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The Cookbook that Changed Your Life! - Page 2

post #21 of 44
I'm so curious, which of the Moosewood books do you most recommend?

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b/...rds=Moosewood+

Thanks, Amanda
post #22 of 44
Oh! Forgot another great one - Full Moon Feast by Jessica Prentice. It's half recipes/half book (kind of like nourishing traditions). Some GREAT recipes, and a really thoughtful, fascinating, discussion-provoking read, like the Omnivore's Dilemma. I hiiiiighly recommend it.
post #23 of 44
Another vote for Nourishing Traditions. Not the recipes, but all of the food info. Also Wild Fermentation and Full Moon Feast.

Outside the traditional foods realm, Zuni Cafe Cookbook for sure. Just reading the first 90 pages or so really changed how I look at cooking. The text accompanying the recipes is incredibly informative.
post #24 of 44
The book I go to again and again is the original Moosewood Cookbook. I'm also a big fan of The Essential Vegetarian Cookbook.

My partner, however, would have very different answers. He'd say you can't live without The French Laundry Cookbook and The Silver Spoon.
post #25 of 44
More with Less - It probably contradicts NT in many ways, but what can I say, it got me away from pre-fab food.
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by avengingophelia View Post
He'd say you can't live without The French Laundry Cookbook and The Silver Spoon.
Ohh, I'll second The Silver Spoon. Absolutely fantastic book.
post #27 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benji'sMom View Post
More with Less - It probably contradicts NT in many ways, but what can I say, it got me away from pre-fab food.
This would probably have to be one of mine as well. Not only does it get me making more from scratch, but it really made me start to think about what I eat in relation to what the rest of the world eats, and issues of abundance and responsibility.

More recently, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle has really gotten me thinking more about local foods, and looking at the amount of processing and food miles that go into what I eat. I'm starting to think much more seasonally about my food.
post #28 of 44
Any of the Mollie Katzen or Moosewood books. They sort of changed the way I cooked and prepares meals. I bought my first one when I was like 19 and on my own. I also have to say that the Martha Stewart books-many of them-are truly inspirational cooking-wise for me. There's also a great veg book called Quick Vegetarian Pleasures (Jean Lemlin?) that is wonderful that I turn to again and again. There are others, but these jump out first.
post #29 of 44
I just checked out of the library Simply in Season. And I love it and have made at least 4 different things from it in the past few days.

It's in the same tradition (Mennonite/living simply) as More with Less that a previous poster mentioned

It's about eating seasonal foods and some things are veggie (or easily converted). I made yougurt for the first time and it turned out great.
post #30 of 44
subbing
post #31 of 44
i gotta say, the joy of cooking is a pretty awesome book. ive barely ever used the recipes, but the text on baking has been really helpful.
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyApple View Post
I'm so curious, which of the Moosewood books do you most recommend?

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b/...rds=Moosewood+

Thanks, Amanda
The original Moosewood is great, but I use The Moosewood Cooks at Home all the time. I am usually looking for fast though!
post #33 of 44
I'd second a lot esp Silver Spoon and Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything. But the one that really got me started was Madeline Kamman's The New Making of a Cook. I transitioned from recipes to techniques. Opened all sorts of doors for my ability to cook.
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by potatofairy View Post
i gotta say, the joy of cooking is a pretty awesome book. ive barely ever used the recipes, but the text on baking has been really helpful.
Same here, I finally got my own copy and just by reading I've learned so much about the basic "why-to's" behind the cooking process. Like lisalou said, techniques instead of recipes.
post #35 of 44
ok don't laugh.
http://www.amazon.com/Made-Love-Stor...3688004&sr=8-1

I found this one a year after I went vegetarian and GD broke up. I had never heard of sprouting,veggie or organic food other than at Dead shows. I love this cookbook still! (And I have the one that this one above is a sequal too- I think it's called Cooking with the Dead) ahhh what a trip down memory lane!
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbowmoon View Post
ok don't laugh.
http://www.amazon.com/Made-Love-Stor...3688004&sr=8-1

I found this one a year after I went vegetarian and GD broke up. I had never heard of sprouting,veggie or organic food other than at Dead shows. I love this cookbook still! (And I have the one that this one above is a sequal too- I think it's called Cooking with the Dead) ahhh what a trip down memory lane!
I love that book! The woman who wrote Cooking with the Dead later wrote another a book with singer Dar Williams about finding vegetarian/vegan food throughout the country.

Another shout out for the Moosewood here. I bought it about ten years ago when dh and I were first married and I was giving vegetarianism a go. It blew my mind and I think in two years I cooked every single recipe in the the whole book. I also love The Enchanted Broccoli Forest by Katzen too. As far as baking, the King Arthur Flour's Bakers Companion changed the way I bake EVERYTHING. It is an amazing, wonderful, incredible resource for anyone that bakes anything.
post #37 of 44
I have to second the New Best Recipe, although any from that series are great. I am so into the Best International Recipe that just came out. They are pretty whole food (though not whole grain) focused and I love to read them. I also love any of Deborah Madison's cookbooks. And Omnivore's Dilemna and Animal, Vegetable, Miracle change my life. (And AVM has great recipes!)
Those of you who said the Silver Spoon, what's so good about that one? I've looked at it before and wondered if it was worth buying.
post #38 of 44
I love the Moosewood cookbooks, too. My favorites are Moosewood Low Fat and Moosewood Simple Suppers. I also like Moosewood Cooks at Home. Um, I like them all.

My other favorite cookbook is the Southern Living Ultimate Cookbook. It's my go-to when I want to make eclairs or chocolate pie or a good roasted chicken or something very basic, but good. There are some cream of soup recipes in there, but less than you'd think, and you can always just make a white sauce.
post #39 of 44
Silver Spoon - I love Italian food and it's basically, allegedly the Joy of Cooking for Italy. It's given as a wedding gift. Everything I've made from it so far has been great. But if you are someone like my dp who wants me to scientifically explain what slightly thickened means, this is not the cookbook for you. The recipes aren't precise. And if you are like dp then you should focus on baking. That sort of eye for precise detail is why I"m not a good baker but a pretty good cook.
post #40 of 44
I like Vegan with a Vengance. Unlike every other vegan cookbook ever, there is no preachy crap and guilt tripping about why everyone needs to be vegan and how to eliminate all animal products from your life, just funny anecdotes and great recipes.
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