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Teachers not taking kids outside daily because it is too cold - Page 3

post #41 of 113
I know when we lived in San Antonio, people were putting on parkas and complaining it was too cold to go outside when it was SIXTY! We were the only ones at the playgrounds all winter long. When it was gorgeous. Yet we stayed inside all summer, because I thought it was too hot, when many other people were outside.

When I taught, it was always a really difficult call, because the kids needed to go outside, but if even one child did not have a coat, it was really tough to take them out. We didn't have anywhere to send them to be supervised. Plus I hated to single out a child and make him/ her feel badly. But on the other hand, I hated to keep the whole class inside.

We often couldn't use the gym, because when it was our recess time, other kids were using the gym for pe.

I'd like to see all kids going outside unless it is under about 10 or 15 degrees (depending on where you live. When we lived in South Dakota, people wore SHORTS when it was 10 degrees Fahrenheit).

I'd start by talking to the teacher and express your thoughts on the matter. She might be able to tell you that they can't do it bc of asthma or something. Or she might not dream that anyone would want their kids to go outside in cold weather. It's hard to tell.
post #42 of 113
Our high tomorrow is supposed to be around 60. My dd was having a talk with me this afternoon about needing to wear her jacket when she goes to lunch and specials. All the classrooms have exterior exits there are no hallways at her school. I can't imagine not wearing a jacket when it's 60 out I'd be : My 2 year old ds has a habit of opening the front door if it's not dead bolted. My dd was telling me I needed to get him quick this evening because he was headed to the door and would get out. I knew it was between 50-60 outside and he would slam the door shut the moment he opened it. His pronouncement on the weather was a scrunched up face and "cold, WEIRD!" On the other hand they both think I'm a horribly evil mom if I try to keep them inside when it's 100 out. It's really what your used to.
post #43 of 113
In total agreement that its a regional/cultural thing.

I grew up in Seattle and I remember my first grade teacher saying, "If we were in Phoenix this would be rain. We're not in Phoenix this is not rain", as she shooed us out the door to get some fresh air.
post #44 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyoftwo View Post
While I totally agree about there being very poor areas in the south, we are in a pretty darn affluent area for the most part. I would say that if not affording coats was an issue, it may only be for a child or two. There are also tons of places to get free coats for children in need. We live in a generous area.

I really think that in this case, it is an issue of teacher comfort and not the children's comfort level.

It could also be that there are a few students that do not have the appropriate clothing for playing outside in cold weather and maybe the teacher doesn't want to single them out by making them stay inside while the rest of the class plays outside.
post #45 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyche View Post
You have obviously never moved from California to Michigan.

ToMAYto, ToMAHto
Ha! I did mover from CA to MI. I was in grad school in CA after growing up in LA. And yes it was a huge change to go to MI. Cultural as well as weather-wise.
post #46 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieMF View Post

The kids who don't bring appropriate clothing stay inside, but not the entire class.
Who watches the children who stay inside?



Quote:
At the temps the OP said a long sleeve shirt & a light jacket are all that are needed. they don't need full winter gear of a snowsuit, scarf, hat, winter mittens, etc.
The temps mentioned in the OP were mid-30's. I can assure you that my children would be MISERABLE if I had them in a LS shirt and light jacket when it was that cold.

Mid-30's really IS cold for us southerners. We're not used to temps that those in the north are adjusted to.

I have a friend that lived in Ohio for 3 years. Totally adjusted to the freezing cold weather and would go for a morning walk when it was 10 degrees outside wearing her layered stuff.

Moved to Alabama. Spent the first summer there sweating her butt off. 'Winter' arrived. She could.not.believe. how cold she thought it was at only 40-50 degrees.

Back in Ohio, 40-50 degrees was NOTHING to her. But after only one summer of Alabama heat and adjusting to that climate, her perception of cold changed.

Now they are in Nebraska. She says it's worse there than it was in Ohio in terms of being cold.
post #47 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieMF View Post
At the temps the OP said a long sleeve shirt & a light jacket are all that are needed. they don't need full winter gear of a snowsuit, scarf, hat, winter mittens, etc.
When I lived in Anchorage, Alaska I would wear shorts to the gym when the temps were in the 30s. Right now, at 0822 in the morning, in San Antonio, Texas it is 31 degrees and I would not be leaving the house if I didn't have to go to the post office :.


...and I got rid of my parkas when I left Anchorage.
post #48 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieMF View Post


At the temps the OP said a long sleeve shirt & a light jacket are all that are needed. they don't need full winter gear of a snowsuit, scarf, hat, winter mittens, etc.

Ha ha, this made me laugh. It will be 50 degrees (obviously colder in the morning) today and I sent me kids with mittens, a hat and a heavy coat. You probably would consider this weather down right warm. It really is all just a matter of perception. :

I really don't think not owning warm coats is an issue in this case as I have seen the kids come into school well bundled up (I volunteer a lot). I definately understand that it is the case in many schools.

The asthma factor is one that I never even considered and makes a lot of sense.

Yes we do have a lot of time for outside play after school and we take advantage of it but I don't know if I would want to teach 20 first graders for seven hours with no outside time.

The gym is a great idea but it isn't available. Since all of the kids get gym twice a week (a great idea) the gym is never available for free time.

I don't mean to sound like I am complaining too much about the whole thing. I am really lucky. My kids go to an amazing public school with wonderful, caring teachers.
post #49 of 113
Coats and cultural aside, is it really a good thing to keep children inside for all that time? It would only take one teacher or parent to get up a coat drive-- not even heavy coats...just some layers. The kids could peel them off as they warmed up. Southern kids, statistically, have the highest rate of obesity. It would seem a coat drive would be a simple thing, and I can't beieve nobody ever thought of it. (Which I am sure is not true). Is keeping chubby kids inside and on Ritalin a better idea?

Get those kids outside. Even kids who have asthma should go outside. Old buildings are probably more dangerous than 40 degree temps. Kids with asthma go outside in the north.

My stepfather is from Arkansas and lived in TX most of his life; he's a tough cookie.

It seems so ...american...to sit inside instead of figuring out a way to get a sweater on a kid.
post #50 of 113
I remember visiting Dallas in December and the zoo was free because it was under 50F outside....
post #51 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
Coats and cultural aside, is it really a good thing to keep children inside for all that time?
No, it's not.

But don't underestimate the power of one loud, scary mother who thinks her precious children should never have to brave the cold.
:

"Oh, my precious cannot possibly go outside! It's forty-five degrees out! It's freezing! You have to keep him/her inside!" She proclaims. Then her head spins around and a rasping voice says, "Or else!!! Bwahahahahaha!" A few mothers like that can hold entire grade levels hostage.
post #52 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyche View Post
No, it's not.

But don't underestimate the power of one loud, scary mother who thinks her precious children should never have to brave the cold.
:

"Oh, my precious cannot possibly go outside! It's forty-five degrees out! It's freezing! You have to keep him/her inside!" She proclaims. Then her head spins around and a rasping voice says, "Or else!!! Bwahahahahaha!" A few mothers like that can hold entire grade levels hostage.
One loud mother is not as scary to me as whole schools of fat,sad, and ritalin-ladden kids.
post #53 of 113
This is post just makes me feel better and better about the school my DD goes to. They flat out tell everyone going to the school. "We are going outside, a lot of time is spent outside, dress your kids correctly for the weather." They go outside everyday. This week it's been pretty cold for here (NC), today the low was 28 and the high was around 43 I think. That's pretty cold for here, all the kids were out playing. That only thing they scaled back on was that the kids ate inside instead of outside like usually. They also eat inside if it rains.

Liam.
post #54 of 113
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post #55 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
One loud mother is not as scary to me as whole schools of fat,sad, and ritalin-ladden kids.

You're probably right.

20 minutes of fresh air would likely cure all of that and solve world hunger too.

I think this thread has gotten a bit dramatic to say the least.
post #56 of 113
I haven't read all the replies, so I am hoping a fellow Alaskan has already piped in, but just in case - kids at public schools here go outside for recess until 20 below zero. After that the kids have to walk the building or the gym inside several times for recess time so they are burning off some energy. Sounds to me like it's too cold for the teachers - get them some Carhartts!
post #57 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by HobbitMomma View Post
Sounds to me like it's too cold for the teachers - get them some Carhartts!
I'm in Dallas, and I can assure you - we don't have Carhartts here. Sometimes our winters are so mild you don't even need a warm coat. It does get fairly cold here in the mornings (in the teens, very occasionally into the single digits) and so most schools set a rule like as long as it's over freezing, they will go outside, otherwise they do an alternate activity indoors.

Honestly when it is cold here it sucks. It is usually wet and windy as well, making it impossible to go outside anyway due to mud. We don't get snow here really, so you are just outside playing in the freezing cold.

My husband is from Iran, and would die repeatedly if he knew they were taking DS outside at school in cold weather. There is a national obsession in Iran with cold and staying warm all the time. So my DH would definitely be one of those parents screaming about his kid to the school.
post #58 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by wifeandmom View Post
You're probably right.

20 minutes of fresh air would likely cure all of that and solve world hunger too.

I think this thread has gotten a bit dramatic to say the least.
I think the whole situation of so many drugged kids not getting physical activity during an entire school day *is* pretty dramatic.

What's our child Ritalin rate? What is our childhood Diabetes rate? Oh, I don't know...say compared to some other cold place...like Norway? Where all the children are beautiful and above average. And tall. :
post #59 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisac77 View Post
I'm in Dallas, and I can assure you - we don't have Carhartts here. Sometimes our winters are so mild you don't even need a warm coat. It does get fairly cold here in the mornings (in the teens, very occasionally into the single digits) and so most schools set a rule like as long as it's over freezing, they will go outside, otherwise they do an alternate activity indoors.

Honestly when it is cold here it sucks. It is usually wet and windy as well, making it impossible to go outside anyway due to mud. We don't get snow here really, so you are just outside playing in the freezing cold.

My husband is from Iran, and would die repeatedly if he knew they were taking DS outside at school in cold weather. There is a national obsession in Iran with cold and staying warm all the time. So my DH would definitely be one of those parents screaming about his kid to the school.
So would a reality check about weather and culture be totally offensive? Or oculd your kid and the other cold children stay in with a para while the other children went out. Oh, I know there is no money for paras...but isn't it emotionally and physically costly to keep all those other children in? Why should my kid stay in because yours can't go out? I think it's unhealthy not to go out. So what do we do now? You want yours in, I want mine out. IS there a solution? Although, if we are only talking about keeping them in on the occassional freezxing cold day in TX, I *might* be ok. But 40's? No.

Kids need to move. Expecially since places like TX and FL and VA get swletering in summer and the children can't go out there then, either. I mean, where does it end? Sensibility has to come into play at some point. Or maybe it doesn't. Let's not think of ways to get these children outside for some air, lets just keep them inside a building all day. Does that honestly make any sense whatsoever?

We can put soda machines in every school, but we can't get kids outside?
post #60 of 113
Quote:
This is post just makes me feel better and better about the school my DD goes to. They flat out tell everyone going to the school. "We are going outside, a lot of time is spent outside, dress your kids correctly for the weather."
Yeah that.

I live in northern Ontario - and it gets damn cold here.

I think if it's colder than -30*C the kids stay in. Otherwise - hope you brought your toque and mitts! Obviously this is not down south, and kids might not be dressed appropriately for colder weather.

I know for a fact though, having been in classrooms - that free time or no, outside time is essential to most kids to run off steam.
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