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Income Poll - Page 3

Poll Results: What is your annual household income?

 
  • 5% (30)
    Less than $20,000
  • 8% (44)
    $20,000 to $29,000
  • 12% (64)
    $30,000 to $39,000
  • 10% (53)
    $40,000 to $49,000
  • 12% (62)
    $50,000 to $59,000
  • 12% (61)
    $60,000 to $69,000
  • 7% (37)
    $70,000 to $79,000
  • 5% (28)
    $80,000 to $89,000
  • 4% (24)
    $90,000 to $99,000
  • 20% (101)
    $100,000 or more
504 Total Votes  
post #41 of 200
If it weren't for DH, I would be on the streets. I ain't claiming any hard work.
post #42 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedWine View Post
I don't see 100K as being affluent. Here, you need at least 200K to be "well off."
It depends on how we're defining affluent. I'll note that we're 40k on the nose, in a major metropolitan area, and I consider my family quite affluent. Why? We don't struggle to pay our rent or utilities, we're not having to scrimp on our food, and it's not an issue that I don't have an income-earning job. Our essentials are taken care of. Coming from where far too many people, if they can find work, which itself is too rare, can barely even afford the cost of food and transportation, let alone thinking about having kids or living away from their families, this is affluence in an affluent society. That's not something to be embarrassed about or to skirt around -- it's a statement of admitting my blessings. Those of us who are skirting the poverty line or dipping below and making it work are blowing me away with their perseverence and resourcefulness, because I know I couldn't do it and stay sane. The rest of us ... whether at 40k or 100k ... the tendency to say "oh, it's not so much" is nagging at me a little bit. I'm not dripping gold, and neither are you. I'm not 100% debt-free, and neither are you. I'm not driving fancy cars, living in mansions, or sitting on huge nest eggs, and neither are you. But we're still affluent ... we're still incredibly blessed.
post #43 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
But sometimes working hard without privilege will lead to such a life. It's ok to say that, it's an accomplishment. Often that is "studied hard" though rather than "work hard". But studying is also hard work .

Anyway, I see nothing wrong in that.
Everyone posting on this poll has an enormous amount of privilege. We speak English, live in first world countries, have internet access, and think that $20k is the *bottom* of the income poll. If people don't recognize that I hope there is some enlightenment in their futures. Is there anyone here who's never had the opportunity to learn to read, to eat a steak, to ride in a privately owned vehicle? Now I probably do sound preachy but my intent is just to point out that if you're able to have an intelligent discussion on quantifying privilege, then you've got a healthy helping of it yourself.
post #44 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post
Everyone posting on this poll has an enormous amount of privilege. We speak English, live in first world countries, have internet access, and think that $20k is the *bottom* of the income poll. If people don't recognize that I hope there is some enlightenment in their futures. Is there anyone here who's never had the opportunity to learn to read, to eat a steak, to ride in a privately owned vehicle? Now I probably do sound preachy but my intent is just to point out that if you're able to have an intelligent discussion on quantifying privilege, then you've got a healthy helping of it yourself.

This really is true. I live in Alaska. Rather expensive place to live. But probably half the people who live in this state (don't know exact stats) don't even have indoor plumbing. Sometimes my hubby and I can get caught up in what we don't have that it seems so many in our town do (snowmachines, for example) when you can go to a kazillion places in our state where people live in villages without indoor plumbing. I never really thought of a toilet as a luxury, but it is. I can't imagine having to go to the outhouse when it's 30 below 0 outside.
post #45 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PajamaMama View Post
Everyone posting on this poll has an enormous amount of privilege. We speak English, live in first world countries, have internet access, and think that $20k is the *bottom* of the income poll. If people don't recognize that I hope there is some enlightenment in their futures. Is there anyone here who's never had the opportunity to learn to read, to eat a steak, to ride in a privately owned vehicle? Now I probably do sound preachy but my intent is just to point out that if you're able to have an intelligent discussion on quantifying privilege, then you've got a healthy helping of it yourself.
This is kinda shifting focus.

I don't think anyone is really putting down their privilege they have now. (Though for my income, it still doesn't stop people from looking at my skin colour and thinking I'm uneducated or the lady in Costco demanding to see my membership card, after letting 20 white people in front of me go without so much as a blink) I do see people saying that money doesn't stretch as far as one may think in their area, but no where do I see people saying how poorly off they are. However people are saying, myself included, that we haven't always had that place of privilege and we've had to struggle to get to it. Yes I grew up in Canada, and am very lucky, but people need to realise that not everywhere in North America is this great big well of opportunity set out the same for everyone.

I live in a city where many people come from countries, some have been tortured, some have fled war, famine, tyranny etc. Many came to this country as refugees and have, despite a lot of odds, gotten to the point where they can eat steak, have internet access etc. I think it would do nothing but devalue their accomplishments to dismiss even a large part to privilege. Yes, there is that privilege of coming to this country, but there are still a heck of a lot of barriers to people who are non-white, not native english speakers, etc. It's ignoring their experiences and struggles in a society that has barriers set up for for many people based on their identities.

I think that a one size fits all glove in ascribing privilege in North American society is not taking into account, or valuing the experiences of countless people and their paths. I think it is the source of a fracture I see in feminism (and believe me, I have been educated/"enlightened" to the nines about privilege formally and informally since I was about 14, I just see it from a different POV than yourself. *G*) because women aren't recognising or valuing other women's experiences. A book I read a few years ago "Colonize This" I think might help to shed some light. But now I'm getting offtrack so I'll digress.
post #46 of 200
so are we answering the poll for gross or net then?
post #47 of 200
Quote:
The rest of us ... whether at 40k or 100k ... the tendency to say "oh, it's not so much" is nagging at me a little bit. I'm not dripping gold, and neither are you. I'm not 100% debt-free, and neither are you. I'm not driving fancy cars, living in mansions, or sitting on huge nest eggs, and neither are you. But we're still affluent ... we're still incredibly blessed.
I agree, it's all relative and certainly we should acknowledge our privileges. But to me, paying rent and having food doesn't make you affluent, and I'm not sure anyone benefits from saying it does. DH makes about 110K before taxes. When I was in college, I would have thought that was HUGE. But we live in a small 2-bedroom apartment well outside city limits, drive a Saturn (Apparently the classic car of the proletariat! ) and have no savings to speak of... unless you count the jar of change by my bed. Right now I'm putting off some badly needed dental work because, even with insurance the out-of-pocket is a lot of money. I consider a 6" Veggie Delight from Subway ($2.99!) to be a rare dinner out and have only bought 1 new pair of pants this year (desperately needed and from target!) Between credit card debt from medical expenses and student loan debt, not to mention the price of gas and housing, I think I'm "getting by." Heck, the only reason I have internet is because DH works for the cable company and it's free.

I'm not going to claim that I'm not blessed... but affluent? It just seems to me that there should be some middle ground to acknowledge privilege, but still be able to say "Hey, there's something wrong here when even a professional job doesn't keep the lentils and rice off a weekly rotation!" The median income in my city is 40k- we make over double that and still can't afford a house. So if affluent = paying rent and getting by through scrimping, then filthy rich = buying a house and taking a vacation? I don't know. It's good to recognize that their are those less privileged who work just as hard. But I think it helps ALL of us more to say that there are serious problems with the economy and something needs to change fast, rather than saying that we're all upper class now because the middle and lower class have fallen so far.
post #48 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsBasilThyme View Post
... I don't know. It's good to recognize that their are those less privileged who work just as hard. But I think it helps ALL of us more to say that there are serious problems with the economy and something needs to change fast, rather than saying that we're all upper class now because the middle and lower class have fallen so far.
That is an excellent point.
post #49 of 200
I definitely agree, and I know my political party (NDP or socialist for non Canadians) has been making as much noise as we can about the economy and that the gap is growing bigger and bigger, and that there is something fundamentally flawed with that.
post #50 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post
It depends on how we're defining affluent.
I'm defining affluent as never having to budget. Not having to hesitate signing up for whatever classes your kids want ot take. Being able to afford two cars, have a nice retirement account in the making, being able to travel overseas every year for 2-3 weeks. Splurgin on designer shoes without giving it a second's thought. Not reckless spending, but being able to afford nice stuff all the time without ever having to worry about the price tag. Center orchestra seats for every theater production you go to. Fine dining once a week (plus the babysitter's fee).

I dunno...we were just a an awards ceremony where most people had at least $50 million...a house on Park Avenue plus a house in the South of France, etc. Now THAT'S affluent! So perhaps my perception of wealthy has been recently warped.
post #51 of 200
We make around $65K a year and are comfortable. I think that it's absurd that there so many people stating "that a $100,000 doesn't go as far as it used to" and such. I know that once you make more you tend to by more expensive things without thinking. I also realize that going natural tends to cost more but I think pleople really need to examine thier spending habits if it is "tight" and they are making 6 figures..
post #52 of 200
I voted 20k or less.... but 20k is take home... now that I've voted I think you mean pre-tax. Which isn't much more, but it would put us into the 20k-29k bracket.

We struggle a bit and do live paycheck to paycheck for the most part. But there is food on our table, we own our home and have two (by no means new) paid off cars, our bills are paid. Sure, we don't have much money for extras, but that's just the way it is.

I've been much worse off in the past, so I'll happily take this any day!
post #53 of 200
Quote:
I think that it's absurd that there so many people stating "that a $100,000 doesn't go as far as it used to" and such. I know that once you make more you tend to by more expensive things without thinking. I also realize that going natural tends to cost more but I think pleople really need to examine thier spending habits if it is "tight" and they are making 6 figures..
Hey- you're more than welcome to examine my spending habits if you could help out. I'm happy to try anything.
post #54 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mama View Post
We make around $65K a year and are comfortable. I think that it's absurd that there so many people stating "that a $100,000 doesn't go as far as it used to" and such. I know that once you make more you tend to by more expensive things without thinking. I also realize that going natural tends to cost more but I think pleople really need to examine thier spending habits if it is "tight" and they are making 6 figures..
We don't have cable, we don't spend money on practically anything. Our teensy house is half our income. The rest goes toward our used Honda Civic, public transit tokens, and clothes/school supplies for the girls.

If you live in an expensive part of the country, things can be twice as much as they are elsewhere.
post #55 of 200
Quote:
We struggle a bit and do live paycheck to paycheck for the most part. But there is food on our table, we own our home and have two (by no means new) paid off cars, our bills are paid. Sure, we don't have much money for extras, but that's just the way it is.
This is amazing to me. Maybe I should start a thread about cheaper places to live than where I am. I'll be honest- I can't fathom owning a house on 20k. I just did CNN's money calculator and it says the most expensive house on that budget (assuming no debt) is 30-40k. I can't think of anyplace where you can buy land big enough to put a house on for that. You're doing an amazing job with budgeting. I really want to own a house, but I can't seem to find extra money anywhere.
post #56 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsBasilThyme View Post
This is amazing to me. Maybe I should start a thread about cheaper places to live than where I am. I'll be honest- I can't fathom owning a house on 20k. I just did CNN's money calculator and it says the most expensive house on that budget (assuming no debt) is 30-40k. I can't think of anyplace where you can buy land big enough to put a house on for that. You're doing an amazing job with budgeting. I really want to own a house, but I can't seem to find extra money anywhere.
Our home was 60k w/ no down payment (and we had bad credit, go figure). It IS a larger chunk of our income than it "should" be. We technically have little debt, and the home was a foreclosure, the bank was looking to unload it and we had NO trouble getting a mortgage with the way the housing market is right now.... our income before taxes is about 22-23k.

We just make it work, I guess.
post #57 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
It won't by you a shed in Southern California.
Even if I did make $100,000, I wouldn't WANT to live in So CA.

Or Boston.
post #58 of 200
Quote:
Our home was 60k w/ no down payment (and we had bad credit, go figure). It IS a larger chunk of our income than it "should" be. We technically have little debt, and the home was a foreclosure
That's really awesome, Daisie. It makes me really optimistic to hear about others who have been able to buy through forclosures and low down payment options. Anyway, I'm totally getting off topic, but I appreciated the response!
post #59 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Purity♥Lake~ View Post
Even if I did make $100,000, I wouldn't WANT to live in So CA.

Or Boston.
Me neither, I am hoping we can move to southern NH in the near future. I really like the area we live in in terms of cultures, classes, etc... but it makes me sick when I think about what we're spending on our mortgage. We could be living in a MUCH nicer place with lots of land, etc.! I hate the high cost of living around here.
post #60 of 200
I'm starting to wonder if some of this isn't a matter of perspective (please don't think I'm picking on anyone here) but perhaps what I think of as struggling is what other people think of as dirt poor... we probably are "struggling" in other people's eyes. DH and I have lived literally on bread and water and ramen noodles for WEEKS. I've been homeless with zero income before. (Thankfully we had enough friends and family that we were able to couch jump through that) When we got our first apartment and DH made 225/week and our rent was 640 a month... THAT was struggling to me. We had $260 a month to pay all of our bills and eat.
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