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Why do people feel the need to justify themselves (re: tv) - Page 3

post #41 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by devster4fun View Post
Otherwise, its cooking shows, home improvement and the weather channel.
: And the grand irony is... I am a TV producer/ writer (used to be director before DS) and work mostly for home improvement show and The Weather Channel
post #42 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by devster4fun View Post
I sometimes wonder about vehemently anti-TV folks with post counts in the 10's of thousands.
post #43 of 112
I agree that for some TV is an addiction. That would be a problem...as any addiction would. But all people who enjoy TV are not addicts and that includes kids.
post #44 of 112
I put that in to avoid the comments of: You need to monitor his TV/screen time.

When you ask for advice for a low-elec kid and get a page full of replies about monitoring screen time, it is annoying, unhelpful and exhausting.
post #45 of 112
Everything in moderation. Nothing wrong with a cookie or a bit of candy (DS is 6, not an infant) or a show he likes every now and then. He's a very active, healthy child, and we recognize that sometimes it's okay to just chill and watch 30 mins of cartoons after a long day. We don't force it on him, and he's just not the type to be "Distracted" by it either way.
post #46 of 112
I'm another one who doesn't feel any guilt. I tend not to be very controlling of my DS. He's a great kid and we have a lot of fun. He is not by any stretch neglected because he chooses to watch a DVD when he wants (we don't actually have any TV reception at home, but lots & lots of DVDs and some are not even educational).

I find it a bit funny that TV and video games are responsible for childhood obesity/inactivity but sitting at a desk 6 hours a day is just fine for a child's health. I'm referring only to restriction of movement, here, this has nothing to do with school vs. homeschooling so please don't anyone think I'm going in that direction.
post #47 of 112
TiVo or another DVR-type device is one of the best things to ever happen to kids and TV, IMO. For little kids, it means you can totally choose what they watch---we record my daughter's favorites (mostly things from Noggin or PBS, plus she loves the re-runs of "Magic School Bus") and she gets to choose from a "menu" of stuff when it's TV time. She gets one half-hour show in the morning and one in the evening (when we're winding down and headed toward bath/story/bed).

But the "control" feature about TiVo isn't the most important thing---to me it changes the whole nature of how we use TV. It encourages you to watch the one show and turn it off, since it's more like watching a video than just surfing the airwaves. No channel flipping, no watching something that you don't really love "just because it's on." Add that to the convenience factor of not being tied to the TV schedule and I think it's a fabulous tool for those who do use TV. I'm sure we actually watch less television with TiVo than we did without, since we catch our favorites and that's it.
post #48 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by hubris View Post
Not everybody agrees about that, but it's important to realize that some parents do feel that strongly about television viewing, and data does exist to back them up.
I don't agree with the data, most of which is anecdotal anyway. I've even read George Gerbner (Annenberg School) but while I think he is right, I really don't think it matters that much.

There is plenty of criticism of the studies that have been done.
post #49 of 112
I totally agree with one of the previous posters...people try to justify it because they know they will get flamed. I am an AP parent, and i let my kids watch TV. Do i think it makes me any less AP? Not at all. I dont care what anyone thinks about my kids watching tv, they are smart, well adjusted kids, which is more important to me than what others think. Yet i am sure someone will still have to comment about it because it is hard for people to understand something THEY dont believe in could possibly be okay. We all do things that others dont understand/believe in, and as long as WE as parents are okay with it, then it shouldnt be a problem. But most of the time it still is.
post #50 of 112
as far as data, you can always find some sort of "data" to back up ANYTHING if you look hard enough. Doesnt always mean it is right.
post #51 of 112
There are studies that show lots of things are harmful. For example, giving your child tons of sugar is harmful. So is TV in very large doses. But occasional TV and occasional sugar isn't going to hurt your child. It also depends on what kind of TV and what kind of sugar, KWIM? I think we can all agree that a daily diet of Pixy Stix and Jerry Springer is not the best for your child. But putting a little whipped cream over a bowl of strawberries and letting your kid watch Discovery Channel seems fairly harmless.

Sometimes I think people take hard-line stances on things just to make themselves feel superior to others.
post #52 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by waiflywaif View Post
TiVo or another DVR-type device is one of the best things to ever happen to kids and TV, IMO. For little kids, it means you can totally choose what they watch---we record my daughter's favorites (mostly things from Noggin or PBS, plus she loves the re-runs of "Magic School Bus") and she gets to choose from a "menu" of stuff when it's TV time. She gets one half-hour show in the morning and one in the evening (when we're winding down and headed toward bath/story/bed).

But the "control" feature about TiVo isn't the most important thing---to me it changes the whole nature of how we use TV. It encourages you to watch the one show and turn it off, since it's more like watching a video than just surfing the airwaves. No channel flipping, no watching something that you don't really love "just because it's on." Add that to the convenience factor of not being tied to the TV schedule and I think it's a fabulous tool for those who do use TV. I'm sure we actually watch less television with TiVo than we did without, since we catch our favorites and that's it.
Wow! We do the exact same thing...and I agree about the benefits of Tivo. We select what we want to watch and don'tend up watching junk. (Well, I like *some* junk, but I Tivo it and watch during DD's naps) Also, we skip through the ads which (IMO) are half the problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexysmommy View Post
as far as data, you can always find some sort of "data" to back up ANYTHING if you look hard enough. Doesnt always mean it is right.
Abso-frickin'-lutely. Having spent more than a decade in big pharma, trust me. Don't believe something just because it's in JAMA, NEJM, Scientific American etc... Even peer-reviewed journals have been wrong. Really wrong. Everyone has an agenda. If you dig deep, I mean really deep, you will find it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sushifan View Post
There are studies that show lots of things are harmful. For example, giving your child tons of sugar is harmful. So is TV in very large doses. But occasional TV and occasional sugar isn't going to hurt your child. It also depends on what kind of TV and what kind of sugar, KWIM? I think we can all agree that a daily diet of Pixy Stix and Jerry Springer is not the best for your child. But putting a little whipped cream over a bowl of strawberries and letting your kid watch Discovery Channel seems fairly harmless.

Sometimes I think people take hard-line stances on things just to make themselves feel superior to others.
To me, that's the bottom line. If you sit you DC in front of the TV for 8 hours a day, they might end up with some issues.

I do love Pixie Stix
post #53 of 112
See we don't have occasionalTV. We don't have occasional sugar either. We watch TV, in general, for a couple hours each day on the low end. We have sugar in our coffee and tea daily, and then maybe again in a dessert of some sort.

Sure some days we go without TV if we are super busy or involved in other things like company visiting, an outing, or etc but that's not the norm. I don't think my kids have been harmed at all by more than occasional exposure. No little one has ever been abandoned to the TV in our family or left completely alone to navigate sugar consumption without some helpful input. That's what matters, IMO.
post #54 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa View Post
I agree that for some TV is an addiction. That would be a problem...as any addiction would. But all people who enjoy TV are not addicts and that includes kids.
That's true. However, how do you know until after you've allowed them to become exposed to this potentially addictive behavior? We know that not everyone becomes addicted to cigarettes; but would we intentionally provide cigarettes to our kids in the misguided belief that they *most likely* won't become addicted to it?

As parents, it is our job to shield our children from harmful activities. Granted, nearly every kid in the world is, at some point, exposed to tv. But we as parents shouldn't be the "pushers". IMO.

That said, my objection to encourage tv viewing (including DVDs and videos) is only strong in the cases of children under 2 years old. Over 2 years of age is more acceptable IMO, because their brain synapses have had a little time to make the necessary connections, etc. It's still not ideal, no matter the age (partly because of the obesity link and ADD and etc.), but at least over 2 years old it seems more reasonable to let them watch.
post #55 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by sushifan View Post
Sometimes I think people take hard-line stances on things just to make themselves feel superior to others.
This is so true...about many other issues besides just tv!!

Even here on MDC...it is really too bad. We end up judging each other instead of collaborating.
post #56 of 112
Great thread! I don't have a chance to read it all now, so I'm subbing to remind myself to come back later and catch up ...

Please, oh, please: no one violate the UA! I'll be really : and if it gets pulled before I can come back.
post #57 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatbaby View Post
I think the thing that people don't realize when discussing TV is that it is addictive. We live in a society where we can talk openly about alcohol being addictive, or food, or heck even the internet. But nobody will admit TV is.
Sure, TV can be addictive, as can alcohol, cigarettes, WOW (which my husband IS addicted to), chocolate, the computer, etc.

Just because something can be addictive, doesn't mean someone who uses it is addicted.

I use the television. I'm certainly not addicted to it because I can go days without ever using it and not even care.

I have occassionally drank alcoholic beverages, but certainly can live without them.

Same goes for just about any other addictive item or substance.

As someone said, everything in moderation.

To suggest anyone who uses a TV is addicted is far from reality.
post #58 of 112
Well, I have avoided reading this thread until now because I generally don't read TV threads, but I finally broke over and read ALL THREE PAGES!

I will agree with the pp'ers who have mentioned moderation. We don't do a whole lot of anything (except reading books!) We don't watch a lot of TV (but, yes, some) we don't eat a lot of junk food (but, yes, we do make cookies and cupcakes together every now and then and on Fridays I allow them to eat **gasp** french fries and chicken nuggets). There are a lot of things that we don't do in our house that others see as just fine. There also are things that we do that others don't agree with. So, where is the line between being concerned about the children of our society and being a tyranical so-and-so who shoves their personal beliefs on everyone else? I'd say that, even on MDC this line is crossed WAY too often.

Generally, the qualifiers (ie we only watch educational tv, or only for an hour) are added because people have grown weary of being attacked over every topic imaginable from cutting your toddlers' hair to what food you should be feeding your dog (both of which I have seen people Royally Flamed for on this forum).
post #59 of 112
Shrug useless guilt!
post #60 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post
Same, here.

I was so glad when ds would actually WATCH tv! I got to dump him on the couch and GO PEE and BREW COFFEE instead of walking his 35 pounds around the house for an hour while he woke up. My theory is he doesn't want to watch much tv because he knows I want him to.
I laughed when I read your post. I only WISH my dd would watch tv for a little bit. A shower without huge messes when I got out would be nice, eating a sandwich without a tantrum would be nice, to sit and read 5 minutes without the book/magazine being torn from my hands would be nice, to make a two minute phone call in peace would be nice, if I can only have one of these things once a day, boy I can dream! Maybe someday she will watch a little tv. And no, I won't feel guilty. I also think she doesn't watch tv /v she knows I want her to. I don't see how watching 15 minutes of educational tv a day would hurt too much. I don't like the idea of kids vegging out for hours on end in front of a tv, but I don't think 15 minutes of tv a day will kill a kid or leave them mentally scarred for life.
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