or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Teachers not taking kids outside daily because it is too cold
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Teachers not taking kids outside daily because it is too cold - Page 2

post #21 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctdoula View Post
And about affording coats, etc. You can usually find them pretty inexpensively at Goodwill, Salvation Army, etc. Also, it's easy to layer. A shirt, sweater, hoodie and fleece will keep you just as warm as a shirt and coat. You can get mittens at the $1 store and most jackets/fleeces/hoodies have hoods if you don't have a hat.
You've obviously never shopped at thrift stores or $ stores in the south.
post #22 of 113
There seems to be a big issue here with people from cold climates thinking things are done the same in warm climates. It's just different. There are probably temps that you think are warm when every child in my dd's school is wearing pants and possibly light jackets. There are also probably temps that you think are far too hot for anyone to be out in that no one would think twice about having the kids out in. When your body and mind are used to one set of things as being normal it can be very hard to see that it's not normal to everyone. We live in a duplex that does not have a working heater. That seems perfectly reasonable considering where we live, but I am digging out space heaters for a couple nights this week when our lows will be around 50.
post #23 of 113
What we from cold climates can't understand is why a child can't have a coat and go outside. That's all. Fresh air is a necessity for children.

Jenn
post #24 of 113
I always feel too cold. : No matter what. And the teachers don't get to warm up by running around- they have to stand still to watch. Well, I have to run after the kids who have fallen, while the older teachers supervise holding their coffee thermoses. : But I do think kids need to run around a little bit. Maybe they can use the gym more for things like S.P.U.D., rope climbing and net climbing, etc, so they get their exercise even if it's cold.
post #25 of 113
Well the school here that my DD goes to (in NC, so "The South"). All the kids go out everyday regardless of the temperature. We actually went to visit the school last year to check it out on the coldest day of the year last year. I think it was a high of around 30 couple, no rain or snow, just cold. All the kids and teachers were out playing.

They do have lots of warnings to make sure to dress the kids for being outside, if it's cold, raining, etc. I don't see dressing for winter much different then dressing for rain. She needs boots, coat, hat for the rain, just warmer ones for the cold.

The littles ones at school (3 year olds) start the day outside. So it's usually way colder for them then other students. They play for about an hour first thing in the morning before heading in for inside play, and art and stuff.

Liam.
post #26 of 113
I think some research in to poverty levels in the south might be in order to understand how people might not be able to afford a coat. As I said before I have heard tons about winter clothing drives up north. In all my years living in LA and now FL I've never once heard of any programs to provide jackets or anything of the sort for children or adults. If you had to chose between keeping the power on and food on the table or a jacket that might be worn for a few weeks which would you pick?
post #27 of 113
As a teacher in the DC suburbs, I will tell you our district policy is if it is below freezing we don't go out. I love taking the kids out and I don't mind the cold (neither do my colleagues) but is a problem when kids are sent in with a light fleece coat and no gloves, no mittens, and no hat. Quite honestly, in my opinion, it isn't a teacher problem but an overall parent problem. We cannot take children out when most are not properly dressed.
post #28 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmeyrick View Post
Most districts have policies about going outside when it's cold. Also, if most kids show up without gloves and hats, then they can't go, so the whole class stays in. :
:

When I was in school, there were lots of times we didn't go out b/c of the cold. Especially if you are in a poorer district, many of the kids don't have the proper gear. They can get plenty of fresh air before and after school.
post #29 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabrog View Post
What we from cold climates can't understand is why a child can't have a coat and go outside. That's all. Fresh air is a necessity for children.

Jenn

As others have explained, poverty is rampant in much of the South. Why spend money on a coat that may or may not be needed at all when you know that food and ultilities will be needed regardless.

My kids have a variety of coats, including appropriate wear for very cold weather should it occur. Last winter, we had one ice storm where the schools were closed for a couple of days. Mine were able to get outside in appropriate coats, hats, mittens, etc because we can afford to buy these things.

The reality is, not everyone CAN afford to buy these things, *especially* considering these items may not be needed at all for the entire 'winter'. The coats and accessories that my kids wore last winter on the coldest days (10 days tops) easily cost us over $100 on sale at Costco. That's a lot of money for most families to put out for the few random days it's cold enough to warrant such coats.

As for layering, most people in the South simply do not own a lot of stuff like this. We manage just fine 95% of the time in jeans and long sleeve t-shirts with maybe a light jacket, if that. People just don't put a huge priority on buying a lot of true winter clothing for a handful of days each year.

Add in that most people in the South simply are not used to very cold temperatures.

Like someone else said, people from the north might be appalled at how hot it is here in the summer when that's just our reality. It's got a lot to do with what you're used to.

A funny aside...

My DS was born in Hawaii. When we moved back to TX, he was barely 3. We got off the plane and it was in the low 30's. He starts visibly shaking and says 'Mama, why is it so COLD in Texas?' He was ready to go back to Hawaii that morning. By noon, though, it was 60. Of course, he still thought that was frigid. It was just such a shock to his body.
post #30 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by s_kristina View Post
You've obviously never shopped at thrift stores or $ stores in the south.
Very true.

And even if there was an abundance of winter coats and such at thrift stores, the poorest of the poor STILL aren't going to spend what little money they have on something that may or may not be used AT ALL during the 'winter'. IF the stuff is used, it's for a VERY short amount of time, so it's just hard to justify spending much on it. I even have a hard time each year spending money on heavy coats knowing how unlikely it is that my kids will need them, and we have plenty of money to buy such things. It just seems so wasteful.
post #31 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyche View Post
You have obviously never moved from California to Michigan.
When I got into grad school at the University of Michigan I was sent a video put out by the school. In an attempt to describe their diversity they said something to the effect of: "At the U of M we have students from around the world. Including such exotic locations as Nigeria, China, Nepal, and California." :
post #32 of 113
If it is raining here or below freezing the kids play in the gym. I dont want my dd out in the rain or really cold weather because it agrivates her asthma. I dont have a problem at all with them not going outside as long as they do have somewere to go to play during the day.
post #33 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCatLvrMom2A&X View Post
If it is raining here or below freezing the kids play in the gym. I dont want my dd out in the rain or really cold weather because it agrivates her asthma.
Ah, that's a good point. At least a third of my school has asthma. I'll bet that's why we don't go outside very often in the winter at my school. When we do, at least one kid needs to use a pump.

How come our kids are so sickly these days? Diet? Pollution?
post #34 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabrog View Post
What we from cold climates can't understand is why a child can't have a coat and go outside. That's all. Fresh air is a necessity for children.

Jenn
I'm from a cold climate. Bitter cold, windy, and usually without the pleasure of snow. Eventually it got to a point where I didn't want to go outside as a child :.
post #35 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by wifeandmom View Post

As for layering, most people in the South simply do not own a lot of stuff like this. We manage just fine 95% of the time in jeans and long sleeve t-shirts with maybe a light jacket, if that. People just don't put a huge priority on buying a lot of true winter clothing for a handful of days each year.

Add in that most people in the South simply are not used to very cold temperatures.

I was : when the temps were still in the 80s until December. I thought I had it all figured out when I bought ds 6 long sleaved t-shirts and two short sleaved t-shirts it the larger size. Ds was growing out of his summer t-shirts and most of his winter ones were long-sleaved:.

The weather in South Central Texas is wacky. My first winter here I was anticipating and 80degree Christmas, instead there was rainy chilliness from October through February. Right now I layer long sleaved t-shirts, his summer windbreaker, and his light jacket but some days it is cold enough where I don't think I can dress him warmly enough to be outside. Usually, unless it is windy or drizzly I let him outside a bit.

My first summer here temps in the 90s up to 100 didn't bother me since I still remembered 125 in Saudi and living in an unairconditioned house in a state where the sun is out 23hrs a day in the summer.

Trying to predict what clothing your child will need in SCT is like playing the stockmarket
post #36 of 113
You know, there really should be plenty of time for outdoor play before and after school for those really concerned about it. While I agree that kids need outdoor time every day (whenever possible), and here in Maine our kids play outdoors at school unless it's below 10 degrees, if kids don't have jackets because they cannot afford them, they should stay inside. The whole class. It strikes me as discriminatory to force the coatless kids to stay in - they can't help that their family needs food more than a coat they might use a few times before outgrowing.

For us, coats and full cold weather snow gear is a necessity. As much as food, and it can be found inexpensively relative to the south!

To the OP, I would investigate the policy (and hopefully there is a policy and it's not up the the teacher's whim) and try to understand the reasons for it. That might help in terms of deciding how you want to deal with it. In my brief, limited school experience I have learned that I need to choose my battles with the system very carefully, and understanding the policy will help you decide whether this is a battle you choose to take on as your own!
post #37 of 113
I'm actually glad that my dd doesn't go outside much at her preschool during the winter. She is very sensitive to the cold, and genuinely doesn't enjoy playing outside when its snowy or wet. She loves it for about 5 minutes, and then her body temp drops so far she is shaking and shivering, and crying. Not fun.

The public schools here have a policy about how cold they will allow it to get and still go outside. Its probably a much lower temp than in the south since we live in Maine and routinely see below zero temps.

As long as they have another place to play, then I don't mind.
post #38 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by s_kristina View Post
I think some research in to poverty levels in the south might be in order to understand how people might not be able to afford a coat. As I said before I have heard tons about winter clothing drives up north. In all my years living in LA and now FL I've never once heard of any programs to provide jackets or anything of the sort for children or adults. If you had to chose between keeping the power on and food on the table or a jacket that might be worn for a few weeks which would you pick?
While I totally agree about there being very poor areas in the south, we are in a pretty darn affluent area for the most part. I would say that if not affording coats was an issue, it may only be for a child or two. There are also tons of places to get free coats for children in need. We live in a generous area.

I really think that in this case, it is an issue of teacher comfort and not the children's comfort level.
post #39 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyoftwo View Post
I really think that in this case, it is an issue of teacher comfort and not the children's comfort level.
This may be the case, but most teachers (including me) would rather freeze outside then keep 27 children inside all day. Everyone learns better after a quick run around.
post #40 of 113
Quote:
And the teachers don't get to warm up by running around- they have to stand still to watch.
The teachers on supervision do not stand still here. THey are walking around the entire schoolground. The entire school goes out at once.

The kids who don't bring appropriate clothing stay inside, but not the entire class.

Quote:
We manage just fine 95% of the time in jeans and long sleeve t-shirts with maybe a light jacket, if that. People just don't put a huge priority on buying a lot of true winter clothing for a handful of days each year.
At the temps the OP said a long sleeve shirt & a light jacket are all that are needed. they don't need full winter gear of a snowsuit, scarf, hat, winter mittens, etc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Learning at School
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Education › Learning at School › Teachers not taking kids outside daily because it is too cold