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Income Poll - Page 2

Poll Results: What is your annual household income?

 
  • 5% (30)
    Less than $20,000
  • 8% (44)
    $20,000 to $29,000
  • 12% (64)
    $30,000 to $39,000
  • 10% (53)
    $40,000 to $49,000
  • 12% (62)
    $50,000 to $59,000
  • 12% (61)
    $60,000 to $69,000
  • 7% (37)
    $70,000 to $79,000
  • 5% (28)
    $80,000 to $89,000
  • 4% (24)
    $90,000 to $99,000
  • 20% (101)
    $100,000 or more
504 Total Votes  
post #21 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post


It kills me to see people say 'we're well off but we worked hard for it!'
because I know people who work their @sses off every day but are trapped in poverty nonetheless because of their lack of the privileges I enjoy.
I know I don't 'work harder' than anyone else.
I do think of myself as motivated and driven to succeed but I know the truth to my financial success is largely due to luck and circumstance.
We give what we can charitably in both money and time and encourage our children to give of themselves too,because we know that we don't 'deserve' what we have,
and those we would help don't 'deserve' to to have what they don't, ya know?

Good post.

I often think I'm 'lucky' because I have few health problems.
post #22 of 200
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LolaK View Post
So I have to ask, everyone who posted saying their household income is over $100K also pointed out that they are struggling in some way, or don't have new things, or aren't extravegant. What is wrong with making a good income? Why do you guys sound almost guilty about having money??
I don't feel guilty at all; it's just that when you tell someone you make over $100k/year they get preconceived notions about the type of lifestyle you must lead, and I was pointing out that although our income is high, we don't lead what I would consider to be a monetarily wealthy lifestyle.

If you notice, the posters who wondered about the $100k thing early in this thread talked about MDC's "affluent" population, "no wonder so many mamas here can afford such-and-such," etc. Making a certain income does not necessarily mean that those things are true -- I wanted to paint a more realistic picture of how far $100k really goes for some people, which is not as far as most people think if you live in a high cost-of-living area.
post #23 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post
I voted over 100k. We are very comfortable. We don't struggle. And...I don't think we worked 'hard' to get here. We are both college educated (me, 4 year degree; dh, MBA) and he has a job he *loves*. We own everything we have outright except our home, and we're making some pretty mad progress on the mortgage since we recently sold in FL and moved to the midwest. We have health insurance, retirement funds, college funds, and other investments.

How did we get here? We're lucky. We were born into privilege and are whole in body and sound of mind. We had help with college and a down payment from our affluent families. We've never had a medical catastrophe or disabled child or natural disaster happen to us. We are fully aware of our good luck and privilege and thankful for it every day. We both work hard to make sure our children are aware of it too, though I don't want to be 'preachy' to them I do want them to appreciate their good lives.

It kills me to see people say 'we're well off but we worked hard for it!' because I know people who work their @sses off every day but are trapped in poverty nonetheless because of their lack of the privileges I enjoy. I know I don't 'work harder' than anyone else. I do think of myself as motivated and driven to succeed but I know the truth to my financial success is largely due to luck and circumstance. We give what we can charitably in both money and time and encourage our children to give of themselves too, because we know that we don't 'deserve' what we have, and those we would help don't 'deserve' not to have what they don't, ya know?
I think your response is very thoughtful. Dh and I both grew up in families that struggled financially but there's more to "class" than money. A required reading for a class I'm taking right now is "A framework for understanding poverty" by Ruby Payne. What you're saying jives with what she says in her book- especially the part about working hard people= larger incomes which just isn't true. She lists other factors that contribute to your "station" in life.
We make just over $20,000 but I still would consider us middle class because of the resources we have (family support (and not necessarily financial), access to information, access to education, etc.).
While it's challenging living in our income bracket I don't feel like we're lacking. I think people generally live within their means (or not). What I mean is: if we made a million dollars a year we'd probably spend at least 3/4 of a million a year on whatever. Because we make a little over $20,000 we spend a little under that. It's all relative.
post #24 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post

How did we get here? We're lucky. We were born into privilege and are whole in body and sound of mind. We had help with college and a down payment from our affluent families. We've never had a medical catastrophe or disabled child or natural disaster happen to us. We are fully aware of our good luck and privilege and thankful for it every day. We both work hard to make sure our children are aware of it too, though I don't want to be 'preachy' to them I do want them to appreciate their good lives.

It kills me to see people say 'we're well off but we worked hard for it!' because I know people who work their @sses off every day but are trapped in poverty nonetheless because of their lack of the privileges I enjoy. I know I don't 'work harder' than anyone else. I do think of myself as motivated and driven to succeed but I know the truth to my financial success is largely due to luck and circumstance. We give what we can charitably in both money and time and encourage our children to give of themselves too, because we know that we don't 'deserve' what we have, and those we would help don't 'deserve' not to have what they don't, ya know?
This touched me. Thanks for writing it. I and my husband worked hard to pay our way through school and life, and we have had huge financial setbacks, and feel pretty poor now. I have an advanced degree and years of experience in my field, but am staying home with my child. A combo of bad luck (being born poor too!) and life choices has made us pretty poor, especially for our age group.

C'est la vie.
post #25 of 200
I work and DH SAH. I make $8.35/hr but with all the OT and plasma money I get we make about 25 k a year. Last year DH made about 29 k. We are low income but we have noo debt annd keep our bills down. We are very comfortable.
post #26 of 200
we're right around half of six figures in a very expensive "cost of living" area. so we pretty much struggle to pay the bills and groceries and still have something left over to be able to have some fun. we really need another income but I can't see going back to work for another 3-4 yrs (dd has special needs).

we get quite a bit of help from family (well, from my side of the family).
post #27 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
Wow, $100K + a year? Any commenters on that? There's 16 voters so far...
Yes there have been polls on this before in this forum. The average SAHM here on MDC comes from a much higher income bracket than the average american. Overall MDC is white/ middle/ upper middle class, judging from income polls I've seen here and on other sections of the board..
post #28 of 200
We are right in the middle of the listed incomes, but we live in a higher than average cost of living area. So really that amount doesn't goes as far as it looks like it would unfortunately. We are very frugal in most areas, but we are big into saving our money for a few quality items here and there. I think our money makes it us as "comfortable" as it does because we probably have a different idea than the typical family as to what are necessary expenses.

FWIW, it is extremely hard to really get the big picture from polls like this IMO. Cost of living varies SO much from area to area!
post #29 of 200
we are between 60-70. We have 5 kids so while we get by....
post #30 of 200
Thanks ladies for responding. I was curious since we're a single income family coming in at about $60k this year. We're just getting to where we can get by and have a small savings. We have debt that we're slowly working down and getting our credit back in line. We also rent and right now the thought of a house seems so far off on just one income...
post #31 of 200
Well, actual taxable income, DH makes about 25k a year. Add on allowances (BAH, BAS, COLA) and it's around 55k. Sounds like a lot, but it's not. At least, not where we are in Alaska. 55k where we were in Virginia would've been a lot. When we were in Virginia, our income (with allowances) was maybe 30k.
post #32 of 200
Less than 20.
post #33 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post
I voted over 100k. We are very comfortable. We don't struggle. And...I don't think we worked 'hard' to get here. We are both college educated (me, 4 year degree; dh, MBA) and he has a job he *loves*. We own everything we have outright except our home, and we're making some pretty mad progress on the mortgage since we recently sold in FL and moved to the midwest. We have health insurance, retirement funds, college funds, and other investments.

How did we get here? We're lucky. We were born into privilege and are whole in body and sound of mind. We had help with college and a down payment from our affluent families. We've never had a medical catastrophe or disabled child or natural disaster happen to us. We are fully aware of our good luck and privilege and thankful for it every day. We both work hard to make sure our children are aware of it too, though I don't want to be 'preachy' to them I do want them to appreciate their good lives.

It kills me to see people say 'we're well off but we worked hard for it!' because I know people who work their @sses off every day but are trapped in poverty nonetheless because of their lack of the privileges I enjoy. I know I don't 'work harder' than anyone else. I do think of myself as motivated and driven to succeed but I know the truth to my financial success is largely due to luck and circumstance. We give what we can charitably in both money and time and encourage our children to give of themselves too, because we know that we don't 'deserve' what we have, and those we would help don't 'deserve' not to have what they don't, ya know?
You are an amazing person to recognize your privilege and that you didn't somehow 'work harder' to end up so well off. Thank you for having the mentality that so many others are lacking.
post #34 of 200
Quote:
It kills me to see people say 'we're well off but we worked hard for it!' because I know people who work their @sses off every day but are trapped in poverty nonetheless because of their lack of the privileges I enjoy.
Thank you so much for this post. I'm the single SAHM who posted above. If my X hadn't left, our household income for this year would have been $79k. My household income this year, with child support, a rental income, and the money I get from cleaning our church will be just a smidge over $20k.

"Working hard" is great, but not always enough. I work my @ss off now, and I worked it off back then when we were together, planning for our future. You never know when someone else will completely destroy that all on their own.
post #35 of 200
Quote:
Yes there have been polls on this before in this forum. The average SAHM here on MDC comes from a much higher income bracket than the average american. Overall MDC is white/ middle/ upper middle class, judging from income polls I've seen here and on other sections of the board..
Interesting, I'm new here so haven't seen the polls. I can't say that I'm too surprised, it's long been a fight of mine to get people to address poverty in childhood and more "natural" rearing issues, but it doesn't seem to be a place a lot of people want to go. I'm kinda seeing how Audre Lorde might have felt. *g*

In another post, and I need to get this off my chest, there was the issue of privilege brought up as to accounting to how people have gotten where they are if they were in a higher income.

Now first of all I don't believe that I deserve this money any more than anyone else, otherwise I wouldn't be a card carrying socialist and have been for nearly half my life now. In somehow hell were to freeze over and my political party would win, I can see another 20K added to my tax bill easily! But I'd pay it if I believed it would ensure national daycare programs, or subsidised post secondary tuition.

I don't believe that I've worked harder than say my mother who was a single mom and supported us on a waitresses income, when she could find work.

But I do need to point out that outside of being lucky enough to being born in Canada and speaking English, I am not here because of privilege. I'm not white, able-bodied, I've been homeless at least three times before I was 10, my father was abusive is just about every way, I've gone to bed hungry, was very underweight and chronically ill, I grew up in a community that was rife with drugs, abuse, violence, I've seen people killed, I've had friends killed, well the list goes on.

I am the first person in my family to get a post secondary education. My family is largely native and black and like many in the community are still reeling from issues stemming back from genocide, assimilation and slavery. I had to sleep on this post and think about my ancestors, would they think I'm too proud of my accomplishments?

I am a bit proud, I'll admit it, I've been through a system that is not set up to be too friendly towards people like me and have done a good job. And the best thing about it, is that while I can recognise and address the huge inequities of this system, I am no longer bitter about them.

I don't think I've worked harder than people (especially other visible minorities) living in poverty, I've been there, I know what it's like. Me saying I worked hard, (although glib and I can see that) is not me saying I worked harder than someone else, but it is me recognising that I've done just as well as someone who had a heck of a head start compared to me. I am saying that it's not simply luck or privilege and I've had many a relative come up to me saying "Baby, you've done well, don't let anyone take away from what you've done" and ultimately last night this was what was ringing through my head.

I've never forgotten my roots, I think it's not only ethical, but spiritual mandate to help those who are struggling on the same path, whether with time, money, or what is left in my brain *g*. I'm not going to list my volunteer actions, but lets say they take up a good chunk of my time.

Anyhow, I guess this was a bit of a bee in my bonnet, and I had to get it out, because society doesn't want to judge me on the same standards, that's fine...well it's not, but I can accept that, but I'm not going to be silent when it's assumed that I have done well because of privilege, when the truth is, I had fought tooth and nail-just like many others-just to scrape by, let alone to be where I am and there is no shame in it for me.
post #36 of 200
I'm jealous of the 41 (!) moms whose income is 100K or more :
post #37 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
Wow, $100K + a year? Any commenters on that? There's 16 voters so far...
It won't by you a shed in Southern California.
post #38 of 200
I voted 20-29,000. My husband is in grad school getting his PhD in chemical engineering, and he works for one of the professors. I used to do in home daycare, but I lost my full time boy, and now I have my sister's newborn, but only twice a week, and only until January. We struggle. It's very hard to raise almost 4 kids on this salary, but we have great family support, and I've been able to go back to school part time, so I've beeen taking out loans again. I know it;s not ideal, but John has at least 2 more years of this, so I'm having to get more creative.
post #39 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post
It kills me to see people say 'we're well off but we worked hard for it!' because I know people who work their @sses off every day but are trapped in poverty nonetheless because of their lack of the privileges I enjoy.
But sometimes working hard without privilege will lead to such a life. It's ok to say that, it's an accomplishment. Often that is "studied hard" though rather than "work hard". But studying is also hard work .

Anyway, I see nothing wrong in that.
post #40 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
It won't by you a shed in Southern California.
Same here in Boston.

My husband makes just over 100K a year. We have a very small house on a crowded street next to a loud train with a postage-stamp "yard." We share one small car. When we go on vacation, we combine it with one of his business trips so the hotel and his airfare are paid for.

If we moved one hour north, into a certain part of NH, we could live in a HUGE farmhouse on 5 acres of land with a swimming pool, etc.. for what we pay for our teensy place. (And boy are we thinking of moving!! However, a two hour commute each day isn't all that nice..).

I don't see 100K as being affluent. Here, you need at least 200K to be "well off."

My husband is a self-made man, he has worked round-the-clock all his life, he's a brilliant thinker and very creative, and an entrepeneur. He deserves every cent he makes (and much more). Nothing has come easy for him.
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