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Homeschool friendly states - Page 4

post #61 of 105
Does anyone have any experience HS'ing in New York?
post #62 of 105
I've got to agree with the other votes on Washington. I love it! I've never felt watched or anything. It took less time to get ok'd for homeschooling (I got a certificate to be a hs'er) then to register a child for school!
post #63 of 105
I always feel like it is too good to be true in AZ as we aren't required to show any proof of our work and we don't have to test our children.

here is some stats I got off of HSLDA

Arizona
According to the Arizona State Department of Education, 1,123 homeschooled children in grades 1-9, on the average, scored above grade level in reading, language arts, and math on standardized tests for the 1988-89 school year. Four grades tested were a full grade level ahead

However...I couldn't find any newer stats!
post #64 of 105
I have to put my vote in for New Mexico!

Online notification once year (anonymously, don’t have to name kids) and that’s it! Takes me probably 30 seconds to do... No testing, no recordkeeping – nada. The notification is probably for statistical purposes only, too. They do list requirements (at least GED of parent, 181 days, shot records), but no one ever sees them or asks for them, and we hs’ers often wonder why those requirements are even listed (probably just to make the state “look” good LOL!).

HSLDA is a great place to look up state requirements to compare. I think Alaska is probably the best, because I don’t think they have to do an absolute thing except to just do it!

As for hs friendly towns – all of NM is pretty hs friendly. Lots of activities, museums, etc. cater to hs’ers. In the larger towns (Alb. & Santa Fe) there are many hs groups. Our little town in which we live in northern NM has 750 kids enrolled in elementary public school, and at least (probably more, because I know of people who did not register their kids) who are hs’d. So that might give you an idea of how hs friendly we are.
post #65 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by janetcost View Post
NJ - believe it or not! We have no requirements such as reporting, submitting lesson plans or testing. We have the country (dairy farms, organic farms, horseback riding, every animal you can imagine) lakes, streams, rivers, THE OCEAN, boating, skiing, surfing, ALL FOUR SEASONS - there is really nothing I can think of that you can't do in NJ. Every cultural background on the planet, you can get to NY city and Philly with 1-2 hours...broadway, NY museums, HISTORY (as much as you can take), GREAT state parks and parks programs, I could go on forever.

Sometimes I complain about living here - but really it works very well for our homeschooling lifestyle!
Yup... we don't have to do a thing for the state. N O T H I N G. Beach to mountains in a 2-hour or less drive. I live in central NJ and have NYC 1 hour away, Philly 1-1/2 hours away, Baltimore 2-1/2 hours away and chickens in my backyard. I'm on the edge of suburbia where it starts getting a little more rural.

Plenty of hsing groups--secular AND religious. Depending on where you are there are more facilities offering programs to hsers (like the local YMCAs and stores like Learning Express, Creative Hands, etc.). Down in south NJ there's even a homeschool academy for kids to attend 1 day/week for specific lessons (they choose from a variety) to get well-supervised social interaction and learning in a group setting (this is for a fee, though). There are support groups and coops even in the areas where hsing isn't the norm.

And yeah--you can't beat the diversity here.
post #66 of 105
I think MO is very homeschool friendly. I'm a second-generation homeschooler. We had/have to log x amount of hours for a few subjects, but it's just-in-case. No annual reporting or anything. Lot's of groups and resources!
post #67 of 105

Checking on the laws

Dependable web pages that are known to be accurate and inclusive are listed in links within this one:

homeschooling laws - Lillian
post #68 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Calla~ View Post
Does anyone have any experience HS'ing in New York?
We do! We've been hsing our oldest going on 4 years. NY is one of the highest regulated states, requiring an IHIP, quarterly reports, and an annual assessment with testing required every other year starting in grade 4. It's do-able, but we want out of being regulated period. Shopping for land in a 'green' state.
post #69 of 105
Michigan has been good to me (I was homeschooled from birth to 2004)... I can not ever recall my parents having any issues with the government. There were no reports, testing, NOTHING. My brother and I both played sports for a homeschool team that played against private schools. There were always lots of activities for homeschoolers to go to. Not that I'd advise anyone to move here with our economy so bad!
post #70 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by janetcost View Post
NJ - believe it or not! We have no requirements such as reporting, submitting lesson plans or testing. We have the country (dairy farms, organic farms, horseback riding, every animal you can imagine) lakes, streams, rivers, THE OCEAN, boating, skiing, surfing, ALL FOUR SEASONS - there is really nothing I can think of that you can't do in NJ. Every cultural background on the planet, you can get to NY city and Philly with 1-2 hours...broadway, NY museums, HISTORY (as much as you can take), GREAT state parks and parks programs, I could go on forever.

Sometimes I complain about living here - but really it works very well for our homeschooling lifestyle!
Got to agree with New Jersey! NO requirements. We are SO close to NYC and all the day trips you can imagine. History, too, like she said.
post #71 of 105
Kansas is a great state for homeschooling. There are no regulations at this time. One thing I've been told to register as a private school and we're in the clear. I haven't done this, I don't see the need to do it because it's not even the law. There's a book that gives a state by state grade rating of the "homeschool friendliness" of each state....I can't remember the name of it and I'm not at home right now where I can get to my book shelf . Kansas was given an A-. I will try to post that book's title later.
post #72 of 105
Kansas is easy legally.

There are compulsory school attendance laws for kids between 7 and 18.
Kansas doesn't authorize homeschooling by state statute but recognizes non-accredited private schools- which is how homeschools are classified in KS.

Quote:
Non-accredited private schools are required by law to register the name and address of the private elementary or secondary school (homeschool) with the State Board of Education.
Registration consists of completing a form provided by the state showing the name and address of the school and the name and address of the official custodian of the school’s records.
Registration of your non-accredited private school is done once and is very simple. You don't even give your children's names. It can be done online.
I don't see any reason to not register.

There is no testing or monitoring.

http://www.ksde.org/Default.aspx?tabid=1684

Maybe not so friendly in terms of lower numbers of support groups and having to travel some distance for certain things if you are not near a larger city.
post #73 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post
Kansas is easy legally.

There are compulsory school attendance laws for kids between 7 and 18.
Kansas doesn't authorize homeschooling by state statute but recognizes non-accredited private schools- which is how homeschools are classified in KS.



Registration of your non-accredited private school is done once and is very simple. You don't even give your children's names. It can be done online.
I don't see any reason to not register.

There is no testing or monitoring.

http://www.ksde.org/Default.aspx?tabid=1684

Maybe not so friendly in terms of lower numbers of support groups and having to travel some distance for certain things if you are not near a larger city.

The main reason I decided NOT to register is that I don't think it's any buisiness of the state's that I am homeschooling. One day down the road they may decide to be more "pro-active" when it comes to homeschoolers or maybe thay will decide to levy a tax on homeschoolers, really who knows with the government. The point is I would not want to make it easy to be contacted by them in the event they decide what measures they may take. The less control they have the better. Frankly, I really don't want them in my private buisiness. This is one reason why I decided to homeschool in the first place.

Now don't get me wrong, I don't homeschool in secret. I tell anyone who wants to know what we're doing. I want to make sure that people also know that I have nothing to hide. I don't want to come across as "an end of the worlder" or anything. It's just that I am a firm believer that the less the gov't knows about our private home life the better off we are.

That being said, of course, I hope you understand this philosophy has nothing to do with taking children out of abusive homes or making sure a child is safe where they are living. I am only saying that I believe that the gov't should not have a voice in how parents choose to school their children.
post #74 of 105
We homeschooled in Oregon last year and it was wonderful! Many resources and classes, lots of homeschoolers all over...tons of groups and things to do.

We are homeschooling in RI this year. Lots of rules and I have to report any children age 6 and up. Must send in letter and attendance record, long list of "required" subjects to teach, plus each school district can make up their own rules and enforce them to local homeschoolers

A child may receive a “course of at-home instruction approved by school committee of the town wherein the child resides” if the following requirements are met:
a. the period of attendance is “substantially equal” to that of the public schools,
b. an attendance register is kept, and
c. the teaching in the required subjects listed above is “thorough and efficient


There a list of best and worst here. RI is one of the worst
post #75 of 105
I did not see MA mentioned at all. We are a Coast Guard family that is about to start HS. We will be moving every 2-4 years so state laws are going to be important to us. Glad to see so many HS friendly states.
post #76 of 105
alaska hands down and there are no laws to really stand in your way either! we just moved from there!
post #77 of 105
oh and alabama is easy too we're right on the border like 10 min away. all you have to do is establish a church school (even if you arent christian) you kind of just sign up through one in the state if you cant find one. it was easy. georgia was easy enough too.
post #78 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippiemommaof4 View Post
oh and alabama is easy too we're right on the border like 10 min away. all you have to do is establish a church school (even if you arent christian) you kind of just sign up through one in the state if you cant find one. it was easy. georgia was easy enough too.
Interesting. My family would like us to try and get stationed at Fort Rucker, AL, but I thought the homeschool law was ridiculous. Personally, I don't even understand how it's legal to require people sign up with a church school.
post #79 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphygt View Post
Interesting. My family would like us to try and get stationed at Fort Rucker, AL, but I thought the homeschool law was ridiculous. Personally, I don't even understand how it's legal to require people sign up with a church school.
Well its just part of it, you dont have to be a christian though they're just cover schools. I didnt think it was that big of a deal what they required. The cover/church school was basically easy once I figured out how to go about it. Other than that I didnt see anything to get in the way, I also joined a hs group for alabama to get questions answered. we ended up living on the georgia side and I had to submit an intent to homeschool paper which was easy, and I have to submit a monthly attendance paper to the local dod school district. The school district sent me everything in the mail and I sent it back ,easy enough for me.
post #80 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnakeWoman View Post
I live in SE PA, and I wouldn't trade it for homeschooling in many other places.

Homeschooling is practically mainstream here - the network of homeschoolers is huge and strong. Because of that, the resources are unbelievably rich, diverse, and even low-cost or free.

PA does have reporting requirements, so if you are looking to avoid reporting you might not enjoy PA. If reporting doesn't bother you, SE PA has proven to be a very rich homeschooling environment.
Oh my goodness I am on the other side of the state and I guess it is just the difference in where we are or something but oh my......I DON'T suggest anyone move to this part of the state when it comes to homeschooling.
This is going to be my first year homeschooling my boys and the school is already all over my butt....they want this that and the other and oh yeah by the way that doctor's signature isn't good enough go get another one and just all kinds of B.S.
The year hasn't even started yet and I already have a headache from the district :
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