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Income Poll - Page 9

Poll Results: What is your annual household income?

 
  • 5% (30)
    Less than $20,000
  • 8% (44)
    $20,000 to $29,000
  • 12% (64)
    $30,000 to $39,000
  • 10% (53)
    $40,000 to $49,000
  • 12% (62)
    $50,000 to $59,000
  • 12% (61)
    $60,000 to $69,000
  • 7% (37)
    $70,000 to $79,000
  • 5% (28)
    $80,000 to $89,000
  • 4% (24)
    $90,000 to $99,000
  • 20% (101)
    $100,000 or more
504 Total Votes  
post #161 of 200
Wow, I had a feeling that the MDC mamas were doing better by far than my family, but now I know it's true. So many over 100K, I am so jealous!

I had heard that being a SAHM has started to something mostly only women with husbands who earn a great deal do, but seeing it in print makes me realize that it's really coming true.

I see it when I go to playgroups at mamas' houses, and they live in $500K homes. We have a 2 bedroom apartment. I think most women married to men who make significantly less have jobs.

It's rough being in the lower middle class when you know if you worked you wouldn't be. But then when a couple makes a total of $100K together, it's not worth as much as when just one partner makes that much, anyway.
post #162 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookietooth View Post
Wow, I had a feeling that the MDC mamas were doing better by far than my family, but now I know it's true. So many over 100K, I am so jealous!

I had heard that being a SAHM has started to something mostly only women with husbands who earn a great deal do, but seeing it in print makes me realize that it's really coming true.

I see it when I go to playgroups at mamas' houses, and they live in $500K homes. We have a 2 bedroom apartment. I think most women married to men who make significantly less have jobs.

It's rough being in the lower middle class when you know if you worked you wouldn't be. But then when a couple makes a total of $100K together, it's not worth as much as when just one partner makes that much, anyway.
I have to agree with being surprised by the results of this income poll. I was very surprised that most voted $100,000 or more. But you have to remember this is not a scientific poll, and it is voluntary, so the results are by no means a representative sample.

That said, I have to disagree that most MDC moms have husbands who make close to or over $100,000.

My perception from reading posts has been that many MDC families are middle to lower income and many rely on programs such as WIC and state funded health care programs. I guess it depends which posts you read...

In my real life, I know ZERO stay at home moms whose husbands earn over $100,000. I don't know any stay at home moms who have $500,000 houses. Not one.

I know roughly 20 SAHMs in real life and plenty of working moms. The SAHMs have husbands who make $40k, $50k, $60k mostly. They cut corners on their budget and they live frugally, or maybe they receive a lot of help from parents. I only know of 2 stay at home moms whose husbands make more than $80k.

I'd be curious to know what occupations have a single earner over $100k. My husband and I are both college educated, we both have or had "good" careers, and we waited to have children to become established in our careers (close to a decade of work experience before kids). We never earned $100,000 or more even with both of us working.

I am able to stay at home because I saved a lot of my salary and now we use that to supplement my DH's salary. It won't last forever and soon I'll go back to work.

Also, I don't think the grass is always greener. Sure, it would be nice in some ways to have a DH earning over $100,000, but to me that comes with some inherent problems if salaries between spouses are so imbalanced...

...such as what if DH is layed off? Then what happens to the family? What if DH is disabled or worse? With a corporate culture of downsizing and outsourcing, I am thankful my husband and I have fairly equal earning power. I feel safer. Companies often look to save money, and they have a penchant for cutting middle managers, ect with inflated salaries. That is very scary to me. I'd feel very vulnerable if DH earned significantly more than the average worker and significantly more than me (while of course also enjoying the good times while they lasted). ...particularly in this economy.

Just some thoughts...anyone else concur?
post #163 of 200
SpringFlower,

Just adding to your post regarding skewed sampling of SAHM's.

Any on here likely have internet at home.

So that means many SAHM's, especially the ones who cannot afford internet at home, did not vote.
post #164 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Purity♥Lake~ View Post
SpringFlower,

Just adding to your post regarding skewed sampling of SAHM's.

Any on here likely have internet at home.

So that means many SAHM's, especially the ones who cannot afford internet at home, did not vote.
Exactly!

:

Also, I think I read earlier in the thread that some two income households responded before they realized it was a poll for stay at home parents. Honestly, I wouldn't trust this poll because it is voluntary, and open only to MDC members who bother to respond, etc. Look at US Census data if you really want to know...and you'll see that most people do not make that high of an income.

The posts themselves are rather enlightening, however.
post #165 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Purity♥Lake~ View Post
SpringFlower,

Just adding to your post regarding skewed sampling of SAHM's.

Any on here likely have internet at home.

So that means many SAHM's, especially the ones who cannot afford internet at home, did not vote.
Another thought...I think salaries are so contingent on where you live. My husband and I together never made over $100,000 but I imagine if we both worked in the same fields BUT in a certain city (NYC or LA for example) I have a feeling we would earn over $100,000 but would be paying much, much more for living expenses due to the cost of living.

It's all so relative...
post #166 of 200
Right now we're in the 30-39k range. But hopefully with the job my husband recently interviewed for which looks like he's likely going to get (his DREAM JOB btw!) we'll be a little higher than that. He had another job opportunity where the job had potential to pay up to 200k or so a year, but I think it's worth it for him to choose the job of his dreams even if the potential income for the future (about 80k) is less than the other job (that would also keep him away from home A LOT). Plus this job could lead him to even BETTER jobs!
post #167 of 200
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spring Flower View Post
Another thought...I think salaries are so contingent on where you live. My husband and I together never made over $100,000 but I imagine if we both worked in the same fields BUT in a certain city (NYC or LA for example) I have a feeling we would earn over $100,000 but would be paying much, much more for living expenses due to the cost of living.

It's all so relative...
This is sooooo true. In your earlier post, you mentioned not knowing any SAHMs who had a house worth more than $500,000 -- where I live, our little 2-bedroom condo is worth more than $500,000, so virtually *everyone* I know who lives in even the smallest of detached homes has a house worth $600,000 or more. It's verrrrrry relative.
post #168 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
This is sooooo true. In your earlier post, you mentioned not knowing any SAHMs who had a house worth more than $500,000 -- where I live, our little 2-bedroom condo is worth more than $500,000, so virtually *everyone* I know who lives in even the smallest of detached homes has a house worth $600,000 or more. It's verrrrrry relative.
Well, you've got me there! Good point! Yes, I have to agree that in some areas of the country (LA, San Diego, etc) there are probably median house prices in the $500k to $600k range.

Where I live a $500k home would be a large mansion of a home. But, like you said it's relative...very, very relative.
post #169 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by LolaK View Post
So I have to ask, everyone who posted saying their household income is over $100K also pointed out that they are struggling in some way, or don't have new things, or aren't extravegant. What is wrong with making a good income? Why do you guys sound almost guilty about having money??
I agree. We are able to be where we are after 20+ years of hard work and hard knocks-for both of us-no guilt here whatsoever! Some of the jobs we've held and the things we've had to put up with were appalling.
post #170 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by LolaK View Post
So I have to ask, everyone who posted saying their household income is over $100K also pointed out that they are struggling in some way, or don't have new things, or aren't extravegant. What is wrong with making a good income? Why do you guys sound almost guilty about having money??
Not to be snarky or anything, but I honestly can't understand how making $100,000 per year could still result in financial struggle.

I've looked into moving to high cost areas and what salaries would be comparable in terms of spending power and $100,000 basically allows you to live comfortably nearly everywhere.

I know people who struggle because they make $10,000 or $20,000. That's really struggling.

We don't make anywhere near $100,000 and I would say we're comfortable and feel blessed.

But, I agree, you shouldn't feel guilty or like you have to apologize...
post #171 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
This is sooooo true. In your earlier post, you mentioned not knowing any SAHMs who had a house worth more than $500,000 -- where I live, our little 2-bedroom condo is worth more than $500,000, so virtually *everyone* I know who lives in even the smallest of detached homes has a house worth $600,000 or more. It's verrrrrry relative.
Agreed! I mean, we're living on approx. 36k a year. Yes, we rent an apartment and don't have a house but that's actually because of credit issues (long story with one of his old job trying to make him pay for things THEY were responsible for) and not because we can't afford it. Right now we're having some troubles, but only because DHs work found a way to get out of having to give him his commission check ($1,300) last month which is why he's looking for a new job. We eat well, go out to eat when we get the notion (we could afford to go out a lot, we just don't choose to). We basically can afford whatever we really want and need. Could we afford a brand new Mercedes Benz? Perhaps (with low payments), but probably not. But those are things we don't *want* anyways! We do well with what we have. But I know in LOTS of places if a family of 3 made $36k a year they'd be living in a really bad neighborhood and eating ramen noodles. And they'd be living in a tiny apartment, whereas ours is about 1200sq.ft (2 bedroom) which isn't that bad at all!
post #172 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by vermonttaylors View Post
We are solidly in the 100K category and I would describe us as affluent
<snip>
We also do try to spread it around as much as possible...
..and we help out friends as needed and try to treat people to little luxuries they might not otherwise be able to afford (dinner out, concert tickets, gift certificates etc.)
Wanna be my friend??
post #173 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by aricha View Post
Wanna be my friend??


Hey get in line! No cutting!

post #174 of 200
We make 56,000 a year between my p's salary and my disability insurance (which will last until I have the babe, our income will go down as I go onto govt mat leave and then nothing as I will continue to sahm.) We are very comfortable. Our house will be paid off in January which will help alot too. We do not have an extravagant lifestyle. P drives a $500 truck, I have a 4 year old car which is on payments. We have some personal debt, but not too much....around $20K, which will go down dramatically after house is paid off.
Its all relative though. We live in a rural community. If we lives somewhere live Vancouver, we would be scraping by and not be able to afford a house.
post #175 of 200
According to wikipedia, US household income broke down this way in 2006:

$0 to $25,000 -- 28.22%
$25,000 to $50,000 --- 26.65%
$50,000 to $75,000 -- 18.27%
$75,000 to $100,000 -- 10.93%
$100,000 to $150,000 -- 9.89%
$150,000 and up -- 5.84%

So, it's not surprising to see so many 100K+ incomes here. 15% of the population is a significant group.

For what it's worth, at various times in my adult life I've lived on under 20K/year and I've lived on 145K/year. And pretty much everywhere in between -- all, incidentally, in one of the "very high COL cities" mentioned in this thread.

Neither end of the spectrum made me any more or less happy!

I did different things when I had less money (like taking the bus... or walking if I didn't have bus fare) than I did when I had more (like shopping at Whole Foods without even looking at price tags, or travelling internationally). But even though the *details* of my life changed with my income, the *themes* of my life did not.

The important things in my life have been people and experiences, not things. I can have as much fun over a bowl of ramen and a glass of tap water as I can in a four star restaurant, if I'm with the people I love.
post #176 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinaKat View Post
According to wikipedia, US household income broke down this way in 2006:

$0 to $25,000 -- 28.22%
$25,000 to $50,000 --- 26.65%
$50,000 to $75,000 -- 18.27%
$75,000 to $100,000 -- 10.93%
$100,000 to $150,000 -- 9.89%
$150,000 and up -- 5.84%

So, it's not surprising to see so many 100K+ incomes here. 15% of the population is a significant group.

For what it's worth, at various times in my adult life I've lived on under 20K/year and I've lived on 145K/year. And pretty much everywhere in between -- all, incidentally, in one of the "very high COL cities" mentioned in this thread.

Neither end of the spectrum made me any more or less happy!

I did different things when I had less money (like taking the bus... or walking if I didn't have bus fare) than I did when I had more (like shopping at Whole Foods without even looking at price tags, or travelling internationally). But even though the *details* of my life changed with my income, the *themes* of my life did not.

The important things in my life have been people and experiences, not things. I can have as much fun over a bowl of ramen and a glass of tap water as I can in a four star restaurant, if I'm with the people I love.
Wonderful post. I completely agree and like how your phrased details and themes of life, in relation to money. That is a great way to explain it.

:

But, if 15% earn more than 100k, that leaves 85% under 100k. So, most people don't earn that much money. I only know a few people, including two income families, that earn over $100k. One is a doctor and the others are other highly educated, highly paid professionals.
post #177 of 200
Less than $20,000 -- gotta love the Army.

Excellent benefits though. And our house is paid for (about 1700/month)

And last year DH got a $22,500 bonus, which is more than we make in a year.

We live in a very high COL area (Hawaii)

If you factor everything in we're just fine. Our only bills are cell phones, car insurance, and phone/internet. We're definitely on a budget, but we're not hurting for anything.
post #178 of 200
Another thing that might be worth considering with this poll and thread, is some mothers (and their DHs) might be older, having put off having kids to advance their careers or pay down debt or build up savings, while others might have had kids younger in life, and still be climbing up the career and salary ladder.

I didn't make at 22 what I could earn now. So, for 22 year olds to compare themselves to 30 and 40 somethings is a little unrealistic.
post #179 of 200
....

Spring Flower...

Or some, like me, were previously married with no children, had to pay down their ex-spouses debt, then were finally, 10 years later, the same educationally and financially as they were at 20, then remarried and had kids, later in life, with no college education.

post #180 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Purity♥Lake~ View Post
....

Spring Flower...

Or some, like me, were previously married with no children, had to pay down their ex-spouses debt, then were finally, 10 years later, the same educationally and financially as they were at 20, then remarried and had kids, later in life, with no college education.



Starting over can be very hard, but it is often so much better (not easy, just better) than sitting in all the muck of a bad marriage.

Everything will work out. And you've got your new family and children as a blessing.

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