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Selective vaxers -- how do you feel about Hep A?

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
For those of you who are being selective about your kiddos' vaccinations, what are your feelings on the Hep A shot? My ped. was pushing me to get Hep A for my daughter, even though he's been pretty cool about our choice to delay vaccinations until the age of 2. How do you all feel about this particular shot? Do you feel the good outweighs the risk?

And while we're at it, what do you think about Hep B? We have another one due in January, and I'm leaning toward no, but would it be beneficial to perhaps get it at a later date?
post #2 of 36
I think Hep A is one of the easiest to cross off the list of potential vaccines to get. The disease is usually totally without any symptoms at all in little kids, but they give it to toddlers to protect adults, since toddlers are considered the "spreaders". HepA isn't even THAT bad in adults, though (one third of "us" have had it already and never even knew what it was...it's basically the "stomach flu" you catch from food.)
Chickenpox is significantly more deadly than HepA.

HepB is another one, although I do think it's worth considering later (like, the teen years).
post #3 of 36
First it's a fairly new vaccine.

Second- it is- as a rule, so mild in children that often you don't even know they've had it.

-Angela
post #4 of 36
Thread Starter 
That's what I was thinking about Hep A. I hadn't had the chance to research it very well, but I asked the ped what would happen if she were to contract the disease, and none of his arguments were very convincing. The worst thing that I saw happening was that if she gets a particularly nasty case, it could affect her growth. That is a bit of a worry, because she already went 4 months without growing for no apparent reason, so I'd prefer that her growth not be stunted. But he was telling me that even that's rare, and it doesn't appear to be fatal -- I was just confused why he was so adamant about it if it's not going to cause death or permanent damage.
post #5 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenbean View Post
But he was telling me that even that's rare, and it doesn't appear to be fatal -- I was just confused why he was so adamant about it if it's not going to cause death or permanent damage.
If death and permanent damage are your worries- look closely at the other vaccines. What I found was that the diseases that we actually have a fair chance of coming into contact with in the US do NOT cause death or permanent damage.

-Angela
post #6 of 36
Thread Starter 
Well, to be honest, I don't see the point of vaccinating against a disease that will only make the kid sick -- death and permanent damage are the only viable reasons I see for them. Like chickenpox -- if your kid has a healthy immune system, it's not going to be fatal, so why vaccinate for it? So yeah, that's my main concern. It's why we decided to delay (although she did get them for the first 6 months) until she's at least 2, and then only get the ones that protect against the true nasties.
post #7 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenbean View Post
Well, to be honest, I don't see the point of vaccinating against a disease that will only make the kid sick -- death and permanent damage are the only viable reasons I see for them. Like chickenpox -- if your kid has a healthy immune system, it's not going to be fatal, so why vaccinate for it? So yeah, that's my main concern. It's why we decided to delay (although she did get them for the first 6 months) until she's at least 2, and then only get the ones that protect against the true nasties.
Keep researching none on the current schedule that your child has a significant chance of coming into contact with will do anything more than make them sick for a bit.

-Angela
post #8 of 36
Here's the thing about worst cases - there is always a worst case scenario for both sides. I realized this when in a discussion about the flu vaccine recently. One mom said that the worst case scenario was that her DD would die of the flu. Another mom pointed out that, on the other side, the worst case scenario was that DD would die of a vaccine reaction.
I just found that interesting, as I had never had it put so bluntly into words before.

As for Hep A, it's like the flu in many ways, but tends to be mild. The vax also contains "human diploid cells" aka material from aborted fetal tissue. So, that's why we won't do it.
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by rredhead View Post
As for Hep A, it's like the flu in many ways, but tends to be mild.
Actually it's an intestinal bug, not a respiratory bug like the flu. Worst case it would look like bad food poisoning.

-Angela
post #10 of 36
We're not doing it and our ped isn't pushing it and didn't give it to his 18mo.
post #11 of 36
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your input ladies. I've read about it a bit, and I think we're going to forego it. I appreciate all your input.
post #12 of 36
If you live on the west coast or in the southwest and your kids will be in daycare, and especially if you're not breastfeeding, I would consider having your children get it. Apparently Hep A is much more prevalent in those areas and it spreads easily through daycare centers. Dr. Sears new book, The Vaccine Book, gives some good info.

As for Hep B, I don't see any reason to give a newborn or child that vaccine unless the mother has Hep B. We'll reconsider it when our kids are teenagers, but I'm hoping we've instilled good values and they won't be IV drug users or promiscuous...we'll see.
post #13 of 36
Its not on our list...the only ones we are currently considering are DTaP (or DT if we wait long enough) and possibly MMR when DS is pre-teen
post #14 of 36
I'm still researching all the info and I'm not sure yet what I will let DS have (if any) and when but Hep A we won't be getting. Hep A is a mild condition that in 90% of cases is asymptomatic and you never know you had it. It is easily treated and once its gone you have a lifetime immunity. So I see no reason to get it. HepB is another we won't be vaxing with (although DS did get a shot of HepB in the hosp). We won't be anymore b/c HepB is an STD. I don't see my 5 yo having sex with numerous people and sharing drug needles. I'll let my kids make the decision to get this on their own as adults or vax them as teens if they need it.
post #15 of 36
I had hep A at 18 and I did not consider it mild or anything like the flu. I had jaundice with it and was very, very sick. It led to mono as I was so run down. I was a mess for weeks. Also, now I cannot donate blood or an organ because of it. Not sure why, but that is a fact. I could not donate to even my own family.

That being said I do not think babies or toddlers need this one . I would wait until preschool age or older to do that one. As for hep B, there is evidence that preschoolers can pass it via biting so I would wait on that one and not do it at birth. We did not do it at birth but started after age one.
post #16 of 36
Quote:
As for hep B, there is evidence that preschoolers can pass it via biting so I would wait on that one and not do it at birth.
Where did you find that information? Everything I've read about Hep B insists that it's an STD, or blood borne. This is via the NIH:
The virus that causes hepatitis B is spread through contact with infected blood or other body fluids of people who have hepatitis B. For example, you can get hepatitis B by having unprotected sex with an infected person.

People who use intravenous drugs can get hepatitis B when they share needles with someone who has the virus. Health care workers, such as nurses, lab technicians and doctors, can get these infections if they are accidentally stuck with a needle that was used on an infected patient.

Pregnant women who are infected with hepatitis B can also pass the virus on to their babies.

Hepatitis B cannot be transmitted through casual contact. For example, you cannot get hepatitis B by hugging or shaking hands with someone who is infected.


Furthermore, the immunity from the Hep B vax only lasts 10-20 years. This is a PRO-vaccine article, and even it admits that.
http://cw11.empowereddoctor.com/story_435.html

In the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You... by Dr. Stephanie Cave, she cites that in 1996, there were fewer than 75 cases of Hep B in children under the age of 5. There were about 20,000 reports of moderate to severe adverse effects in VAERS. I don't like those odds, personally.
post #17 of 36
Quote:
transmission has occurred through a human bite
http://www.cdc.gov/MMWR/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5516a1.htm

Quote:
The virus is transmitted through blood and infected bodily fluids.
Quote:
Hepatitis B In the World

* 2 billion people have been infected (1 out of 3 people).
* 400 million people are chronically infected.
* 10-30 million will become infected each year.
* An estimated 1 million people die each year from hepatitis B and its complications.
* Approximately 2 people die each minute from hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B In the United States

* 12 million Americans have been infected (1 out of 20 people).
* More than one million people are chronically infected .
* Up to 100,000 new people will become infected each year.
* 5,000 people will die each year from hepatitis B and its complications.
* Approximately 1 health care worker dies each day from hepatitis B.

http://www.hepb.org/
post #18 of 36
My understanding is that the bite theory is just a theory. I don't know of any confirmed cases transmitted that way.

-Angela
post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
My understanding is that the bite theory is just a theory. I don't know of any confirmed cases transmitted that way.

-Angela
I had blood borne pathogens training to get my teaching cert and we were cautioned about transmission of diseases via biting. Even if it is a theory, it is not worth chancing with Hep B on the rise as much as it is. It is becoming an international plague.
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowpansy View Post
I had blood borne pathogens training to get my teaching cert and we were cautioned about transmission of diseases via biting. Even if it is a theory, it is not worth chancing with Hep B on the rise as much as it is. It is becoming an international plague.
It's also a risky vaccine. I'm not convinced there is any realistic way for a preschooler to contract it. It seems most logical to wait for this one until the pre-teen years at least.

-Angela
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