not go to school or daycare, and his friends are all being raised in very non violent homes as well.

We are anti war pacifists, and it was very upsetting for me to realize that violent play was something that my DS was interested in. To this day I still have no idea where he gets the ideas for this type of play. But I have learned to work with him so that he has a healthy outlet for it without feeling shamed.

So count yourself lucky...it is DEFINITELY normal for young children, especially boys, even if they haven't been exposed to guns and violence, to start shooting things. Believe me, we are experiencing it first hand in my home.

Every kid is different, so even if your son isn't doing it doesn't mean that other children aren't.
post #32 of 149
I should probably answer the other questions in your post, shouldn't I? Sorry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post
Just curious how you are going to stop him without shaming him if he really wants to pretend a stick, or his finger, or his penis is a gun? What about if he pretends a stick is a knife for cutting up something, then pretends a bigger stick is a bigger knife? How on earth do people control that (leaving aside why would they want to control their child's play)?
I would imagine that there are lines you draw in controlling your child's play -- they're just in different places than mine. If, in your child's play, s/he wanted to fling sand in another child's face, I would imagine that you would ask him/her to stop.

I don't allow mine to pretend to murder others with a plastic, stick, knife or penis gun. If he were to ever do that, I would simply tell him that I don't feel it's appropriate to pretend to kill his friends, and I'd like him to stop. Is that shaming him?


Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post
What about if your child wants to build a trebuchet? Would you deny him that fine physics experiment because it is a weapon for knocking down castle walls? (We built one out of tinker toys ). Would it be ok if he built it but then didn't try to knock down blocks with it?
I haven't heard of any accidental trebuchet deaths recently. Or kids taking trebuchets to school to kill their classmates or teachers. I think I'm OK with the tinkertoy trebuchet.
post #33 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubfam View Post
So count yourself lucky...it is DEFINITELY normal for young children, especially boys, even if they haven't been exposed to guns and violence, to start shooting things. Believe me, we are experiencing it first hand in my home.

Every kid is different, so even if your son isn't doing it doesn't mean that other children aren't.
I'm not sure how to ask this without sounding snarky, but I'm going to try because I'm seriously curious.

If the desire to shoot stuff is innate, what did children do before guns had been invented? I get that they played weaponry of other types, but it feels like it's being implied in this thread (and others in have particpated in) that a child who had never seen a gun can make a shooting device out of a hanger or pb&j sandwich.

I totally get that children have aggression and will play aggressively. My son has definitely done stuff like hit the dog and crash cars around. But make a gun up out of his imagination?
post #34 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by swimswamswum View Post
Then I guess, according to you, I'm silly.

I don't care what an article says, I'm not allowing gun toys into my home.

I am not interested in raising fodder for the military or prison industrial complexes.

If my kids want to hunt, we can discuss that, but there's absolutely no way that I would ever allow my children to play with something that resembles a handgun.
:
I love a hippy. I totally feel ya...

My dh convinced me that when children arent exposed to such things, they are more curious. If my son found a gun, I want him to know how dangerous it is. I certainly dont think everyone whos house he plays at is going to reveal to me if they have a gun in the house if I ask so I agree with dh that teaching him gun safety would be the safest thing to do.

That has nothing to do with the anti military thing though, thats just our stance on gun safety so our kid doesnt get hurt wwith a found gun or something.
post #35 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by polka hop View Post
To... cans and bottles sitting on a log? Oh, the humanity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by meganeilis View Post
Condemning war games is one thing, but looking down your nose at target shooting is just silly.
Most of condescending and "looking down on" posts in this thread are from those who would buy a toy gun for their child. No one said you or others were bad people they said that they would not buy a toy gun for *their* child. I don't see the point in calling a person silly because of their own personal parenting choices about the type of toy they allow in their own home.
post #36 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by l_olive View Post

I don't believe that making guns out of everything is innate in children. A child who has never seen or heard of a gun isn't likely to start pointing his legos and yelling "Bang, bang, you're dead!" And the idea of a child using his penis as a pretend gun is really nauseating to me.

my son did. At age 2 1/2 he had never been out of my sight and he started shooting a spoon.
post #37 of 149
Wow there is so much I could say. If my daughter wanted to pretend play with pretend guns, I would allow it -- we don't restrict play or forms of play here so long as everyone is a willing participant in said game and feels respected -- for instance I would not be cool with my daughter pretending to "shoot" someone who felt upset/scared/bothered/disrespected or who didn't want to participate in the game -- but that has nothing to do with a pretend gun and everything to do with respect.

I am a peace-lovin' pro-peace pacifist who is not a fan of violence but I am also evolved enough to know that an object only holds as much power to harm as the person holding the object has intention to harm. The exception being accidental shootings and no matter how much you protect your children (or think you are), when they get to a certain age you will not know who has access to what in their world so it is probably wise to have an open discussion regarding guns and what to do if they encounter one. Gee, what an allure it must be to be confronted with something your parents have built up over so many years to be a huge taboo that you could never explore in a safe, pretend environment. It *may possibly* be the reason most accidental shootings involve a child finding a parents' hidden firearm that they were never permitted to know about or explore (I don't mean physically exploring a gun, but rather exploring the issue of guns). You rarely encounter an accidental shooting situation in a more rural environment (not that it is unheard of) because typically children have a healthy respect of fireams at an early age... pretend gun play is less restricted, target practice (and hunting, though I am not a fan -- we are vegetarians) are more often a way of life (their family and neighbors are more likey to do it etc)....


My husband grew up on an 80 acre farm and had guns his whole life. You wouldn't know it to look at him, he is a gentle musician who is a peace -lovin', pacifist hippy himself -- but he is very much pro - (the right to have) firearms...

I can't believe certain people are suggesting that school shootings and the like are a result of allowing children to pretend gun-play or as a result of a parents' *right to bear arms* stance? More likely and more realistically, those events have vey little to do with "guns" and so much more to do with a culmination of a childhood of not feeling heard, of bullying, of depression or mental illness -- so many factors... and to just say, well sheesh if there were no guns stuff like that would never happen is, imo a very myopic and limited view and presents (imo) more of a set up for perpetuation of violence because the root problem is not addressed and an object of metal and lead becomes the scapegoat for a society who wants so desperately for *something* to blame rather than looking at their participation in a negative situation that led someone to feel that violence was their only way out. Pointing the finger at guns is easier than self examination I suppose.
post #38 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
Sorry, I still think that the "best" gun toy is no gun toy.

Me, too.
post #39 of 149
You can't tell me that kids just pretend to shoot at targets and that they don't ever pretend to shoot each other.

If kids never pretend to shoot each other, then there is probably no problem (in my eyes) with pretend guns. But if they pretend to shoot each other, ever, then that's treading on very thin ice because at some point, they might blur the lines between pretend and real. That's the danger of guns. You pretend to shoot someone and they don't die... the kids don't see any consequences that the "real thing" has. They become anesthetized to what happens because NOTHING about guns is real until they actually have one in their hands.

Someone gets shot on TV, and a few weeks later, they see the same person on a new series... gosh, shooting doesn't really kill people. You pretend to shoot your friend and he gets up and goes home at the end of the day. Not real.

I don't have a problem with shotguns and such used for hunting purposes only. But, you don't go out hunting with a handgun. And kids don't "pretend" to go hunting... they play cops and robber, etc.
post #40 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by transformed View Post
my son did. At age 2 1/2 he had never been out of my sight and he started shooting a spoon.
Well, OK then. I keep picturing little caveboys running around in their mammoth-skin loin cloths pointing antlers at each other and yelling "Kerpow, you're dead!"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › The BEST gun toy! Update!