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Fess up, do you have a thing about sippy cups and older toddlers/preschoolers? - Page 15

Poll Results: Sippy cups for two year olds

 
  • 8% (42)
    despise them!
  • 17% (89)
    Don't hate them, but why not a cup?
  • 40% (207)
    Get a life, who cares?
  • 20% (105)
    I use them
  • 13% (68)
    I love them, as much as I love my Starbucks adult sippy
511 Total Votes  
post #281 of 332
DS1, who just turned 5, hadn't had a sippy cup in ages until his baby brother started using them. Then he asked for one, too. I let him pick out a couple at the store to be just for him.

Honest to deity, it never crossed my mind that somebody might be judging my family for *that.* I, personally, will do a little happy dance when I can get rid of the things for good, but only because we don't have a dishwasher and the valves are hard to get really clean.
post #282 of 332
When did your kid eating in the grocery store become wrong? Heaven's to Pete, I'm am messing up all over the place here.
post #283 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by katheek77 View Post
You do realize how off that statement you made is, I hope. I EP for my daughter, and she will ONLY take EBM in a bottle, not a sippy cup, not a regular cup, not my breast. So...I hope I'm LUCKY enough that she'll still be "carrying around a bottle" when she's a "big toddler like 2 or 3".

My inability to feed my daughter the "natural" way does not lessen her need for breastmilk (in whatever container I can get it to her), nor does it lessen her need to comfort suck on occassion. Unless there's an arbitrary cutoff age for nursing, there's no arbitrary cutoff age for bottles (or binkies, for that matter).

I am pretty confident she'll go off to college without her bottle and binkie.

Unfortunately, the way the milk comes out of the breast differs from the way it comes out of the bottle. From the bottle, it comes out far more quickly, easily and in a far great volumes, leading the child to consume sometimes huge amounts of milk. It is no wonder that there is a significant link between prolonged bottle feeding (of cow's milk, that is, not breastmilk) and anemia. Three and four year olds who are still drinking cow's milk from a bottle often do not eat enough other real food and suffer from a serious deficiency in iron as a result.
post #284 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
Unfortunately, the way the milk comes out of the breast differs from the way it comes out of the bottle. From the bottle, it comes out far more quickly, easily and in a far great volumes, leading the child to consume sometimes huge amounts of milk. It is no wonder that there is a significant link between prolonged bottle feeding (of cow's milk, that is, not breastmilk) and anemia. Three and four year olds who are still drinking cow's milk from a bottle often do not eat enough other real food and suffer from a serious deficiency in iron as a result.
But that's a *nutrition* problem, not a bottle problem. If I'm giving my daughter copious quantities of cow's milk, juice, pop, etc., it's not going to matter too much whether it's in a bottle or a regular cup. Yes, a child may drink a lot of cow's milk (or whatever) if it's in a bottle. From what I've seen, many times, if a child is offered CM (juice, pop, etc.) in a cup, s/he will also drink a lot of it as well, in lieu of water or breastmilk (if they're still being offered it). A beverage comes out of a cup just as quickly as it does out of a bottle, and even more so as the child gets older. I don't want to put words in your mouth, but it seems the concern you have (and I agree, if this is what you're arguing) is WHAT young children are being offered as opposed to HOW it's being offered.

I can't see denying my daughter breastmilk (the most complete food there is for her) just because she won't drink it out of a cup or from the breast . :
post #285 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
Unfortunately, the way the milk comes out of the breast differs from the way it comes out of the bottle. From the bottle, it comes out far more quickly, easily and in a far great volumes, leading the child to consume sometimes huge amounts of milk.
Just how big of a bottle are we talking about here?

I'm operating under the assumption that it's the parents' job to monitor how much and how often milk (or any other beverage) is offered in a bottle. The only way a child is going to injest huge amounts of milk is if it's given to him -- I don't see too many toddlers topping off their bottles at the fridge.

Let's place blame where it's due instead of denigrating the bottle.
post #286 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
Three and four year olds who are still drinking cow's milk from a bottle often do not eat enough other real food and suffer from a serious deficiency in iron as a result.
That's interesting. Do you have a link?
post #287 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by katheek77 View Post
A beverage comes out of a cup just as quickly as it does out of a bottle, and even more so as the child gets older. I don't want to put words in your mouth, but it seems the concern you have (and I agree, if this is what you're arguing) is WHAT young children are being offered as opposed to HOW it's being offered.
In fact the opposite is true. Children end up drinking far more from a bottle than they ever would from a cup of the same amount precisely because it is comfort combined with (in the case of cow's milk) a high calorie food. A 2 year old can suck back a whole bottle of milk in no time whereas it is unlikely that the same child would gulp back a cup of milk within the same time. That is the problem with extended bottle feeding and that is why it is not just a nutritional issue, it is also the way in which the milk is given. Cow's milk should be offered in a cup.

By the way, I am in no way suggesting that you should stop giving your child breastmilk (be it in a bottle or a cup). I commend you for continuing to give it to your child. I am just saying that for the vast majority of toddlers who are drinking cow's milk as opposed to breast milk from a bottle, the issue is not so simple as saying "he needs to suck, some toddlers suckle breasts so why can't he suckle cow's milk from a bottle...". It is just not the same thing. Not the same calorie content, not the same nutritional content, not the same volume of food.
post #288 of 332
post #289 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinaKat View Post
Just how big of a bottle are we talking about here?

I'm operating under the assumption that it's the parents' job to monitor how much and how often milk (or any other beverage) is offered in a bottle. The only way a child is going to injest huge amounts of milk is if it's given to him -- I don't see too many toddlers topping off their bottles at the fridge.

Let's place blame where it's due instead of denigrating the bottle.
Lot's of toddlers tote a bottle around all day. But even having two big bottles of cow's milk (=500 ml or 2 large cups) per day is too much dairy if the child is also consuming cheese and yogurt. Too much dairy fills up the stomach and causes the child to resist eating other foods that he needs. It also prevents the absorption of iron.
post #290 of 332
we still use them...i buy insulated ones and my dd occasionally drinks her water from there when we are on the go - she loves it because it keeps her water cold. she alternates between a sippy cup, a regular cup and a cup with a lid and straw. she is neither picky nor attached to any one type of cup.

i will add that she has been able to drink out of a regular cup for...oh...i don't know, at least 2 years (she is three) but when i am in the car, i don't feel the brightest way to give her water is in an open container.
post #291 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
A 2 year old can suck back a whole bottle of milk in no time whereas it is unlikely that the same child would gulp back a cup of milk within the same time.
maybe my 2yr old is an alien or jsut really weird or slow at eating, but when he was sick, i had to pump, and i had some milk in the fridge that needed using once he was better. So I fed it to him in the bottle, and surprisingly he took it, but it took him 15mins to eat 5oz of breastmilk.
post #292 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderwahine View Post
maybe my 2yr old is an alien or jsut really weird or slow at eating, but when he was sick, i had to pump, and i had some milk in the fridge that needed using once he was better. So I fed it to him in the bottle, and surprisingly he took it, but it took him 15mins to eat 5oz of breastmilk.
I don't think a sick and normally breastfed toddler is a good example. Have you ever watched a toddler who is used to going to bed with a bottle every night or having a bottle of milk for breakfast every day suck one back. Trust me, they don't drink milk from a cup that fast. And they get filled up good. My sister-in-law was saying that her daughter hardly eats any breakfast and couldn't figure out why. Um...maybe cause your daughter has eight ounces of milk in a period of 5 minutes before you even offer her some toast?
post #293 of 332
I've managed to ignore this thread for awhile, but I guess I'll answer it now.

Both my 4 yo and my 21 month old can drink from a regular cup. I'm also still nursing both of them if that matters somehow. HOWEVER, they both still drink from sippy cups. Why? Well my 21 month old loves her water. And my 4 yo has some issues with her motor skills (we're still in the process of IE evals right now) so she is very clumsy and falls often. Giving her a regular cup means that she will spill it everywhere at least 5 times during every single meal. 1. I'd like to eat to. and 2. Drinks are expensive! A cup of milk times 5 for every time she knocks it over? No thank you.

Yes, my children use sippy cups and I feel so shame about that.
post #294 of 332
clmp: Both my dd's have taken bottles of cows milk and neither one of them have ever had problems with iron. Both of them are Very Healthy. And they drank way more than 2 big bottles of milk per day.
I read the articles you posted too and neither of my dd's are obese either. I think the articles are talking about cows milk you buy at the store not raw cows milk straight from the tap
post #295 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
I don't think a sick and normally breastfed toddler is a good example. Have you ever watched a toddler who is used to going to bed with a bottle every night or having a bottle of milk for breakfast every day suck one back. Trust me, they don't drink milk from a cup that fast. And they get filled up good. My sister-in-law was saying that her daughter hardly eats any breakfast and couldn't figure out why. Um...maybe cause your daughter has eight ounces of milk in a period of 5 minutes before you even offer her some toast?
he wasnt sick when i fed it to him.....and as for a cup, my son cant even drink from a cup yet.
post #296 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by joy2bmom View Post
clmp: Both my dd's have taken bottles of cows milk and neither one of them have ever had problems with iron. Both of them are Very Healthy. And they drank way more than 2 big bottles of milk per day.
I read the articles you posted too and neither of my dd's are obese either. I think the articles are talking about cows milk you buy at the store not raw cows milk straight from the tap
No doubt the articles are referring to pasteurized cows milk purchased at a store. In any event, the studies are not suggesting that EVERY toddler who drinks milk from the bottle will be iron deficient, only that there is a signficant correlation between the two, which makes sense, as there are a lot of toddlers out there who simply prefer sucking back their milk to eating real food. Many mothers even acknowledge the problem but don't know how to get their kids off the bottle because it also happens to be a comfort object.
post #297 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
Many mothers even acknowledge the problem but don't know how to get their kids off the bottle because it also happens to be a comfort object.
But couldn't they just give their kids water in the bottle? We gave both water and milk.
post #298 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by marybethorama View Post
But couldn't they just give their kids water in the bottle? We gave both water and milk.
This is one solution, yes. But there are kids who recognize the difference and they want to suck warm milk, not water.
post #299 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
This is one solution, yes. But there are kids who recognize the difference and they want to suck warm milk, not water.
gradually shifting to water is one way to wean from the bottle.

My bottlefed child got cold milk I didn't warm his formula either.
post #300 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by veggiemomma View Post
WOW! That's pretty mean. I give my 2.5 and 3.5 yos sippy cups because I CAN NOT keep them from spilling their drinks unless I hold the cup while they drink out of a straw. They don't go for that. So, I guess I am an inattentive parent because my kids spill their drinks when I am sitting right beside them? I never knew. :

I do think it is ridiculous for an 8 yo to drink out of a sippy cup.
I think what dentmom was saying is that sippy cups = tooth decay. On my end of things I see this all the time. Little sips here and there continually bathe the teeth in sugar (unless you are doing water only). Kid don't sip with regular cups. The usually drink with a meal and don't carry the cup around. Have you tried filling cups 1/8th full and refilling when necessary. You could also ask them to help you clean up the spill.
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