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Does your 6yo know these things? - Page 2

post #21 of 122
Since you are asking about 6yo's, is this the list for FIRST GRADE?
At first, I thought maybe you meant SIXTH grade, because in my preggo-induced haze, saw the 6 and thought 6th grade...but now I'm seeing 6yo, which means 6 YEARS OLD, or basically, first grade, right?


(Cuz I was gonna say my 6th grader doesn't know most of that stuff..... )

Really, that is the list for first grade? Seriously?


I remember looking through that book once and being annoyed. Now i remember why.
post #22 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by famousmockngbrd View Post
homonym: words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings, i.e. too, two, to

I am a total language geek.
Heheheh -- I was sloppy & must've edited while you posted: thanks!

I did know the 1st two, just not homonym (or its correct spelling) ...which is why I will not be an English teacher
post #23 of 122


Bottom line, who really cares what they are called - as long as the kid understands the concept. I guess it's nice that they are called *something*, so that we can discuss them without having to say "words that sound the same but have different meanings" all the time, but really who does that, anyway.

We could just start calling them SSDMs.
post #24 of 122
Okay, I finally looked it up! She begins with a chapter called "The Truth About Curricula" "Or, There is No Such Thing as a First-Grader." And a quote from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Universe: "Don't Panic." During the next few pages, she says things like:
"One of the primary advantages of homeschooling is the ability to bypass the decreed norm."

"When it comes to curricula, kids should always come first. It's not what teachers teach that's important; it's what children learn - and what children learn best is what interests them, what they want and need to know."

"Many states require that homeschoolers keep step with the public school curricula and demand proof - in the form of written assessments and tests - to ensure that they are indeed doing so. Colleges, though increasingly enthusiastic about accepting homeschooled students, often require a specific battery of high school background courses. Fo all these reasons, it's to homeschoolers' advantage to be familiar with the general course of the standardized educational curriculum. The basic curriculum, however, should be used as a reference point and a guideline rather than a set of predetermined assignments. In many cases, there are equivalents and alternatives to the courses described here; and parents should adjust and adapt to best meet the needs of their own children."

"The standardized curriculum can indicate academic areas in which kids need extra help and support - or creative substitutes and alternatives, or stress-reducing periods of being left alone. Variation, though, is normal, and our many individual differences are what make the world the interesting place it is. Kids are natural learners, and each will find his or own best way to learn. There are many roads to educational Rome."
This is much more in tune with the conversations I've had with her - she didn't mean that book as a guide to what they "should" know at whatever ages, but a guideline as to what the traditional "standardized curriulum" is among school systems.

Lillian
post #25 of 122
I don't have a six year old, but my nearly-five knows about 80% of that stuff. That said... he's very, very strange that way.
post #26 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by famousmockngbrd View Post

homonym: words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings, i.e. too, two, to

I am a total language geek.
That's a homophone. A homonym are two words that sound and look the same, but different meanings - cleave, cleave. Pen, pen.

Former linguist here.
post #27 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyGrace View Post
That's a homophone. A homonym are two words that sound and look the same, but different meanings - cleave, cleave. Pen, pen.

Former linguist here.
A homonym and a homophone are the same thing.
post #28 of 122
Do I sense a dictionary coming...? :

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/homonym
Quote:
hom·o·nym

1. homophone
2. a word the same as another in sound and spelling but different in meaning, as chase “to pursue” and chase “to ornament metal.”
3. (loosely) homograph.
4. a namesake.
5. Biology. a name given to a species or genus that has been assigned to a different species or genus and that is therefore rejected.

—Synonyms
1, 2, 3. Homonym, homophone, and homograph designate words that are identical to other words in spelling or pronunciation, or both, while differing from them in meaning and usually in origin. Homophones are words that sound alike, whether or not they are spelled differently. The words pear “fruit,” pare “cut off,” and pair “two of a kind” are homophones that are different in spelling; bear “carry; support” and bear “animal” are homophones that are spelled alike. Homographs are words that are spelled identically but may or may not share a pronunciation. Spruce “tree” and spruce “neat” are homographs, but so are row “line” and row “fight” as well as sewer “conduit for waste” and sewer “person who sews.” Homonyms are, in the strictest sense, both homophones and homographs, alike in spelling and pronunciation, as the two forms bear. Homonym, however, is used more frequently than homophone, a technical term, when referring to words with the same pronunciation without regard to spelling. Homonym is also used as a synonym of homograph. Thus, it has taken on a broader scope than either of the other two terms and is often the term of choice in a nontechnical context.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/homophone
Quote:
hom·o·phone

1. Phonetics. a word pronounced the same as another but differing in meaning, whether spelled the same way or not, as heir and air.
2. a written element that represents the same spoken unit as another, as ks, a homophone of x in English.

—Synonyms See homonym.
post #29 of 122
Or should I say, AN homonym.

And I am compelled to add, "...doo doooo, doo doo doo..."
post #30 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by famousmockngbrd View Post
A homonym and a homophone are the same thing.
No, similar, but different.

Homonym (same+name) -

: one of two or more words spelled and pronounced alike but different in meaning (as the noun quail and the verb quail)

Homophone (same+sound)-

: one of two or more words pronounced alike but different in meaning or derivation or spelling (as the words to, too, and two)

eta: A homonym. The "h" is pronounced, negating the use for "an".
post #31 of 122
See, now....?? Fortunately this is not the kind of thing that gets discussed in everyday life.

ETA: except for here.
post #32 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by famousmockngbrd View Post
See, now....?? Fortunately this is not the kind of thing that gets discussed in everyday life.

ETA: except for here.
Why fortunately? I like this type of work! My 8yo had a page to do today on cognates - finding out what it said in Portuguese based on his knowledge of Spanish and Latin. The more rules and parts of speech we know, the better our language is!
post #33 of 122
That is an example of applied knowledge... your DS is able to identify root words, suffixes, prefixes, etc. based on his understanding of the language, not what these things are called. If you know "homo" means "one", for instance, and can decipher a word's meaning based on that, yet not know what that word part is called, you have gotten the useful part of the knowledge, IMO.

BTW... I stil maintain that homonym and homophone are the same thing. :
post #34 of 122
Some yes, some no. And thank God. His sweet brilliant mind is so busy learning info that is important and relevant to his life and interests at this time.

mp
post #35 of 122
Is this seriously what public schooled 1st graders know?
How many of us knew this stuff in 1st?
These I knew -
- Count to 100 by 2s, 5s and 10s
- Use tally marks for counting
- Understand place value for 1s 10s and 100s
these I had a vauge understanding of -
- The world's major oceans, continents, and northern and southern hemispheres
- Three major kinds of rocks
-the meaning behind symbols such as the flag, the American Eagle and the Statue of Liberty
- Know about famous Americans - Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Susan B. Anthony, etc.

Why are kids being pushed so hard so early?

BTW, my 6 yo knows none of these. We have discussed many of the things on the list, but he certainly couldn't take a test on them.
post #36 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelKnee View Post
Is this seriously what public schooled 1st graders know?
I think it's just the schools' wish list of what they'd like to see 1st graders know by the time June rolls around. But we all know that the reality of the situation has always been far from their ideal - especially now with the No Child Left Behind craziness driving everything!

- Lillian
post #37 of 122
Thread Starter 
In defense of Rebecca Rupp, I don't get the sense that she is saying that kids should know all this. But just the fact that it is listed under first grade kind of makes me : . I don't know the three types of rocks. I couldn't define homonym. I don't know a lot of stuff on that list.

I guess my question wasn't so much about being worried that he didn't know that stuff, but wondering if we're somehow missing a huge chunk of important knowledge. We go about our days dancing and talking and cooking and playing and reading and every once in awhile I go "Uh oh, did I forget to educate the children?"
post #38 of 122
A big to Lillian regarding Ms. Rupp's intentions.
I love that book for all its resources. I've bought quite a few of the books she recommends.

I think this age is all about exposure. My DS has heard the word "igneous" (he likes volcanoes). He knows a bit about some things, more about others. We've read a book or two about the Statue of Liberty, I'm sure by "meaning behind the flag" they mean why there are 13 stripes and 50 stars. There is no agreed upon meaning beyond that (except for maybe why those colors were chosen) as everyone has their own ideas. I'm fine with him knowing what opposites are and that there are words that sound alike but mean different things at this point. I don't know why schools find the words antonym etc. so essential. I mean really, why would all 6 year olds need to know that?!

If I see her book the mention of literary terms like setting, plot, etc. I might make a point to use one of the words when talking to DS (not in a forced way but just replacing what I would normally say--fi, "you might like this story's plot, it's about...") or I might not. I'm not going to go out of my way to make sure he knows those terms though. If it can't come up casually and naturally and in an interesting way when he is all of six years old then it can't possibly be that important.

That's why I like that she recommends so many fun books. The storybook Two Ways to Count to Ten got across the concept of counting by twos to my DS after 2 readings. Or at least it was after 2 readings that I heard him counting by 2s to 20 in the car and then starting at 1 and counting by 2s with odd numbers.

It's really a good book when used as a list of resources.
post #39 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauradbg View Post
Sedimentary
Igneous
Metamorphic
:

Guess when I learned that...

that's right--this year when reading a book to my homeschooled children. Ha!
I just (re)learned this last week. Same reason. (I took geology in high school. I'm sure I knew it for a test once upon a time. )
post #40 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoalaMama View Post
I just (re)learned this last week. Same reason. (I took geology in high school. I'm sure I knew it for a test once upon a time. )
And from the time I learned the names of the 3 rock types in 6th grade until I took a distance university geology class (where I set the pace and did not have to cram), I could have probably told you the three rock types but would not have had a clue what the difference was between them! Kind of like, until fairly recently, I could have told you that the Battle of Hastings was in 1066 but not know any more info beyond that. I had heard of William the Conqueror of course, but would not have known what he had to do with the Battle of Hastings. Who knew keeping my DS out of school would make me a little less ignorant every day?!

Oh and the university level geology course (this was a real univesity too, not just for distance learning) did not assume students had studied any of it before. I would have been better off taking one or two community college classes per term in place of 4 wasted years in high school.
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