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Kids who wet the bed every single night, what's wrong?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
My two kids wet the bed everynight! the oldest is 8 now. I dont understand? shouldn't this have stopped by now? i made her a huge flat cloth diaper and i made a bigger pair of pull up diaper cover out of a shower curtain. it works great but she wakes up wet, stinky, and pee burnt. my son does as well, he is a bit younger.

they are very happy children with alot of love in their life. i dont understand?

could there be some other medical problem?
post #2 of 20
Wetting the bed can be physiological, small bladder syndrome, peryasis (sp? bladder muscle freezes up when they try to go, it's psychological). It can also be genetic as well (or so "they" say). Hubby wet the bet until he hit the age of 12 because of small bladder syndrome (the bladder doesn't grow at the same rate as the rest of the body and leans to the small side causing frequent urination, wetting the bed during deep sleep, ect).

It could also be that they sleep very deeply and don't feel the urge to go, it doesn't wake them up.

All of the above happens to my oldest DD, my oldest DS grew out of it not to recently.
post #3 of 20
I um, wet the bed until the age of 9. Not every night, but certainly enough to be ashamed. I'd steal towels from the hall closet and sleep on them. I remember my parents being angry with me, but I honestly couldn't help it. I had problems when I laughed.

Fast forward about twenty years and I had some "issues" during my pregnancy as well. I guess it's just how I am built. Maybe it's the same for your little ones. Just please don't draw too much attention to it, I bet they feel pretty embarassed already.
post #4 of 20
I thought you might find this interesting/informative:

Research: Chiropractic and Nocturnal Enuresis

In some cases children respond very well to chiropractic care. You might want to check into it more.
post #5 of 20
post #6 of 20
I wasn't implying there was a mental problem...pyriasis is psychological because they try to urinate but they "freeze up" (however that word is spelled). I have the same problem...running the tap helps relax me so I can go (the sink tap or bathtub tap).

Physiological = physical
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetangelbrynlie View Post
they are very happy children with alot of love in their life. i dont understand?

could there be some other medical problem?

This is what I was refering to, reasuring her that there is nothing she is doing or not doing that is the cause of this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheal View Post

Physiological = physical
NSS
post #8 of 20
I've heard that there's some process that happens in our bodies where they stop making urine at night. I know this is true with me. I can drink a big glass of water, go to sleep for 12 hours, and not wake up to pee. But if I wake up for longer than a couple of minutes I'll start feeling that "urge". Anyway, this process happens early, and in others late. There's not much you can do besides wait, reassure them that it's normal, and teach them to change their own sheets.

I never "night trained" my son, one day at 3 he just started waking up dry and that was that. My best friend had the same experience with her daughter, only she was 11.

I'd probably check with you ped, because I know there are other things that can play a role (like those mentioned above), but in the vast majority of cases it's just waiting for their body to mature.
post #9 of 20
My oldest son wet the bed until his was probably nine. He is such a deep sleeper, I don't think a full bladder ever woke him up. We were getting to the point that we were chaning his sheets every day. We tried to not be upset with him b/c we didn't want to make him feel bad. The beautiful thing is that he outgrew it. He is now 11 and hasn't wet in at least 1 1/2 years. Our 4 year old, who used to be dry every night as a baby and would sleep with out a diaper, now wets all the time. Many nights we sneak a diaper on him so that we won't wake up in a wet spot. I have faith that he will grow out of it also.

I don't know if this is "normal' but what is normal? I just know we wash the sheets alot and in the next few years we will probablyl buy a new mattress!

CR
post #10 of 20
I bought a bedwetting alarm when DD was 7. It worked wonderfully. I think she just slept so deeply that her brain didn't get the message that her bladder was full and the alarm really helped with that. Before I bought it I was sure that it was just a gimmick but I decided to take a chance anyway. It helped DS too. My only regret is that I wish I had bought it sooner.
post #11 of 20
Could it be a food allergy? I'm not sure if this is true, but I remember my mom saying kids with milk allergies can be more prone to wet the bed. Not sure about this, but it might be worth looking into?
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetangelbrynlie View Post
My two kids wet the bed everynight! the oldest is 8 now. I dont understand? shouldn't this have stopped by now? i made her a huge flat cloth diaper and i made a bigger pair of pull up diaper cover out of a shower curtain. it works great but she wakes up wet, stinky, and pee burnt. my son does as well, he is a bit younger.

they are very happy children with alot of love in their life. i dont understand?

could there be some other medical problem?
Bedwetting can be nothing more than a physical immaturity in their brain. really. My son did this until he was 10, with no medical reason. he even had a sleep study overnight to see if there was a problem.

I joined a small board relating to long term bedwetting and really, it is often a simple matter of "not there yet". If you are comfortable with a doctor telling you he is not having any physical problems, give it time.

They do have sensor alarms for it, but the jury is out on how they work long term.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilkTrance View Post
I um, wet the bed until the age of 9. Not every night, but certainly enough to be ashamed. I'd steal towels from the hall closet and sleep on them. I remember my parents being angry with me, but I honestly couldn't help it. I had problems when I laughed.

Fast forward about twenty years and I had some "issues" during my pregnancy as well. I guess it's just how I am built. Maybe it's the same for your little ones. Just please don't draw too much attention to it, I bet they feel pretty embarassed already.
: Except I was older.

Ds has meatal stenosis and that contributes a lot to his bedwetting. I think my history is another part of the issue-he just inherited my tiny bladder.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheal View Post
It could also be that they sleep very deeply and don't feel the urge to go, it doesn't wake them up.
:
I think that's it for my 4.5 y.o. *sigh* He goesandgoesandgoes and then just crashes hard for 11 hours.
post #15 of 20
Some kids stop wetting the bed when offending foods or additives are removed from their diets.

In the meantime, help them feel comfortable with their bodies and clean up the pee as discreetly and sensitively as possible. I used to change my own PJs and then put a towel down on the bed and go back to sleep- there's no need to change sheets in the middle of the night. If she's getting "diaper rash" from your homemade cloth diaper and covers, maybe look into getting a more breathable "diaper cover"- maybe wool or arcylic fleece PJ bottoms that work as "diaper covers" but are breathable, and then "nighttime undies" that are as absorbant as diapers.
post #16 of 20
Dd was dry for almost a year, until we traveled. Then she was wetting every 7-10 days. Dh started taking her to the bathroom around midnight, because he felt sorry for me having to change her and put down towels in the middle of the night. She wakes up enough to say something unintelligible to him just before they get to the bathroom.

Now if he doesn't take her, she dreams that he does, and practically every time he misses the midnight mark, she talks in her sleep as if she thinks he's carrying her, and a moment later, she goes. If I'm lucky, I hear her and pull the blankets out from under her if she's rolled on top of them!

We have genetic late nightime dryness, so we're just waiting until tincture of time fixes this.
post #17 of 20
There is nothing wrong with your kids.

If the cloth diaper isnt working well, try investing in some Goodnites (Pullups for older kids)...my son (almost 11)uses them every night, and hasnt had any problems from rash or being "burnt" by pee. They usually keep the bed dry, too, although occasionally they will leak and he'll wake up in a big puddle.

They will outgrow it. I did.


Katherine
post #18 of 20
Hello~

I too wanted to let you know that you are not alone! My son is almost 7 and still has accidents. We have seen a urologist and everything came back okay - he really just doesn't wake up at night as he is such a sound sleeper.

I would definitely recommend an appointment with your pediatrician just to have him evaluated and ensure that there isn't any problems - sometimes they have a bladder that doesn't empty all the way, but more frequently their little bladders just haven't grown enough yet.

Here is a tip that might help you. We were changing the sheets all too frequently and I found that everyone was getting frustrated... not because he was having accidents, but because of the work involved in cleaning up. My son started not telling us and then we would find smelly sheets. So I sat down and explained that we understood that he might have accidents sometimes and it was okay. I also purchased 2 hospital grade bed pads that is soft on one side and vinyl on the other - if he has an accident all he has to do is throw the pad in the wash and he gets a new one out. This has really helped a lot.

I have also found that food/drinks can play a factor in more frequent accidents. We try to avoid alot of artificial sweeteners, soda, caffiene, etc. This doesn't eliminate it totally, but it definitely helps!

I have also considering buying the bedwetting alarm - it's a watch that has an alarm and it goes off if it senses the start of needing to go potty. I just haven't taken the leap to spend the money as I am worried it won't really help (it's over $100). Here is a link: http://www.bedwettingstore.com/Bedwe...ing_alarm.html

Good luck!!
post #19 of 20
I have a question for those who place a pad on the bed (and don't use Goodnights or the equivilant) - doesn't your DC still get the blanket or comforter wet? Or do they not sleep with anything heavy on top of them?

My DS#1 (who has NEVER not wet the bed) likes to sleep under a heavy blanket and comforter. If he doesn't wear Goodnights, I end up with 1 1/2 loads of laundry from just one night (not to mention the occasional ruined pillow). If I thought not using the Goodnights would help, I'd try it again, but I can't see doing an extra 10 loads of laundry every week for no good reason.

He has a camping trip coming up in November, so I am going to see if he wants me to buy an alarm for him to try that and see if it helps, but I won't do it if he is very opposed.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by gillibean View Post
I bought a bedwetting alarm when DD was 7. It worked wonderfully. I think she just slept so deeply that her brain didn't get the message that her bladder was full and the alarm really helped with that. Before I bought it I was sure that it was just a gimmick but I decided to take a chance anyway. It helped DS too. My only regret is that I wish I had bought it sooner.
My experience with a dd who wet the bed at six was exactly the same. The alarm worked incredibly well. This was a kid who wet the bed every single night of her life. Within a week of using the alarm she was dry all night. She actually asked me why I hadn't gotten the alarm sooner.
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