or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Nutrition and Good Eating › Traditional Foods › How to tell if kefir is bad? Smell of yeast, beer??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to tell if kefir is bad? Smell of yeast, beer??

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
A friend of mine made kefir. The jars were cleaned the same, same paket of powder and same gallon of raw milk. She left hers out 12 hours in a warm kitchen, I left mine 24 hours in my coller kitchen. Hers is creamy and smooth, a little sweet. Mine smells like fresh milk, but is grainy, and tart to taste.

Is mine bad?? Or, do you always use rule of - nose.... if it doesn't smell bad, it is good??

Thanks,
mihcelle
post #2 of 11
Yeah that's kind of my rule. And if it smells bad, I usually use it in cooking.

Only way I'd say kefir is so bad it can't be used is if were growing mold.
post #3 of 11
What do you cook with Kefir?
post #4 of 11
Pancakes!
post #5 of 11
Oooooh recipe?
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by fourgrtkidos View Post
A friend of mine made kefir. The jars were cleaned the same, same paket of powder and same gallon of raw milk. She left hers out 12 hours in a warm kitchen, I left mine 24 hours in my coller kitchen. Hers is creamy and smooth, a little sweet. Mine smells like fresh milk, but is grainy, and tart to taste.

Is mine bad?? Or, do you always use rule of - nose.... if it doesn't smell bad, it is good??
Sounds like yours just got more fermented. Well done kefir is supposed to taste sour. It will be lumpy, and you should give it a good stir before straining so it smooths out. If using a packet starter instead of grains, just give it a good stir or blend with a hand mixer to get the smooth texture.

I always make mine well done to make sure most of the lactose is consumed. I usually blend my kefir with fruit like strawberries and a banana and a spoonful of honey. It makes a really yummy smoothie.

You can also use kefir like buttermilk or sour cream in baking recipes if you are worried, but of course, baking will kill the beneficial bacteria and yeasts.
post #7 of 11
I use kefir for soaking grains mostly, and if it isn't too sour I make kefir cheese with it. If it is too sour, I sometimes mix it with some mild kefir and it still works for me. Salt seems very important to the kefir cheese.

Cucumbers, grated and in kefir with some garlic that's been mashed in a mortar with salt taste amazingly good with roast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stilllearning85 View Post
Oooooh recipe?
[non-TF warning] :

I've done the pancakes. I use this recipe when I've made them and DH seems to approve. I imagine any buttermilk recipe will work, this one was just the simplest and it works for me. I use melted CO and usually no sugar but I've been known to put in some fancy health food sugar too. WW flour of course.

I also do the Irish Soda Bread and if I'm in a good mood, I add dried fruit to it and sweetener of some sort.

[/non-TF section]



You're supposed to make sourdough pancakes and sourdough type quickbread. I've done both and they do work.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks!!
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Forgot to ask.... what if it strts to smell like beer, kinda yeasty.... then what, throw it out??
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
bump
post #11 of 11
You can still cook with it if it doesn't smell right. When I was bringing my grains back (they'd gone dormant) I made the soda bread for all my friends because it seemed like a waste to pitch it.

You're not using grains, right? I'm not sure then why your kefir isn't turning out good - usually the starter packets work the first time around.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Traditional Foods
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › Nutrition and Good Eating › Traditional Foods › How to tell if kefir is bad? Smell of yeast, beer??