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hs kids successful in later life, college, the work world?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm being interviewed for a local publication n very short notice, and have a long list of 20+ detailed questions about homeschooing and the homeschool group I started, that she wants TOMORROW!

The last question on the list was, "How are homeschooled kids successful in later life? College? The work world?"

What are your perspectives? Do you have any links to articles?

I'd love the help. Thanks.
post #2 of 15
Would these help?

http://www.stanfordalumni.org/news/m...schooling.html

http://www.post-gazette.com/regionst...omeschool5.asp
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks!

I submitted my stuff. Whew! That was well over a solid hour of typing answers to questions.

Since I'm not a homeschooling expert and my oldest isn't even 8 yet, I figured I could br brief on that last question.

I wrote:

Finally, how are homeschooled kids successful in later life? College? The work world?
Ivy League colleges are actively recruiting homeschoolers these days, and homeschoolers perform very well in college, as a group.
http://www.stanfordalumni.org/news/m...schooling.html
http://www.post-gazette.com/regionst...omeschool5.asp

According to Dr. Brian Ray, in a summary of his research entitled Homeschooling Grows Up, homeschool graduates are just as or more likely to go on to college as the general population, more satisfied in their work, happier with their lives overall, and more involved in civic affairs.
post #4 of 15
My husband was homeschooled from 1st grade up through high school. He's more knowledgeable than most of his co-workers (all of who went to public school). He seems to have a higher respect for the idea of government, as in he the need for government and the need for people to be active participants. As for work, well, he would like it better if he didn't have to work for idiots.

Crystal
post #5 of 15
I really want to homeschool... and that article from Stanford was excellent!
post #6 of 15
I'm a bit worried about this myself, I know two young adult former hsers and both are making EXTREEMLY poor social choices right now. It's that over-sheltered child gone wild thing. They are both making the sorts of mistakes that most us did in HS but w/o the accountability network of their parents to keep them in check. Yeah I know that young college kids from all backgrounds party and make poor dating choices to some extent, but these two kids seem especially vulnerable.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by natashaccat View Post
I'm a bit worried about this myself, I know two young adult former hsers and both are making EXTREEMLY poor social choices right now. It's that over-sheltered child gone wild thing. They are both making the sorts of mistakes that most us did in HS but w/o the accountability network of their parents to keep them in check. Yeah I know that young college kids from all backgrounds party and make poor dating choices to some extent, but these two kids seem especially vulnerable.
Hmmm...well there were a couple of girls I went to PS with who did the same thing. They were definitely *sheltered* even though they went to school and were in extracurriculars (orchestra, yearbook). This has a lot more to do with the sheltering then the homeschooling.
post #8 of 15
I loved how yesterday at the farmers market my 10 year old girl was helping out at the next booth selling hibiscus tea and lemonade. The owner came up to me afterwards and asked me if she can work his booth next year because he liked the way she treated the customers and gave back change so well. I was thrilled and so was she. So at ten, she is already getting an introduction to the work world so by the time she's older I imagine it will be a no brainer.


As far as college I can say the same. My husband is a art professor at a local community college here in town and my daughter chose to take it drawing class last year. Although her art work was no where near the skill level of the older students, she took it very seriously and did the work. I often hear about homeschooling kids taking college classed before they are college age. I think when it's their choice, they do well.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaWhit View Post
What are your perspectives? Do you have any links to articles?
My own family's story - with comments from my son, who's now in college, and my page of links that include some really good articles:
Teen Years, Homeschooling High School, College & Career Information

If you have time, try to get a copy of the updated version of Real Lives: Eleven Teenagers Who Don't Go to School Tell Their Own Stories, by Grace Llewellyn (Editor).The teens who wrote for the 1993 edition of this book have gone on to interesting adult lives, and have contributed updates on their lives. And Homeschoolers' Success Stories, by Linda Dobson: 15 Adults and 12 Young People Share the Impact That Homeschooling Has Made on Their Lives.

Lillian

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by natashaccat View Post
I'm a bit worried about this myself, I know two young adult former hsers and both are making EXTREEMLY poor social choices right now. It's that over-sheltered child gone wild thing. They are both making the sorts of mistakes that most us did in HS but w/o the accountability network of their parents to keep them in check. Yeah I know that young college kids from all backgrounds party and make poor dating choices to some extent, but these two kids seem especially vulnerable.
So, just as you would if those two were public or private school grads, you can just take a look and make note of how you won't raise your own. My son and his homeschooled friends weren't over-sheltered and never had reason to go wild. In fact, he mentioned to me that a lot of the kids in his dorm, school grads rather than homeschool grads, were doing just that - wheras he was there to get on with his education. Lillian
post #11 of 15
I"ve known seriously sheltered kids who were homeschooled and who went to public and private schools. It's definately got a lot more to do with the way that the kids are raised than where they [don't] go to school. Kids who have no freedom and don't get a chance to experience the outside world or a chance to know themselves have a really hard time in college. The freedom is too much for them, and like those fish that live on the bottom of the ocean under pressure, they explode when they lose all that structure. :
post #12 of 15
I know you submitted your things already

But my siblings and I are successful socially adjusted homeschooled adults

I graduated from college cum laude. I own my own business and am homeschooling my son.

My sister is a teacher and librarian at a private school. She's teaching a college level class for their advanced high school students.

My other sister works a professional job.
My brother is finishing his last semester at college majoring in city planning.

I like to say "there's not a nerd among us"
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3momkmb View Post
Hmmm...well there were a couple of girls I went to PS with who did the same thing. They were definitely *sheltered* even though they went to school and were in extracurriculars (orchestra, yearbook). This has a lot more to do with the sheltering then the homeschooling.
yeah but how do you HS w/o sheltering? Heck, protecting my dd from bad things that happen in schools is one of my primary reasons for hsing in the first place. Quite frankly I'm a very protective parent in general, I was raised by a lax parent and bad things happened to me as a result. How do you know if your child is getting enough freedom?
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by natashaccat View Post
yeah but how do you HS w/o sheltering? Heck, protecting my dd from bad things that happen in schools is one of my primary reasons for hsing in the first place. Quite frankly I'm a very protective parent in general, I was raised by a lax parent and bad things happened to me as a result. How do you know if your child is getting enough freedom?
You know I really used to worry about this a lot when my kids were younger (well, my ds still is *younger* IMO but I digress). I have found that as DD gets older she is letting me know when she needs more freedom and following her cues is all I really need to do. With the absence of peer pressure making her feel like she has to *fit in* by doing things she isn' comfortable with the breaking away process is feeling very natural to both of us. Like so much else in our lives (weaning, toliet training, sleeping alone) it works much better when we listen to each other as opposed to the artificial timetables of society. There is a difference between listening to and trusting your kids and limiting them. These girls I went to school with wanted to do more, could have done more and probably should have done more. They were limited by their parents, not protected. They were held back, not supported.

I removed DD from school, at least in part, to keep her from things like bullying and overwhelming peer influence. However, as she's gotten older I've seen that she is able to handle these things more. She is on a cheer team where she is the only hser. Believe me, there is no absence of drama! She can handle it now, she couldn't then. I find it no different then introducing solid food or sleeping alone. Just because she will have to do it someday doesn't mean she has to do it now. Just because she couldn't (or didn't want to) do it at 8 doesn't mean she never will be able to.

OTOH at almost 14 she's never stayed home alone. She's never had the desire to and doesn't feel *ready* for it. That's fine. She has time to get OK with it before she has to leave home LOL! People are usually shocked with I tell them this, as though when she turned 12 or 13 she should automatically be *old enough* to stay alone. I prefer to let her wait until we both feel she's ready regardless of age or what her peers are doing (and judging by the Psers in town that would be at age 9 or so).

That's how it's worked for us anyway!
post #15 of 15
Thanks 3momkmb, as I was reading this thread I was thinking the same thing as Natashacat. I loved your answer!
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