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Is it legal to refuse the part where a nurse has to carry your baby to your car? - Page 3

post #41 of 115
Yeah it isn't minor to me either.

I'm glad the hospital where I transferred with my first isn't like that.
post #42 of 115
at my daughter's birth, they said it was about liability. I couldn't carry my baby anywhere but in the hospital room. if i was going to hold her going out to the car, then i had to ride in a wheelchair. if i dropped her or fell while holding her, the hospital said they'd be liable. like a nurse is more stable than i am.

bah! another reason why homebirth is better!
post #43 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamamidwife View Post
at my daughter's birth, they said it was about liability. I couldn't carry my baby anywhere but in the hospital room. if i was going to hold her going out to the car, then i had to ride in a wheelchair. if i dropped her or fell while holding her, the hospital said they'd be liable. like a nurse is more stable than i am.

bah! another reason why homebirth is better!
I would be rather tempted if they said that to ask them who's liable if the nurse drops the baby. And mention that I would sooo sue them. Then see who got to hold the baby... But that wouldn't be very nice, I suppose.

Hopefully I'll never have to worry about it.
post #44 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bluefish View Post
Yeah, cause it just *that simple*
I know it's not always or even often that mamas wishes are respected in hospitals (I've had enough experience to demonstrate that), but in terms of 'letting,' the permission comes from me, not the other way around. Then, actions without my consent are reasonably understood to be violations of my consent- which they are. So, whether or not I give permission is as simple as my decision; whether or not my decision is respected may not be. It took a very, very adamant husband (who was willing to physically restrain beligerent staff and/or walk out with babe if necessary) and midwife to keep our children from harm in the hospital. I am not saying it is easy!!!

My contention was with the tyrannous language used in this thread by both those who perpetuate it and those who have been abused by it- not at all mamas whose wishes were violated. I expressed some of my philosophical objection to the medical industry's view and assumed authority over human beings they choose to call 'patients' and treat likewise instead of human beings who come to them for consultation, service and equal status as beings and ultimate decision-making power over their own lives. I have met one doctor in my whole life who acts according to this wholistic view, who sees herself as another human being in consultation with those who come to her practice. I am confident that even knowing one dr like that is extremely rare, sadly.
post #45 of 115
Unless I deem it necessary, I will refuse to ride in a wheelchair.

If they tell me I have to bring the car seat up to the room and carry the baby down in it, I will laugh in their faces. We are using a convertible seat, and there is no way in Hades that we are hauling that thing up to the 16th floor and then carrying it down and attaching it into the car with a baby inside.
post #46 of 115
I agree with UBA2C that the language is very disturbing.

Right now in my area, if you don't want to be treated like a subservient being you have to have a homebirth. So for all of those people who need to be in the hospital (for whatever reason) they must be subjected to this kind of behaviour.

Let's face it, hospitals are set up for their own convenience, profit and ease of operation, they are not set up to give people good emotional experiences. And if I had a TRUE medical emergency, I surely would want them to be moving with the greatest of efficiency so I may let some things slide.

But, wait, most women who are at the hospital for their births are not in medical emergencies, they are just going through a normal physiological process. So why are their emotional (and oftentimes physical) needs completely disregarded??? Well, there is a long history involved in that but as long as women are buying into the system, it most likely will not change.

As UBA2C so rightly points out, we do have a RIGHT to informed consent and we are consumers!! We are the customers, not the dogs.

And I do want to add that it is nice to be taken care when you have just had a baby. And we modern women are not accustomed to be being taken care of the way we should be after birth. Yes, most of us can get up and walk after birth, but we shouldn't have to. I'm all for people babying moms!!! I think it's ideal for this to occur in her own home where she will most often feel more comfortable. In an ideal world we should all be holding our babies and not be required to do much walking after birth.

But I find it highly offensive that an institution would presume to impose upon women such ridiculous restrictions as not allowing her to carry her own newborn to the car or in the hallways or to walk home if she chooses to.
post #47 of 115
hmm, i've never heard of that before. my dh carried our little one to the car. i even asked if i had to ride out in a wheelchair and they laughed at me and said they didn't do that anymore
post #48 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ackray View Post
Oh and we hardly ever wheel the mom out in a wheelchair, if she can't walk, maybe she shouldn't be going home.
I've never been released from a hospital or been there when anyone else was released from a hospital where they didn't wheel you out, no matter WHAT condition you were in. I mean, if you walked into the ER and walked out without being admitted, then no wheelchair... but every surgery I've ever had (two on my knee, one gynecological, one cesarean), plus when my mom was released from the hospital after each of her breast-cancer-related surgeries (9 of them), when my cousin was released after both of her cancer-related surgeries, and when my father was released after a battle with congestive heart failure... EVERY SINGLE TIME, they used a wheelchair. And my first three surgeries were outpatient. It's all about liability; they're still responsible for you until you are in your own car or off hospital property. I've never wanted to refuse or known anyone who did, so I don't know what they'd say.

BTW, my various experiences include at least four different area hospitals... one Kaiser facility (3 occasions), one university hospital (two occasions), one private hospital owned by monstrous hospital corporation that gets sued right and left for good reason (2 occasions), and one private hospital frequented by celebrities and other rich folks (9 occasions). All were in Los Angeles County.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eksmom View Post
This was the policy at the hospital where DD was born. They encouraged us to take her for a walk in the hallways, so we did what any normal parent would do - my DH picked her up and held her and we went for a walk. You would have thought we'd committed a felony... the nurses got all freaked out and we were told that we had to have her in the bassinet, we could not hold her and walk the halls in case we fell.
Our hospital had the same policy, but didn't ever try to tell us it was a liability issue. Instead, it was part of their security system. All the parents were instructed that the babies have to be in the bassinet anytime they're out of the hospital room; all the nurses, doctors, whoever know this... so whoever DOESN'T know it, and is seen carrying a baby in arms down the hall, is suspected of baby-napping. They had the Lo-jack thing on DS's ankle, too, but by the third day it was slipping right off because he'd lost so much of his IV fluid bloat.

Come to think of it, the wheelchair may be part of the same security system, since they don't exactly want you taking the bassinet home with you ;-).
post #49 of 115
oops....double post
post #50 of 115
I know at our hospital we have to escort the mother and baby down to make sure the parents have a car seat. Though it is against hospital policy for the nurses to put the baby in the car seat or install the car seats. (liability issues) If I see something obviously wrong though...I can´t in good conscience NOT say something and help them correct it.

It´s also policy that either the nurse carries the baby down or that the baby be in moms arms and wheeled down. I figure I can trip and drop a baby just as easily as anyone...so I usually encourage mom to just carry the baby and be wheeled down. I´ve never really had anyone refuse.

Should someone refuse and want to walk...I honestly don´t have the time and patience to sit there and argue with them about hospital policy. When it comes down to it...itś their kid and you can´t keep them there...and really I think CPS and social services have better things to deal with. These stupid policies are in place because something happened at some point in time and someone sued. All I can do is document what happened the best I can. Itś not to cast the parents in a bad light...but to protect myself.

Worse case...If a mother, father whoever wanted to carry their baby down and tripped fell and dropped the baby then tried to sue...I would have documentation to cover myself. If I´m walking with the baby and drop it...I´m screwed. So I would just rather not carry your baby. If your baby is going to be dropped...it will most definitely not be me that did it. All the nurse can do in that sort of situation is document, document, document...unfortunately we are bounded to stupid policies and CYA mentalities. It makes me really hate nursing sometimes. It just seems to me that the hospital would be in more trouble if a nurse dropped the baby rather than the mother. Especially if the mother was the one that insisted she walk. I don´t see why itś okay for the nurse to carry the baby...but the mother needs to be in a chair.

Ideally a mother should be allowed to carry her baby down however she sees fit...but should she fall and drop the child...should the hospital be liable for that? (assuming itś not due to a safety issue, like wet floors or something like that?)

And to answer the OP...No this isn´t a state law...more than likely it is a hospital policy. You can refuse.
post #51 of 115
The wheelchair thing bugs me. They're fine and dandy if you NEED them but if you can walk just fine? What's the point of them?

When I went into labor I walked into the ER, and had to wait for about ten or fifteen minutes until I managed to get the attention of the admitting nurse. I told her I was there for L&D, and she asked if I was related to the patient. I was confused and told her *I* was the one in labor. At that point she didn't even realize I was in labor, but as soon as she did, she panicked and ordered me into a wheelchair. Umm, if you can't even TELL I'm in labor, don't you think I'm capable of walking to the elevator myself? Especially when I just walked several blocks from your parking lot?! There is no way anyone could have gotten me to sit in a wheelchair on the way out either, as I felt fine. But when I was transferred from one hospital wing (the birth center) to another (maternity) minutes after giving birth, well then yeah, I accepted the ride. On the other hand, when I was in transition and with back to back contractions, I managed the same walk just fine with no wheelchair.

I think a wheelchair, personally, is demeaning and humiliating unless you really need it. That's just my opinion, but hey, I think I have a right to my opinion.

I remember DH carried the baby in the bucket seat; I would have been fine carrying the baby by himself but the heavy seat and awkward angle would have been too much. Honestly I don't remember fighting them on the issue, nor do I remember anyone pushing it. I think a nurse suggested we bring the car seat up, but I don't remember anyone saying it was the policy. No one checked to make sure we got in the car OK. I remember feeling like we were stealing the baby, I kept thinking someone was going to come after us and tell us we couldn't leave. It felt so strange to be walking out of there.
post #52 of 115
Yeah the wheelchair thing really really bugs me too.

I have been in the hospital many times, and the only time I've been wheeled out is when I had abdominal surgery and had trouble walking. Any other issue and I walked out. My husband had nasal surgery and walked out.

I don't see why a hospital would insist on a wheelchair to leave, but one can walk around before they leave. Even when I had abdominal surgery, I could walk around, etc, but it was difficult.

truemists reminded me- when I had my first baby in the hospital, no one even walked us out. We checked out at the nurse's station, and that was all.
post #53 of 115
My big issue with the wheelchair is that it's used for moms who have just given birth.....there is nothing wrong with you....you just had a baby but you're not sick or recovering from major surgery (except for C-sections) so why are you treated like you are??

I suppose if they treated pregnancy and birth like it is a normal healthy process throughout the whole experience then the wheelchair would seem dumb but since they treat you like you are sick and the baby needs to be rescued from your body the wheelchair fits right in. That to me is very demeaning!
post #54 of 115
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post #55 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimibell View Post
I suppose if they treated pregnancy and birth like it is a normal healthy process throughout the whole experience then the wheelchair would seem dumb but since they treat you like you are sick and the baby needs to be rescued from your body the wheelchair fits right in. That to me is very demeaning!
I agree with that. When I took my little ride in the wheelchair in-hospital though I was glad for it because I was VERY tired. More than tired. I felt like I was on drugs. (Wasn't.) I just felt like I wasn't even really in control of my body yet. Apparently it was several hours after giving birth but I was still totally in a trance. I think they put the baby in my lap but I honestly don't even remember that... :
post #56 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildflower View Post
This kind of upset me last time, they told me that I had to let a nurse or employee carry my newborn out of the birth center room to our car, like to verify that the baby had gone to the right family, or maybe to mkae sure had a car seat or some such?
I've never heard of such a think!! I had a hospital birth and a birth center birth and neither happened. I *did* have to take a wheelchair to the door in the hospital, but that is SOP with all hospitals with all patients afaik. They insisted that *I* carry my baby though (not like I was arguing, )
post #57 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by truemists View Post
The wheelchair thing bugs me. They're fine and dandy if you NEED them but if you can walk just fine? What's the point of them?
I always thought it was a liability issue...like if you trip on your way down the hall you can sue the hospital. It never bothered me.
post #58 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Korimomto2 View Post
I've never heard of such a think!! I had a hospital birth and a birth center birth and neither happened. I *did* have to take a wheelchair to the door in the hospital, but that is SOP with all hospitals with all patients afaik. They insisted that *I* carry my baby though (not like I was arguing, )
That's not policy at the hospitals here either.
post #59 of 115
Dd # 1 was born in a hospital but nurses were so busy with other births they ignored us walking to car, carrying our own baby. I have no idea if that was allowed or not.
post #60 of 115
I think its important to reiterate that everyone is saying it is often hosptial POLICY to use a wheelchair or to have a nurse carry baby in a carseat, but not being an employee of the hospital, you are not obligated to follow hospital policy, especially if you are on your way out the door. If it bothers you then don't agree to it.
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