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What are the don'ts of pregnancy? - Page 3

post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by PixieAlly View Post
Sorry but BLECH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL

Ally
How about trying the nitrite and preservative free hot dogs, and cook them well! Those Applegate farms chicken dogs are sooooooo good. So are the 365 brand at Whole Foods.
post #42 of 66
For those worried about mercury:

http://www.gotmercury.org/

There are lists of dangerous fish, and a mercury counter... good stuff to keep you from going crazy.
post #43 of 66
Regarding sushi, my midwife explained it like this ... listeria lives on the outside of wet things. That's why soft cheese (unpasteurized) is a concern, and hard cheese is not (although she agrees the concern over soft cheese is overblown, and made it sound like there was a single incident with unpasteurized cheese a while back in California that caused all the fuss). So with sushi, if the fish is contaminated with listeria, it will be on the outside of the fish. At most sushi restaurants, they don't cut the fish until just before it's served, so the inside of the fish will be "clean". Whereas the sushi at a grocery store has been cut up for a while, so there's a chance the "inside" of the fish has been exposed to the bacteria, and the bacteria has had time to colonize. So she gives a thumb's up for sushi from a reputable restaurant, and a thumb's down to raw sushi from a grocery store.

She also said she doesn't think deli meat is often of concern, with the exception of super cheap, "mixed" meat (a bunch of different meats, or meats from different parts of the animal, all ground together).

I do agree that it's wise to educate yourself about the possible toxins and contaminants in fish, though (I'm talking things like mercury, PCBs, etc., not listeria). There is lots of info on the internet. Also, Whole Foods claims they rigorously test their fish for contaminants, so if you want to cook fish at home, you could go there and talk to someone behind the fish counter about their testing standards, etc.

I think our western culture loves to scare women about pregnancy almost as much as about birth .
post #44 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by PixieAlly View Post
Sorry but BLECH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL

Ally
I think they are good and once you put ketchup,mustard cheese and a bun around it you can barely tell the difference! FYI-I would cook them on a grill or in a pan, they will be more "BLECH" if you microwave or boil them!
post #45 of 66
I eat whatever I want. I eat healthier over all, but there are no "no nos" as far as I'm concerned, specifically because I'm pregnant. I drink, but only a single drink if I do, and not that often. I don't smoke because I think its nasty regardless, and I don't do drugs because I don't feel comfortable with the effects of them on my body and mind (both the negative and intended).

But yes I drink. I have had a beer while watching football, or just before bed after not having slept well in 4 days. I seldom get raw sushi, only because we havent had the "fun money" to go to our sushi restaurant, and the only place thats inexpensive doesn't sell raw sushi but I havent even gone there in months and months.

I eat whatever cheese I want, although I don't generally eat much beyond mozzerella and cheddar. I don't like deli meat, but I'm sure I've eaten a subway sub in the past 8 months. I don't eat chocolate because it makes me ill this pregnancy, and did not have any other kind of caffeine for most of the pregnancy for the same reason. I might have cut down if only to make room for the healthier liquids I need to drink (if I'm thirsty I have crystal lite or similar, if I want a caffeinated soda I will have a soda). I still don't drink coffee of any kind because I got violently ill after having a cafe mocha and cant bring myself to smell it without getting nausious.

IMO the food scares are just a fear tactic and for the most part unfounded. Various parts of the world have no problem with most of these things (including alcohol - France and others and sushi - Japan etc as well as soft cheese I'm sure) US culture is so based on fear that it doesnt suprise me that they think all of these things are 'evil'. But then, these are also the people who are terrified of the effects of my child having a pacifier or breastmilk after 6 mos, or seem to think DD will be sleeping with us through college because we let her spend the first 2 yrs of her life in our bed.
post #46 of 66
don't go on a super-long road trip when you are more than 7 mos. pregnant. especially in a car that is low to the ground. the vibrations may cause your little one to flip! that's what happened to me with my first.
post #47 of 66
My MIL is Japanese and she says they don't give sushi (sashimi) to pregnant women or child under 20. She said kids don't eat it because 1.its expensive and 2. it can make them sick. And Pregnant women don't eat it because its not good for the baby.

I'm not arguing for or against eating sushi, I'm just saying according to her, her family and all of her Japanese friends pregnant women don't eat sushi.

Is she just making this up?
post #48 of 66
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/15/opinion/15shaw.html?ex=1342152000&en=95967c31f42f5f2c&ei=5 090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss


Chicken of the Sea

By STEVEN A. SHAW
Published: July 15, 2007

WHEN my wife was pregnant with our son, her obstetrician gave her a list of food dos and don’ts. Chief among the don’ts: alcohol, unpasteurized cheeses and raw fish. Meanwhile, every French mother I know consumed alcohol and unpasteurized cheese in moderation during her pregnancy, and my friends in Japan laugh at the notion of avoiding sushi when they’re expecting.

Indeed, in Japan, eating raw fish is considered part of good neonatal nutrition. The Japanese government is fanatical about public health, and Japanese medical scientists are among the best in the world. You can be sure that, were there documented complications resulting from pregnant women eating sushi in Japan, there would be swift government intervention. Yet, in the United States, it is taboo for a pregnant woman to eat raw fish.

But this isn’t because scientific research has concluded that unborn children have been damaged by sushi. Rather, it’s because the speculative risk of food-borne illnesses, especially parasites, has captured the public imagination.

There are several reasons, however, that these fears are unfounded.
While Americans tend to associate raw fish with sushi and Japan, we have been eating raw seafood for centuries — namely, oysters and clams. And it is these raw mollusks, not the fish typically used in sushi, that are responsible for the overwhelming majority, about 85 percent, of seafood-related illnesses. As the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine concluded in a 1991 report on illness from eating seafood: “Most seafood-associated illness is reported from consumers of raw bivalve mollusks. ...The majority of incidents are due to consumption of shellfish from fecally polluted water.”

If you take raw and partly cooked shellfish out of the equation, the risk of falling ill from eating seafood is 1 in 2 million servings, the government calculated some years back; by comparison, the risk from eating chicken is 1 in 25,000. (Over all, 76 million cases of food poisoning are reported a year.)

The main risk of illness from non-mollusks isn’t from eating them raw. Rather, as the Institute of Medicine reports, the problem is “cross-contamination of cooked by raw product,” which is “usually associated with time/temperature abuse.” In other words, no matter what you order in a restaurant, if it’s not kept at a proper temperature and protected from contamination, you’re at risk.

Conversely, if the restaurant follows good food safety practices, there is little to worry about. Having been inside the kitchens of dozens of restaurants of all kinds for research, I can say that Japanese kitchens are, on the whole, the cleanest, the most careful and the most conscientious in the business. Moreover, sushi bars are out in the open for all to see, and anybody who has spent a few minutes observing a sushi bar and a typical American diner’s griddle area can tell you which type of restaurant has higher standards of cleanliness.

Sushi may not be cooked, but it has, for the most part, been frozen. Food and Drug Administration guidelines require that before being served as sushi or sashimi (or in any other raw form), fish be flash-frozen to destroy parasites. While the fish you see in the sushi-bar display case looks fresh, it has almost certainly been frozen at some point in the distribution system. This freezing kills any parasites as sure as cooking would.
Most species used for sushi don’t have parasites anyway, though. Fish like tuna are not particularly susceptible to parasites because they dwell in very deep, very cold water, and sushi restaurants typically use farmed salmon to avoid the parasite problems wild salmon have. Most of the fish likely to have parasites, like cod and whitefish, aren’t generally used for sushi. Nor does pregnancy increase susceptibility to parasites. Healthy women who’ve been eating sushi are not at increased risk when they become pregnant. The same resistance and immunities function before, during and after pregnancy.

But rational analysis doesn’t hold sway with the pregnancy police.
“Why take any risk?” they ask. The medical establishment and the culture at large have twisted logic around to the point where any risk, no matter how infinitesimal, is too much. So powerful is this Puritanical impulse that, once a health objection is raised, however irrational the recommended behavior, it’s considered irresponsible to behave any other way.
There’s a temptation to say there’s no harm in this type of thinking. Women should simply not eat sushi for nine months; surely that’s no big deal.

But there are problems with this approach. For one thing, between the warnings about parasites in sushi and about mercury in certain species of fish, pregnant women are being scared off fish altogether. And that’s bad news, since the fatty acids in fish are the ideal nourishment for a developing baby.

For another thing, the sushi ban is insulting to Japanese culture. It speaks of ignorance and prejudice to reject one of that culture’s basic foods based on unfounded health claims. And perhaps most important, pregnancy should be a time of joy, not stress. The result of an over-regulated pregnancy is fear and negativity. Perhaps the best antidote would be to relax with a salmon roll and a nice sake.
Steven A. Shaw is the author of “Turning the Tables on Asian Restaurants: The Insider’s Guide to Chinese, Japanese, Indian, Korean and Southeast Asian Dining.”
post #49 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsnv View Post
My MIL is Japanese and she says they don't give sushi (sashimi) to pregnant women or child under 20. She said kids don't eat it because 1.its expensive and 2. it can make them sick. And Pregnant women don't eat it because its not good for the baby.

I'm not arguing for or against eating sushi, I'm just saying according to her, her family and all of her Japanese friends pregnant women don't eat sushi.

Is she just making this up?
Maybe it depends on where you're from in Asia? I remember when I was pg with Isadora and we were at a sushi restaurant. I asked the waitress what pg women eat in Asia and she said, "Sushi, what else?"

It's just like in France. Do you think pg women over there give up unpasteurized cheese?! NO WAY.

And I agree with a previous poster...you're probably more likely to get some nasty bug from eating at a salad bar.
post #50 of 66
The soft cheese thing specifically refers to UNPASTURIZED (raw milk) cheeses. This is the one that really kills me during pregnancy. But lots of places (like Trader Joes) sell pasturized milk versions of soft cheeses like brie, chevre etc.

Incidentally, listeria apparently takes something like 60 days to develop, which is why it's not too big a deal once you're in the 3rd trimester.

As for mercury, a study just came out recently (written up in today's NYT) that pregnant women who eat 340 g of fish/week or more had babies with higher IQs. Just do your best to avoid the high-mercury fish like mackrel (yuck), tilefish, etc. If you eat tuna go for the chunk light.

Deli meats are fine as long as they're heated to steaming before you eat them. Just to kill off the surface bacteria. So open-faced toasted sandwiches are fine.

Sushi - same thing. Eat the cooked stuff. Once you get to 3rd trimester I'd say as long as you're eating at a reputable joint you're fine.

Alcohol - keep it to 1 drink per week, and less during first trimester.

My sister got SERIOUS food poisoning while pregnant with her son (from something that should have been fine - her husband got sick too) and she was worried, but everything turned out fine. It was just unpleasant for a couple days
post #51 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkmoro311 View Post
Try the SmartDogs - their tofu, very tasty!
Seriously, I am definately NOT a tofu type of girl, but these SmartDogs rock. They are really good. I recommend boiling them the old fashioned way rather than microwaving.
post #52 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamond lil View Post
Seriously, I am definately NOT a tofu type of girl, but these SmartDogs rock. They are really good. I recommend boiling them the old fashioned way rather than microwaving.
I tried those a while back (at least I am pretty sure that was the brand) and thought they were pretty bad. It's the liquid smoke that grosses me out.

Trader Joe's sells yummy hotdogs w/o nitrates.
post #53 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shanana View Post
Regarding sushi, my midwife explained it like this ... listeria lives on the outside of wet things.
For the sake of saying it- if you cut into something, the knife draws things from the outside of food to the inside of food.

Im avoiding salad bars and such too. I know someone who has lost a baby to listeria and in the long run, my peace of mind is worth giving up my precious premade salads and cold deli meats no matter how miniscule the risk. While these are some of my favorite foods, I really don't find it to be an inconvenience. I substitute with fresh salads made entirely from scratch (which are amazing and can't really compare to anything!) and baked chicken sandwiches. I was never a big fan of real sushi, I dig the veggie stuff so it's been no skin off my back.

I will enjoy a turkey sandwich from subway dripping in sweet onion teryaki sauce postpartum, though


The hot bath thing, too. I don't know about you, but my tub is toooooo tiny and shallow to let the water get anywhere near my belly. With so much dry surface area, it takes a pretty hot bath to get me to sweat (or really raise my temp at all, and yes I have done experiments with this for S.A.G). I guess it begs to be said to be careful of how hot your jacuzzi gets.

Essential oils, if you're sensitive to them- some common ones are emmenagogues and abortifacients and if you've ever used essential oils to regulate your cycles (with success) you might want to delve into that and see if you are comfortable using them while pregnant. Another subject with views on both sides, totally up to your discretion.

Everything is, really, besides the obvious.. just do your research until you feel happy with whatever decision you make, and then just stick to it.
post #54 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Organicavocado View Post
I will enjoy a turkey sandwich from subway dripping in sweet onion teryaki sauce postpartum, though
I made a list for DH while PG with #2 of things I wanted postpartum.... he teased me, because it kept getting longer, and crazier, the closer I got to delivery. I had heartburn SO bad ... a lot of things were off limits.

My list was:
Chai Latte ... had one at 0700 after DD#2 was born!
Hot wings
Sushi
and .. and apple martini ....
post #55 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkmoro311 View Post
I know I just hate when you hear comments from women who say things like "I drank 2 cups of coffee a day during my pregnancy and my child is just fine."
I do drink 1-2 cups of coffee per day---and frankly--I was a little insulted by what you wrote above. I don't think it's that big of a deal---you're not supposed to consume more than 300 mg per day or 3 6oz cups
http://parenting.ivillage.com/pregna...e_47ml,00.html
With an almost 3-yr-old and a fulltime job working for a financial services institution I frankly--would not survive without my coffee.

It comes down to this argument; use your judgement; if a restaurant is less than clean and the workers are touching their faces and not washing their hands, turn around. Go to a reputable dining establishment and/or grocer. Make sure you know the sources of your food, cheese included. Do the research and relax. More fetuses are harmed by stressed out parents than cheesed-out parents. Be moderate and use all of your senses when making a decision regarding the health of your child--that wisdom will carry you through the acual task of parenting--which is much more complicated than trying to care for a baby in utero. If you attack parenting with this expectation that you do everything perfectly and by the book you will feel perpetually guilty and inadequate. Do what you can--within reason and never stop living in the moment with all of your senses and intuition at work.

By the way--that doesn't mean I don't exercise caution---I avoid the deli sandwiches and the sushi and certain cheeses--but I draw the line at coffee. You have to decide what is comfortable for you.
post #56 of 66

did someone say coffee?

I tried to quit and essentially recreated my personality into a miserable distrught individual. While we have been TTC for 5 months now with no bfp, i can't believe that coffee is the reason - I drink 1/2 - 1 cup per day. That's it. And it's the difference between my being an upbeat, generally good natured person that can balance the busy modern life and my being a disgruntled PITA. I choose the 1/2 cup. I was nervous about it for a while, but, like pp said, with life being what it is, i would not survive without my coffee. It's a natural high with more benefits than negatives. just my 2 cents.
post #57 of 66
goodness gracious me...

i um, eat sushi, including tuna. soft cheeses -- woo wooo! a glass of beer or wine at night. coffee in the morning.

baaaaad mommy.:
post #58 of 66
In general, even when not PG or BFing, I don't eat any fish or drink coffee. I gave up my once-daily Diet Coke when I got PG with DD and I'm much healthier for it.

PG don't on my list include:

Don't obsess about every little twinge, or everything that could go wrong
Don't think you must change your lifestyle dramatically just because you're PG. Yes, you're going to be someone's Mom, but that doesn't mean you have to stop being yourself!
Don't watch The Baby Story shows on TLC
Don't listen to people's horror stories


I'm sure there's more!
post #59 of 66
Thread Starter 
Besty I like those
post #60 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndigiorgio View Post
I do drink 1-2 cups of coffee per day---and frankly--I was a little insulted by what you wrote above. I don't think it's that big of a deal---you're not supposed to consume more than 300 mg per day or 3 6oz cups
http://parenting.ivillage.com/pregna...e_47ml,00.html
With an almost 3-yr-old and a fulltime job working for a financial services institution I frankly--would not survive without my coffee.

It comes down to this argument; use your judgement; if a restaurant is less than clean and the workers are touching their faces and not washing their hands, turn around. Go to a reputable dining establishment and/or grocer. Make sure you know the sources of your food, cheese included. Do the research and relax. More fetuses are harmed by stressed out parents than cheesed-out parents. Be moderate and use all of your senses when making a decision regarding the health of your child--that wisdom will carry you through the acual task of parenting--which is much more complicated than trying to care for a baby in utero. If you attack parenting with this expectation that you do everything perfectly and by the book you will feel perpetually guilty and inadequate. Do what you can--within reason and never stop living in the moment with all of your senses and intuition at work.

By the way--that doesn't mean I don't exercise caution---I avoid the deli sandwiches and the sushi and certain cheeses--but I draw the line at coffee. You have to decide what is comfortable for you.
I really could had used any example. But my point was how do you know that what you consumed during pregnancy did not effect your child. FYI- Apples are more effective for energy boost in the morning!
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