or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Family Safety › Winter clothing and car seats
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Winter clothing and car seats - Page 2

post #21 of 28
I second the recommendation for the 3-1/4-1 jackets with the fleece inner jackets and extra layer! One other thing I've found that's great to put over a kiddo in the car is a fleece poncho. With the fleece jacket on, I buckle them into the seat, then I slip the poncho over their heads if it's crazy cold and it drapes over them like a blanket.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcheeks View Post
I'm in Manitoba. In winter here, it's not uncommon for us to get -40*C/F cold snaps that easily last a week or two -- and that's not factoring in the wind chill, which can easily reach -50*C/-58*F or colder. And after a few days of temps like that and being stuck indoors, one and their kids tends to get a stir crazy and *has* to get out. I'm sure you know how it is.

I feel like I need to put this kind of cold into perspective b/c in similar threads I've noticed a lot of the people who reply are in climates that experience WAY milder winter temps -- ie, your "cold" is what we go out in sweaters/fleeces and *maybe* a toque and mitts, if the wind's up. Even after letting the car warm up for 20+ minutes (we do not have a garage so our car is parked outside in these temps and I won't even start on how expensive and wasteful letting the car idle for that long is), at such extreme cold temps, the car interior is not warm at all and the car seats are, obviously, nowhere near warm. Also, in that kind of cold, it takes less than one minute for frostbite to set in. So we really are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Do we bundle up our kids to lessen the frostbite risk and exposure to extreme cold and therefore increase the risk of ejection in a crash? Or do we under dress the kids, put them in very cold car seats to lessen the chance of ejection in a crash but at the same time, they're more exposed and vulnerable to the extreme cold, which can have serious consequences also.

So, for trips around town (where it usually takes 5 minutes or less to get to our destination), I have to choose the lesser of 2 evils. I keep the kids bundled up. : I can't risk exposing them to that cold. I get their straps as tight as I can (they have down filled coats so they do compress quite a bit) and, most importantly, I drive defensively to lessen my chances of being in a crash. I keep a fair distance between myself and the car in front of me. I drive for the conditions . . . if that means doing 25km/hr in a 50, so be it. I am aware of vehicles near me and I approach all intersections w/caution, even light controlled ones. I realize I'm taking a risk by having my kids still in their jackets and snowpants so I try to minimize that risk by driving defensively. But I still can't help but feel like a terrible mother for doing so b/c I know I'm going to hear it about how I'm totally endangering them by keeping them bundled up. Either way, I'm endangering them. It's a lose/lose situation for us.

For out of town trips and trips around town when it's not as cold (say -20*C/-4*F ), we put them in fleece-lined jackets, their toques and mitts and cover them w/their fleece tie blankets.
we're in MB too, and we feel the same way. These kids are *little* and not as capable of maintaining their body temp as adults are. Strapping them into a frozen carseat is dangerous, and a 100% risk of exposure, while having them tightly strapped in with their less bulky but warm jacket is way less of a risk than the exposure that would certainly happen if they were jsut wearing a carseat poncho or something. those ponchos are simply not enough for here...
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcheeks View Post
I'm in Manitoba. In winter here, it's not uncommon for us to get -40*C/F cold snaps that easily last a week or two -- and that's not factoring in the wind chill, which can easily reach -50*C/-58*F or colder. And after a few days of temps like that and being stuck indoors, one and their kids tends to get a stir crazy and *has* to get out. I'm sure you know how it is.

I feel like I need to put this kind of cold into perspective b/c in similar threads I've noticed a lot of the people who reply are in climates that experience WAY milder winter temps -- ie, your "cold" is what we go out in sweaters/fleeces and *maybe* a toque and mitts, if the wind's up. Even after letting the car warm up for 20+ minutes (we do not have a garage so our car is parked outside in these temps and I won't even start on how expensive and wasteful letting the car idle for that long is), at such extreme cold temps, the car interior is not warm at all and the car seats are, obviously, nowhere near warm. Also, in that kind of cold, it takes less than one minute for frostbite to set in. So we really are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Do we bundle up our kids to lessen the frostbite risk and exposure to extreme cold and therefore increase the risk of ejection in a crash? Or do we under dress the kids, put them in very cold car seats to lessen the chance of ejection in a crash but at the same time, they're more exposed and vulnerable to the extreme cold, which can have serious consequences also.

So, for trips around town (where it usually takes 5 minutes or less to get to our destination), I have to choose the lesser of 2 evils. I keep the kids bundled up. : I can't risk exposing them to that cold. I get their straps as tight as I can (they have down filled coats so they do compress quite a bit) and, most importantly, I drive defensively to lessen my chances of being in a crash. I keep a fair distance between myself and the car in front of me. I drive for the conditions . . . if that means doing 25km/hr in a 50, so be it. I am aware of vehicles near me and I approach all intersections w/caution, even light controlled ones. I realize I'm taking a risk by having my kids still in their jackets and snowpants so I try to minimize that risk by driving defensively. But I still can't help but feel like a terrible mother for doing so b/c I know I'm going to hear it about how I'm totally endangering them by keeping them bundled up. Either way, I'm endangering them. It's a lose/lose situation for us.

For out of town trips and trips around town when it's not as cold (say -20*C/-4*F ), we put them in fleece-lined jackets, their toques and mitts and cover them w/their fleece tie blankets.
Another MB'er here chiming in. Sweetcheeks has explained our dilemma extremely well. I just wanted to add one more point. We travel on the highways a fair bit. If we were to get in an accident I feel that my children would be at a much higher risk of being injured by exposure to the elements while waiting for help than an injury caused by wearing their coats in their car seats. When frostbite starts in under a minute, there's not much time to wait (strapped in the seat of course b/c you wouldn't move them until you know they are uninjured).

So yes, when the weather is amenable, we do wear the appropriate clothing and take it off to ride in seats. But when we are at our extremes in the winter (which is not just one or two days a year here - last year it was almost 6-8 weeks worth), we wear coats in the car.
post #24 of 28
So far no one has mentioned those fleece "baby sacks" with the openings for car seat straps. Are they terribly unsafe, or do many people not use them? I have one for dd. It has arms but is just a bag on the bottom, with a place for the bottom restraint to go through. It is not bulky like a puffy coat but warmer than a fleece jacket and pants, imo.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by hibana View Post
So far no one has mentioned those fleece "baby sacks" with the openings for car seat straps. Are they terribly unsafe, or do many people not use them? I have one for dd. It has arms but is just a bag on the bottom, with a place for the bottom restraint to go through. It is not bulky like a puffy coat but warmer than a fleece jacket and pants, imo.
I've heard that these are not safe, as they are adding an extra layer between the seat and baby. But there is a version that goes around the top of the seat with elastic that is safe.
post #26 of 28

There are some issues with

the baby sacks. One is that the fluffier ones, like the "lambskin" type Dundle Me's, are too bulky in between the baby's back and the shell of the seat. The other is that they can block your ability to see if the harness straps are in the correct slot for your baby's height. In an infant seat, straps should be at or just below shoulder height. It is really not a good idea to have the straps in slots that are TOO low. For a baby seat, the shower cap style is best.

In a convertible seat, I agree with Chickety -- a poncho is great!
post #27 of 28

sleeping bag solution

Where I grew up in New England we had several weeks of below zero weather, roads that were rarely driven on and no heater in some of the cars my parents drove. A similar equation. My mother's solution was to get sleeping bags for us kids (the hooded kind, mummy are they still called?), cut and seam a hole in the back of the hood so our faces would poke through (and condensation wouldn't build up from breathing into them). When we were buckled in, we would put our legs into the half zippered sleeping bags and pull the hood up over our face. There may have been a snap behind our heads that helped the hood stay up. There was no sleeping bag between us and the car seat, just on top of us and around our legs. I remember being able to hold a book under the sleeping bag at chest level and still read it.




Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcheeks View Post
I'm in Manitoba. In winter here, it's not uncommon for us to get -40*C/F cold snaps that easily last a week or two -- and that's not factoring in the wind chill, which can easily reach -50*C/-58*F or colder. And after a few days of temps like that and being stuck indoors, one and their kids tends to get a stir crazy and *has* to get out. I'm sure you know how it is.

I feel like I need to put this kind of cold into perspective b/c in similar threads I've noticed a lot of the people who reply are in climates that experience WAY milder winter temps -- ie, your "cold" is what we go out in sweaters/fleeces and *maybe* a toque and mitts, if the wind's up. Even after letting the car warm up for 20+ minutes (we do not have a garage so our car is parked outside in these temps and I won't even start on how expensive and wasteful letting the car idle for that long is), at such extreme cold temps, the car interior is not warm at all and the car seats are, obviously, nowhere near warm. Also, in that kind of cold, it takes less than one minute for frostbite to set in. So we really are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Do we bundle up our kids to lessen the frostbite risk and exposure to extreme cold and therefore increase the risk of ejection in a crash? Or do we under dress the kids, put them in very cold car seats to lessen the chance of ejection in a crash but at the same time, they're more exposed and vulnerable to the extreme cold, which can have serious consequences also.

So, for trips around town (where it usually takes 5 minutes or less to get to our destination), I have to choose the lesser of 2 evils. I keep the kids bundled up. : I can't risk exposing them to that cold. I get their straps as tight as I can (they have down filled coats so they do compress quite a bit) and, most importantly, I drive defensively to lessen my chances of being in a crash. I keep a fair distance between myself and the car in front of me. I drive for the conditions . . . if that means doing 25km/hr in a 50, so be it. I am aware of vehicles near me and I approach all intersections w/caution, even light controlled ones. I realize I'm taking a risk by having my kids still in their jackets and snowpants so I try to minimize that risk by driving defensively. But I still can't help but feel like a terrible mother for doing so b/c I know I'm going to hear it about how I'm totally endangering them by keeping them bundled up. Either way, I'm endangering them. It's a lose/lose situation for us.

For out of town trips and trips around town when it's not as cold (say -20*C/-4*F ), we put them in fleece-lined jackets, their toques and mitts and cover them w/their fleece tie blankets.
post #28 of 28
Does anyone remember the space bag commercials from a few years ago? In a crash, your child's coat will act like a comforter in a space bag. It will compress down to nothing. The laws of physics don't change because it's cold. Your child needs to be warm, but being warm will not matter when they are ejected from your vehicle in a crash.

It is VITAL that you find another solution than leaving your children in their seats with their coats.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Family Safety
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Family Safety › Winter clothing and car seats