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Emotions and nutrient deficiencies - Page 2

post #21 of 61
Well, we have a gluten-free house, plus I just went to an awesome lecture about gluten. So my view is skewed. But, this must be included in this discussion. There is a huge number of people walking around with gluten problems that don't know it.

If you do have a gluten sensitivity, then you are not properly absorbing much. That will create deficiencies. It can also create emotional disturbances, because our gut is largely responsible for our emotions. If our guts can't create the right chemicals (seratonin being one) then our emotional status changes.

You can throw lots of different vitamins & minerals into your body, but it will not absorb if you have gut damage from gluten.
post #22 of 61
Thread Starter 
I cooked up a pound of chicken liver yeasterday. I feel a lot better.

I would like to eat liver several times a week but I don't have a regular source for pastured livers. I have two more pounds in the freezer and that's it. So, I'm going to take a B complex and see how that does it. I'm also going to get some of the nutritional yeast variants, I just have to find which ones my HFS carries and which ones are worth it.

I would love to see a TCM practitioner but there isn't one here in town and driving to St. Louis or Kansas City isn't an option. It's definitely on my list.

It's scaring me how may symptoms I have, pointing to so many different systems in the body.

Re: gluten
I have gone down the 'no bread' route before and I seem to do a lot better. My PCOS symptoms improve when I go low carb and going off bread used to be pretty much low carb since I grew up with bread at every meal.

I don't seem to be disciplined enough to go completely off sugar and bread this time around. I have all these reasons that individually aren't much but they somehow add up for me. It's a crazy spiral, I don't cook because I'm down but I bet I'm (at least in part) down because I keep eating bad food.

Thanks for the reminder, Pilgrim.
post #23 of 61
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post #24 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilgrim View Post
Well, we have a gluten-free house, plus I just went to an awesome lecture about gluten. So my view is skewed. But, this must be included in this discussion. There is a huge number of people walking around with gluten problems that don't know it.

If you do have a gluten sensitivity, then you are not properly absorbing much. That will create deficiencies. It can also create emotional disturbances, because our gut is largely responsible for our emotions. If our guts can't create the right chemicals (seratonin being one) then our emotional status changes.

You can throw lots of different vitamins & minerals into your body, but it will not absorb if you have gut damage from gluten.

I wanted to reiterate this, as this was totally the case for me. I had an undiagnosed gluten sensitivity for years and had horrible nutrient absorbption (how do you spell that?) because of it.
post #25 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by quietserena View Post
Re: gluten
I have gone down the 'no bread' route before and I seem to do a lot better. My PCOS symptoms improve when I go low carb and going off bread used to be pretty much low carb since I grew up with bread at every meal.

I don't seem to be disciplined enough to go completely off sugar and bread this time around. I have all these reasons that individually aren't much but they somehow add up for me. It's a crazy spiral, I don't cook because I'm down but I bet I'm (at least in part) down because I keep eating bad food.
Check out any of the books by Kathleen DesMaisons or Dr. Mercola's "Total Health Program". These books combined have helped me learn how to tackle the enormous obstacle called grains/sugars in my life. Just doing a little at a time, but I am doing soooo much better. And I can tell a huge difference in my emotional health when I'm being more careful. I have pcos, too, and any grains/beans really seem to bother me. I know sugars do, too, but I'm trying harder to cut those down and replace them with more natural sugars.
post #26 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristenok18 View Post
I've been reading Kathleen DesMaisons book "Potatoes, Not Prozac". While it's definitely not TF, it does explain the intricate way in which carbohydrates can affect our brain chemistry. It's very interesting! I'm not really reading it for her meal advice, but I am interested in observing how various foods affect my emotional state and physical state. The book is specifically aimed at people who are sugar sensitive, which I definitely am. On top of which I have pcos, so I'm working hard to combat my food demons and find a way to eat that really works for my body.

You can find much of the same info from Des Maisons' books at her website (Radiant Recovery dot com), in the Resources section.

I followed her plan (loosely) for about two years to change my eating habits and get sugar out of my life. While there are things I don't like about her plan and how that website is run (the forum part), I can say that the plan is a good place to start for people who want to break their dependency on sugar. And while it is not TF, it can dovetail nicely with TF.

Iris
post #27 of 61
What is the difference between "gluten sensitivity" and "gluten intolerance" and Celiacs disease?

I definitely have sensitivity issues with sugar/sweeteners and white flour products. And sometimes I wonder if I have a gluten sensitivity.

Earlier this year I ask my doc to test me for Celiac's disease. She ordered two tests: Gliadian antibodies IgA and IgG. My levels on both came back at <3, with the normal reference range of <11. Were those the right tests to order? Does it mean anything that I did show some antibodies present, even though they were in the "normal" range? At the time of the testing, I had only been eating whole grain products, and not much of them. I hadn't had any white flour products for a long time, and later I wondered if that might skew the tests somehow.

How do people find out if they have a gluten sensitivity?

Iris
post #28 of 61
I think that a 2 week elimination diet and challenge would show you for sure if you were intolerant to the gluten. I also had the IgA test exept mine came back very high and I was eating the occasional Ezequiel bread at that point. Gluten makes me feel sleepy and too full. My best friend did a challenge and felt sleepy and very bloated.

I think the IgA test would come back higher if you had Celiac. I am pretty sure it is one of the indicators. Then you go in for a more involved test (intestinal biospy?) which I never did.

Hopefully someone can explain the different levels of gluten intolerance because I am kind of confused on that one myself...

Jen
post #29 of 61
For myself, magnesium is what calms my rage. B vitamins give me more energy, and joie de vivre. For postpartum issues, I took a 'lesser' Carlson clo, it was what I had. But the extra efa's from the larger dose really seemed to help. Amino acids help me some, too. Right now I've been focusing on iodine and selenium, which have helped my thyroid sluggishness. We're poor. So I can rarely afford everything I need all at once. But when I forget the magnesium, the rage is worse. Without b vitamins or iodine, energy level is down. I do have liver stagnation, which exacerbates everything (esp. my oversupply), but my accupuncturist forgot to renew his license in my state, so I haven't been able to work on that lately (he's a friends' brother, so I could afford him). For temporary 'feel good', you can take 5-htp, a metabolite of serotonin, Sam-e (expensive) or inositol (a b vitamin, getting sleepy, sorry) and there's an awesome thread in the Mental Health forum about postpartum depression. Magnesium citrate (Natural Calm) is great.
post #30 of 61
Thread Starter 
Thanks provocativa. I was just thinking about magnesium and wondering when the last time I took it was.. heh.
post #31 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildIris View Post
What is the difference between "gluten sensitivity" and "gluten intolerance" and Celiacs disease?

I definitely have sensitivity issues with sugar/sweeteners and white flour products. And sometimes I wonder if I have a gluten sensitivity.

Earlier this year I ask my doc to test me for Celiac's disease. She ordered two tests: Gliadian antibodies IgA and IgG. My levels on both came back at <3, with the normal reference range of <11. Were those the right tests to order? Does it mean anything that I did show some antibodies present, even though they were in the "normal" range? At the time of the testing, I had only been eating whole grain products, and not much of them. I hadn't had any white flour products for a long time, and later I wondered if that might skew the tests somehow.

How do people find out if they have a gluten sensitivity?

Iris
OK, this is my pet topic these days. Ds has celiac.

First off, gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance are just what they sound like. A person reacts to gluten and feels better when not consuming it. This can sometimes be "early" celiac, and often times there is some damage being done to the gut.

Celiac is an autoimmune disease. The body attacks itself in the presence of gluten, destroying the villi in the (small?) intestines. Sometimes it will cause the body to attack other organs (such as the pancreas, the thyroid, or the central nervous system), initiating other autoimmune diseases.

As for testing, the testing your dr. did was incomplete. There should also be an anti-tissue transglutaminase test, and I think one other (endomesial something or other?). And even if she had ordered those and they also came back "normal", you could still have a problem with gluten, and even have celiac. The tests have a fairly high rate of false negatives when it comes to celiac, and they don't detect "just" gluten sensitivity. There has to be significant damage to the gut before they show anything. After the blood tests, an intestinal biopsy is usually done in order to positively diagnose celiac. As I understand it, it's a pretty awful test (which is why we chose not to subject ds to it).

There is an alternative test, which, as I understand it, is becoming more widely recognized by GI docs. It is the Enterolab test(s), which is a stool test, and is much more sensitive than blood tests (the IgA is produced in the gut, and for there to be any in the blood there has to be major damage and leaking in the gut). It can pick up a problem before the damage is so great. The Enterolab tests can't diagnose celiac, but if a combination of their tests all point toward celiac, the person likely has it.

As Jen mentioned, an elimination diet is the best test. Although some people find that 2 weeks is not enough. It sometimes takes a couple months or more. And if you have an autoimmune disease, it's probably wise to avoid regardless (I've read this in various places, and the more I learn about the topic, the more sense it makes). As an example, I have MS. I have been gluten free because of my son. At least it started out that way. I had the enterolab test done, and the result came back on the high end of normal. I also didn't feel any differently after going GF. I occasionally had a little gluten (finishing off some things we had in the house), and had no reaction. After months of being GF (and no challenges for a long time), I noticed some things that had improved for me. For instance my feet, which had been numb for 3 yrs., stopped being numb. And more subtle things, like the post nasal drip I'd had for almost 20 yrs. went away. And I haven't had an exacerbation since going GF almost 2 yrs. ago (yay!!). Of course the absence of something is hard to prove.

Hope this wasn't too far off topic.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!
post #32 of 61
The Mood Cure

It changed my life. And it was actually the springboard that got me moving toward TF.
Here's that thread from PostPartum Depression that discusses it (and the topic of moods&nutrition generally and specifically) where I first heard of the book:

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=195601

An amino acid they recommend for a number of things is GABA: Gamma Amino Butyric Acid.
It helps me sleep because it helps me slow down my thought enough to drift off. Without it I tend to lie there thinking about every little stressful thing, making lists and plans and so forth...
Then I discovered that on those PMSy days when everything makes me mad and I start to get snappy at the kids, I can take a GABA and I'm more able to take a deep breath and put one foot in front of the other without exploding at everyone around me.

The book definitely talks a lot about the importance of quality protein and fat. The points they make about this stuff is what got me wondering about whether my vegetarian diet is the best for me... now I'm dabbling in a little broth and CLO for the first time in my life.

Another plug for Magnesium, too.
And definitely Acupuncture. It has helped me through sooooo much, especially all the stuff that comes up for me when I'm pregnant.
post #33 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramlita View Post
An amino acid they recommend for a number of things is GABA: Gamma Amino Butyric Acid.
It helps me sleep because it helps me slow down my thought enough to drift off. Without it I tend to lie there thinking about every little stressful thing, making lists and plans and so forth...
Then I discovered that on those PMSy days when everything makes me mad and I start to get snappy at the kids, I can take a GABA and I'm more able to take a deep breath and put one foot in front of the other without exploding at everyone around me.
This totally describes me. I'll have to look into this! I have that book on hold at the library, that's my next week's reading.

PMS seems to make me not sleep and extra snappy and add that into being tired and i'm *horrible*.
post #34 of 61
Oh yes. I loved GABA when I was recovering from all my postpartum depression/axiety. It is amazingly effective (and I used to take Xanax!). If I started feeling anxious/frustrated I could just open a capsule and pour some under my tongue and in 30 minutes feel calm.
post #35 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newcastlemama View Post
Oh yes. I loved GABA when I was recovering from all my postpartum depression/axiety. It is amazingly effective (and I used to take Xanax!). If I started feeling anxious/frustrated I could just open a capsule and pour some under my tongue and in 30 minutes feel calm.
Wow! this I gotta try!
post #36 of 61
Occaisionally I buy sublingual gaba, my daughter loves the orange flavor. It is very calming. . . . and it's fun to say gammaaminiobutryicacid, especially fun when talking to people who don't believe that nutritional supplements can help. For some reason when something scientific rolls off your tongue, they start to listen.
post #37 of 61
Thread Starter 
Hah!

So true.

I haven't done anything I said I'd do.

This has been a bad few weeks for me. Really trying hard not to lose it but being in pain constantly is really exhausting.

Cracked nipples that never seem to heal (psoriasis) and I want to keep nursing DD but now she's starting to refuse, probably because I'm giving her signals that it hurts me, and that's all adding to mommy guilt and just dragging me down. I'm going to get some mother's milk tea today and start drinking it because my supply is dropping since she's refusing the boob so much. :
post #38 of 61


Nipple pain!!!!! Arghhhhh!!! It's the worst.
I hate to jump up with something out of left field, but do you use homeopathics much?
Here are some remedies that might help:

http://www.truestarhealth.com/Notes/2252009.html

Do you still have some Magnesium on hand?
Thinking of you.
post #39 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by quietserena View Post
Hah!

So true.

I haven't done anything I said I'd do.

This has been a bad few weeks for me. Really trying hard not to lose it but being in pain constantly is really exhausting.

Cracked nipples that never seem to heal (psoriasis) and I want to keep nursing DD but now she's starting to refuse, probably because I'm giving her signals that it hurts me, and that's all adding to mommy guilt and just dragging me down. I'm going to get some mother's milk tea today and start drinking it because my supply is dropping since she's refusing the boob so much. :
Oh Serena, my heart goes out to you. I'm sorry you are struggling. Reading your posts brings back memories of when my kids were babies and how hard some of those days (weeks/months/years!) were. I feel like I had years of "really trying hard not to lose it."

It seems I struggled constantly with depression and anxiety and exhaustion and stress, and the ever-present guilt from feeling like I could never be the kind of mom I really wanted to be. It was more of just trying to survive from one day to the next. I felt very alone sometimes, with no family around to help me and a DH who wanted to be supportive but really couldn't understand about the depression and anxiety issues and didn't know how to help.

As for mommy guilt...I only managed to BF my oldest DD for 6 weeks. I took antidepressants throughout my second and third pregnancies. With DS, my second baby, I managed to BF for 10 months and felt really good about that. But with my third baby, my youngest DD, I only made it to 6 months and had to stop because I had to start a second antidepressant (was already on one AD but still horribly depressed). As you can imagine, I had horrible guilt over all of these situations and constantly felt like a failure. One thing I didn't know then, that would have made a world of difference, was that I was suffering from an undiagnosed autoimmune thyroid disorder. Also, if I had known then what I know now about food and nutrition, I feel I would have been a much better mother.

However, I know I was doing the best I could do at the time, with the knowledge and information I had then. And I have to say that despite what I see as all my mistakes and failings, my kids are doing pretty well. At 13, 9, and almost 7, they are overall very happy and healthy and smart and well-adjusted. Most of all, they feel very loved and secure. So I guess I didn't do all that badly after all when I look at it that way.

I share all this (probably TMI, sorry) just to say that I can relate to what you're feeling right now. It is a struggle when they are little and need so much and we feel so depleted. It is easy to find lots of reasons to beat ourselves up and feel mommy guilt over all the things we're doing wrong. Try to give yourself credit for all the things you're doing right, too.

I want to say, also, that reducing/eliminating sugar is key for my health and sanity. I have been struggling the past couple weeks, too, and I know a big part of that is because I have let sugar creep back into my diet.

I know I feel my best when I make a point to eat breakfast (high protein/complex carb) as soon as possible after I wake up, and to eat a regular lunch and dinner, too--both of these as high protein/complex carb meals, or something very nutrient dense like bone broth soup. If I do have sugar, I have it with meals, never alone. I am working right now on cutting down on sugars again, because I know I will feel better emotionally. I wish I would have made that connection when my kids were babies, because I think I would have felt more stable emotionally and not struggled as much.

Okay, enough of my rambling...just please know that I am thinking of you today and you are in my prayers. Feel free to PM if you ever want to chat privately.

Hugs,
Iris
post #40 of 61
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

I was thinking earlier how I'd come back to this thread and find no responses. Imagine my surprise!

I broke down yesterday and decided I'd use the prescription cream to get rid of psoriasis lesions on my nipples. My LC and I talked about it, she looked it up and it seems that what I have is probably as low risk as it can get. (Protopic, if you're interested.) She's still researching to see whether there's a better alternative but I'm afraid this is it. I'm only using it on one nipple, just in case I have some sort of a crazy reaction, at least I can still BF dd.

I bought fenugreek and Mother's Milk tea earlier too. DD has actually been asking to nurse which is awesome.

I'm going to find some way to just sit around and drink this tea and send good vibes to my boobs. Yknow, the whole "healing cracks, milk in abundance, you are loved" sort of thing.
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