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Book club: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle - Page 6

post #101 of 107
I'm currently about halfway through the book and am really enjoying it. Much of the information I have known for awhile, but some of it is new. Other parts just make sense the way she describes them, whereas before they did not to me.
I have to say that while we will not be taking a year-long local food only pledge, we have for sure changed what we buy based on this book. We bought a CSA share this summer and I was busy preserving fruits and veggies until about two weeks ago :
I was really interested (and saddened) to read that the "free range" chickens really are not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crunchie View Post
Any other vegetarians read the book and find Kingsolver's argument against vegetarianism interesting? I'm veg (I do eat eggs and dairy) and found it thought-provoking...the argument is one I've heard before, and it doesn't make me want to start eating meat or anything, but at the same time I do see the value in, say, preserving heritage livestock breeds (I raise breeds of chickens found on the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy's rare/endangered lists).
Yes, this is where I am with this aspect of the book as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
It is hard to eat totally local if you're a vegetarian - at least for me. There are no local sources for dried beans, soy, and grains - so it's hard to get protein. We do have our own hens so we get eggs.
Yup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Valkyrie9 View Post
What are some of the things you guys just couldn't manage without?
Bananas. We could *manage* without avocado and chocolate, but who would want to?
post #102 of 107
I'm so happy to see this thread! I've read it and love it! I've got my dh convinced on local foods as well.

We're doing really good so far, but some stuff I just can't give up. Yet!
post #103 of 107

Animal, Veg., Miracle

What an excellent book, I'm so excited for gardening season to start!

I’m nearing the end of AVM and trying to delay finishing it as I’ve loved reading it. I’ve read similar books (all of Michael Pollan) and was hoping someone could suggest some similar reads. Many thanks!

Also, I was wondering which recipes from the book are peoples favorites?
post #104 of 107
I'm such a late-comer... but I have to say, I both understood and was critical of the meat-eating justifications in A V M.

I became a vegetarian because I was tired of feeling like a hypocrite. If someone else can raise, (or hunt), slaughter, and butcher their own meat, good for them. But I can't. It's not in me to do. And I think it's morally wrong to let other people do the dirty work for me.

I also think it's morally wrong to support factory farming, for meat, eggs, or dairy. (Also for grain, but that, sadly, is d@mn hard to avoid.)

So would I prefer that people be veg, or that they make good decisions about what meat they buy? I don't care. Whatever works for you. I don't expect all people to give up all meat- cripe, there are people who must have it to live. I do think people should acknowledge that most Americans eat too much meat/dairy, and I do want everyone to vote with their dollars and their feet and buy ethically produced meat.

So I cannot criticize BK for putting her money where her mouth is.

I also comprehend the pragmatic aspects of animal-sourced food production and rare breeds- are we willing to see rare breeds eliminated? Are we willing to eat the individuals to save the breeds? And if we all stop drinking milk and eating eggs, what would happen to all those dairy cows and hens? Chances are, they'd just die out. Is that what we want? I have no answers, but these are fair questions.
post #105 of 107

Also a late comer!

Wow! How cool! I'm in the middle of reading this book and just happened across this thread. How exciting. I too have read similar books (Omnivore's dilemma) but nothing comes close to B.K.'s way with words. I love her writing. I think the things that I find most interesting is how a person can think they are being ethical in one respect (raw, vegan, vegetarian, organic) but how that ethical decision is actually leaving a larger carbon footprint than we could ever imagine. I'd love to chat more about this book!
post #106 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by coriander3 View Post
I think the things that I find most interesting is how a person can think they are being ethical in one respect (raw, vegan, vegetarian, organic) but how that ethical decision is actually leaving a larger carbon footprint than we could ever imagine.
This is what I LOVE about books like AVM. It challenges common assumptions. Just because something 'seems' better doesn't mean it is. I feel that shattering myths is as good thing, especially if it causes people to think deeper about solutions to complex problems. It's easy to say 'be veg to save the environment/animals', it's much harder to say 'in areas of rich farmland it makes more sense to be primarily veg, etc' kwim? It also challenges people to be less picky about food. It's hard to be picky eating seasonally. During the winter, it's root veggies or nothing. No strawberries or asparagus in December. lol

Ami
post #107 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesdtudentmom View Post
What an excellent book, I'm so excited for gardening season to start!

I’m nearing the end of AVM and trying to delay finishing it as I’ve loved reading it. I’ve read similar books (all of Michael Pollan) and was hoping someone could suggest some similar reads. Many thanks!

Also, I was wondering which recipes from the book are peoples favorites?
For similar books- I liked The $64 Tomato, Still Life With Chickens, The Have-More Plan, Heirloom, Better Off, Never Kiss a Goat on the Lips and depending on your political views Crunchy Cons.

I'm former librarian, or maybe just a book addict.

I loved this book and I led a book club on it. I also had my husband listen to it on CD during a long trip and he loved it too! We're planning on buying a ton of stuff at our farmer's market once it gets started. Craigslist is a good idea for finding local egg producers, or get in on a co-op. I found local eggs for $1.50 a dozen (if I bring my own carton) and local raw milk for $3 a gallon.... (shhh, I feed it to my... cat).
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