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Santa Claus: yes or no? - Page 8

Poll Results: Santa Claus: yes or no

 
  • 61% (164)
    Yes
  • 27% (75)
    No
  • 10% (29)
    Other (not sure of what an other might be, but I'm sure someone has one!)
268 Total Votes  
post #141 of 160
No, no easter bunny or tooth fairy either. Not only do we not celebrate those holidays but we don't lie to our kids.
post #142 of 160
We do Santa. My dad used to read to us the Night Before Christmas every Christmas eve, and he reads it to the grandchildren if we're there, or calls and reads it to them. It just makes me feel all warm and nostoligic. (yup, I'm getting teary eyed just thinking of it. ) For me, at least, it is a family tradition that I loved so much growing up, that I wanted to share it with my kids. Though, I have to admit, I'm not very good at it. I often have to correct myself about who gave the kids what. So I usually do the, "What do you think?" when they question me, and we talk about how Santa shows us the spirit of giving.
post #143 of 160
The Magic Reindeer Food (recipe listed above) should be perfectly safe for animals (unless the red hots really cause a problem, I but I would not think so). The 'chocolate' that is used is 'white chocolate' (which is NOT chocolate at all, and therefore not dangerous for dogs).

The question had asked, and I thought I would answer.

It is a cute idea, but since we don't do Santa, we don't do reindeer.

I find it a little sad that so many think my children are losing out on something 'so special'. And that we are doing something so bad by focusing on 'religion' rather than Santa and magic.

We have such wonderful times of Christmas. Such 'magical' memories. And yes, we know that it is not the actual day of Jesus's birth, but it is just a day that we have chosen to celebrate His birth. And I, in turn, find it sad that so many children are deprived of celebrating Christmas with all the spiritual significance that we do. The wonderful times, the wondrous memories, the family, the fun. It is all part of our celebration. We don't need Santa to have the Magic.
post #144 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidzaplenty View Post
I find it a little sad that so many think my children are losing out on something 'so special'.
Quote:
And I, in turn, find it sad that so many children are deprived of celebrating Christmas with all the spiritual significance that we do. The wonderful times, the wondrous memories, the family, the fun. It is all part of our celebration. We don't need Santa to have the Magic.
I find these two parts of your quote to be a little...inconsistent.

I don't feel sorry for your kids because you don't do Santa. I think that would be incredibly arrogant. I do Santa with my kids because Santa carries special memories for me. (DS1 figured it out a long time ago, and wasn't mad at all...and he now enjoys playing along with the little ones.) We don't need Santa to have the magic, either - but he's part of my "wonderful times, wondrous memories, the family and the fun".

OTOH, I think it's equally arrogant to feel sorry for my kids because they're "deprived" of the spiritual significance that Christmas holds for you. We're not a Christian family. Christmas, for me and mine, is a cultural and family holiday, which holds all kinds of memories and special significance for us. Please don't waste your energy feeling sad for my "deprived" kids, and I'll do you the same courtesy.

If you're going to feel sad that other kids are deprived of your celebration, don't be upset that others feel the same way about your kids. We all come from different backgrounds, have different traditions and carry different memories, and none of us have a lock on the "right" way to celebrate Christmas.
post #145 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romana9+2 View Post
I still get presents from my mom from Santa.
There are occasional "Santa" gifts under the tree at my mom's place, too. She's got three kids, three kids-in-law, 2 step-kids. The youngest of all of us is 30 and she still does this sometimes.
post #146 of 160
So perhaps my wording was not understood in the manner it was meant.

I am constantly bombarded on so many fronts by people feeling sorry for my children because we don't 'do' Santa. And when they begin pushing the idea that my children are so 'deprived' of tradition and magic of the season, I can not help but to think of how sad it is for their children to be 'deprived' of what my family has found.

I do not feel sorry for 'all the children' that are so deprived. If people wound not push their 'sorrow' on me, I would never even think about their children that way. Christmas is a personal time of year for my family. A time of family and a time of fun. But we are generally the 'odd ones out' because we don't 'do' Santa and I get the sympathy for my children EVERY year by nearly EVERYONE we know IRL, even family! UUGGGHHH! It is just frustrating!
post #147 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma Aimee View Post
here is the recipe for magic reindeer food -- note it is written to be printed up FOR THE CHILD --



have some fun --
I am defintely making that, my dd loves white choc. I bet it would taste good with chocolate instead of white choc. too. It might end up looking more like reindeer poo than food though.
post #148 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I find these two parts of your quote to be a little...inconsistent.

I don't feel sorry for your kids because you don't do Santa. I think that would be incredibly arrogant. I do Santa with my kids because Santa carries special memories for me. (DS1 figured it out a long time ago, and wasn't mad at all...and he now enjoys playing along with the little ones.) We don't need Santa to have the magic, either - but he's part of my "wonderful times, wondrous memories, the family and the fun".

OTOH, I think it's equally arrogant to feel sorry for my kids because they're "deprived" of the spiritual significance that Christmas holds for you. We're not a Christian family. Christmas, for me and mine, is a cultural and family holiday, which holds all kinds of memories and special significance for us. Please don't waste your energy feeling sad for my "deprived" kids, and I'll do you the same courtesy.

If you're going to feel sad that other kids are deprived of your celebration, don't be upset that others feel the same way about your kids. We all come from different backgrounds, have different traditions and carry different memories, and none of us have a lock on the "right" way to celebrate Christmas.
I have to admit I picked up on that inconsistency also. But I think that maybe she was feeling attacked and was feeling a bit defensive about it. We celebrate with Santa, but I certainly wouldn't feel that anyone's elses celebrations were any less special if they didn't. We are still adding and changing our family traditions, so who knows what my kids will carry on to their families, but I do hope that they will carry on the love of giving and being with family no matter how they celebrate it.
post #149 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidzaplenty View Post
So perhaps my wording was not understood in the manner it was meant.

I am constantly bombarded on so many fronts by people feeling sorry for my children because we don't 'do' Santa. And when they begin pushing the idea that my children are so 'deprived' of tradition and magic of the season, I can not help but to think of how sad it is for their children to be 'deprived' of what my family has found.

I do not feel sorry for 'all the children' that are so deprived.
I think we'll just have to agree to disagree. The fact that you think those children are "so deprived" is telling...whether you state that you feel sorry for them or not. I enjoy the Santa tradition and our family has fun with it. Yours doesn't. That's fine. Feeling that other children are "deprived" because their family has different traditions is arrogant...on either side.

Quote:
If people wound not push their 'sorrow' on me, I would never even think about their children that way. Christmas is a personal time of year for my family. A time of family and a time of fun. But we are generally the 'odd ones out' because we don't 'do' Santa and I get the sympathy for my children EVERY year by nearly EVERYONE we know IRL, even family! UUGGGHHH! It is just frustrating!
Being the odd one out sucks, and I'm sorry you get crap about the Santa thing. I don't understand people like that.
post #150 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by race_kelly View Post
We are still adding and changing our family traditions, so who knows what my kids will carry on to their families, but I do hope that they will carry on the love of giving and being with family no matter how they celebrate it.
:
I completely agree with this.

Santa or no Santa, religious significance or no religious significance - Christmas is a very special time for my family, and I know we're very fortunate to have each other.
post #151 of 160
We kind of do Santa (voted 'other').

Santa brings one gift (unwrapped) for dd, and fills the stocking.

Other gifts are labelled as to who they're actually from.

We're a bit eclectic in our celebrations: I'm a non-practicing Catholic, current agnostic, dh is pretty much atheist, but we both enjoy pagan rituals.

So yeah, a bit of everything gets tossed in - mass with my mother, Christmas Eve secular bonanza at the inlaws, Solstice celebrations at our place...

Dp and I intend to answer any questions about Santa/Christmas spirt gently and honestly, along the lines of 'What do you think?' and go from there...

I was eleven or twelve when my parents finally had to break it to me that they were Santa, and boy was that a tough convo! I never once held it against them though, I just remember being in awe that they were so good at what they did!!
post #152 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by nursemummy View Post
We kind of do Santa (voted 'other').

Santa brings one gift (unwrapped) for dd, and fills the stocking.

Other gifts are labelled as to who they're actually from.
That's us, too, except that the gift from Santa is wrapped.
post #153 of 160
No, because
1) I do not want to ever tell my children something I don't believe to be true.
2)I think it takes away from the Christ child story.
3) I think it's deplorable when people use the Santa card as manipulation.
post #154 of 160
I voted no. We're Jewish.
post #155 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by warriorprincess View Post
3) I think it's deplorable when people use the Santa card as manipulation.
I'll just add that, as someone who has been doing Santa for 14 years, I completely agree with this. I hate the "be good or Santa won't come" crap and all the rest of it. If you're going to jerk your kid's Christmas out from under them, then at least admit that you're the one doing it. One of the most heartbreaking things I ever saw was when a couple of ds1's friends from school came over, and ds1 was showing them the stuff from his Easter basket...and one of the girls said to the other one, "yeah - he got stuff, but the Bunny didn't come to our house, because you were bad"... ...and the other little girl apologized to her sister.
post #156 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
:
I completely agree with this.

Santa or no Santa, religious significance or no religious significance - Christmas is a very special time for my family, and I know we're very fortunate to have each other.
yes, definitely!
post #157 of 160
Quote:
I'll just add that, as someone who has been doing Santa for 14 years, I completely agree with this. I hate the "be good or Santa won't come" crap and all the rest of it.
Agreed!!
post #158 of 160
Yes and no. We are not actually talking about Santa ourselves, but we do read books that have Santa and Ds has seen some cartoons that have Santa. We may occasionally ask something like "Do you think Santa will come? What do you think Santa might bring you?" I don't want to lie, but I guess I'm trying to slip by on a technicality.

We are going to the IL's for the holidays, so we will have to see what they say. We may float like this for another year before explaining it as using our imaginations.
post #159 of 160
we are not Christian and won't be doing santa and have not celebrated xmas in years. my partner is agnostic and i am panthiest. i voted other and not no because we have our own holiday we celebrate every year that we made up called t-rex day and because i like the idea of santa that a magical being brings presents and i like the idea of giving presents anonymously we do those things but not with santa instead my partner and i make something up every year that would be funny to say had snuck into the house and left gifts and thats what cards are signed with when my child is old enough i will ask my child to make up something to bring gifts and to be part of that. the first year it was t-rex who snuck into our home and left gifts which was fun and is why we call it t-rex day. the other big thing about t-rex day is that the gifts are small and are ideally hand made. we also have a "buying holiday" which means we wait for sales that happen after xmas and after new years and get one big fun thing for the whole family or a big thing we all need. i hope that soon we can et a piano for the buying holiday but probably not for a few years this year we will probably get something less expensive and more needed maybe something for the kitchen.
post #160 of 160
My kids know Santa isn't real, but Santa is still part of our Christmas celebration. They watch the TV shows about Santa, we have Santa books, the presents in their stocking are "from Santa." They know we're pretending, but it's still fun.

That's what my parents did. Same with DH. So it was a no-brainer for us what we'd do about Santa.

Santa is part of the cultural celebration of Christmas. I see no reason to cut Santa completely out of the picture. But I'm not comfortable with lying to my kids no matter how fun it is. I think we've found a happy medium.

I kinda wish Santa was real.
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