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New Compacting Thread - Page 4

post #61 of 99
When I was in college I could buy almost all textbooks used. Even the campus book store sold used books. The only time I couldn't was if the it was a new edition or a new class or something.
post #62 of 99
Thread Starter 
Half.com has a good selection of textbooks and I second looking for them used on campus. I only bought new when I had to.
post #63 of 99
This sounds great and close to what dh and I try to abide by. I'll be checking out the old threads to get a better idea of everything.
post #64 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumkenna&lucas View Post
So I have been thinking this over and 2 things I have ?s about textbooks..I need textbooks in January. My only idea is to shop maybe Amazon and buy them used?? Makeup. Yes I am a makeup addict although I do have mineral makeup I think I will need to replace 1 thing during the 3 months. Should I just buy it now or is that cheating
Check out http://www.swaptree.com/WebFrmAboutUs.aspx
I haven't signed in yet to see if it's really active or useful, but it's worth a try. It was started by a Compacter last year.
post #65 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by swellmomma View Post
raw materials don't count in this do they? For example, I plan on building 2 different playstands for my kids in the new year, I would have to buy the wood and hardware to do so, that's still "ok" isn't it?
Is there a Habitat for Humanity store in your area? You could also ask for scraps if there is any new construction in your area. That's what I'm planning to do to build more raised beds for veggie gardening.
post #66 of 99
I started out compacting last year then fell off the wagon when I went to stay with my mom in our small town in TX and started working at Wal-Mart.

I'm still working at Wal-Mart.

But, I think I'm going to give compacting another try. I will have exceptions:

1. Handmade and secondhand okay
2. Educational items for DD (we homeschool) which I can't find secondhand and can't resource from the library.
3. Fabric. Though I will give preference to shopping at SAS which sells factory ends/overstock over shopping at Jo-Ann's. And I'm going to keep trying to actually use fabric I already have before looking for new.
post #67 of 99
I am so excited about compacting. Basically I am beginning right now. I have made my last trip to get last minute X-mas gifts and I feel so free to just be able to sit back and enjoy the time I am going to spend with my family.

I am begining to brainstorm some things that I want to have at home and I was wondering if any of you compacters have any ideas of how to make them myself. I want a new clothesline. I would prefer a retractable one. Any ideas?

I really appreciate the person that started this thread. I know we are going to support each other through this exciting time.

Elizabeth
post #68 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedAnt View Post
Is there a Habitat for Humanity store in your area? You could also ask for scraps if there is any new construction in your area. That's what I'm planning to do to build more raised beds for veggie gardening.

there is! I completely forgot about it, as I have never been in there. I will check them out for sure. I was planning at one time to go there to look for a chandelier light fixture for dd's room.
post #69 of 99
My big debate is what to do about my 99 Kia. I bought it about a year ago for $1600. I've fixed a radiator leak, belts, and the front brakes. Now it needs a new (used) transmission, to the tune of $1500. DH thinks we should just get me a new car. I don't think we can afford a good one, this one fixed at least I know what its faults are, etc. Our other car is an 87 mitsubishi galant, in very good condition with less than half the miles on it but man, it guzzles gas!

So, the question is do I want to try to take it and trade it in for...I don't know, something used but reliable, probably. I doubt we'd qualify for a loan for a new car and I don't want to take on that sort of debt load right now, anyway. But $1500 is nearly as much as I paid for the darn car in the first place, and it's got really high miles...
post #70 of 99
I am taking a little inventory of things that I was planning on purchasing with in the next few months, and I realized that out of the 10 or more things that I wanted, all I really need is some new underwear and the mama pads from a co-op that I am in. Other than that I think I can do without! :it is almost peaceful to come to a realization that I really don't need all that stuff!
post #71 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by epdeans View Post
I am begining to brainstorm some things that I want to have at home and I was wondering if any of you compacters have any ideas of how to make them myself. I want a new clothesline. I would prefer a retractable one. Any ideas?
I've been thinking about this too. I think I'll just take 2 wood scraps or small branches, drill holes evenly spaced on each, knot & thread a piece of rope back and forth, then knot again. I would hang each piece of wood on hooks across from each other. It's not retractable in the spring kind of way, but you could unhook one side and roll it up to hang with the other when not in use. Hopefully that makes a little sense.
post #72 of 99
I love this idea. I just moved back to the U.S. from Africa, where we lived a very simple life. It was difficult and expensive to buy things in Africa, and many didn't even exist/ were outlawed, such as plastic bags. It is amazing how people can make do when they have to. We threw almost nothing away. We kept and reused everything, not on principle, but as a matter of necessity. Everything was precious. The irony is I don't think most of my African friends would ever be able to wrap their minds around decluttering, because they would never have enough stuff to need to get rid of it. Anything they might not want would surely be a very precious gift to a friend or family member. Most of our neighbors had next to nothing in their homes. They bought all their clothing in used clothing markets and even that did not feel cheap to them (most people had 3-7 outfits at most that they handwashed constantly). Most people do not have running water, electricity, ovens, refrigerators. For most people buying something new in a store, or even food in a package is almost unthinkable.

It is weird to be back here. We sold everything before we left, and now as we are rebuilding our life here, I feel a need to buy lots of things (containers for food storage, towels, socks, underwear, bras, baskets for storage, potholders, picture frames, etc.). Its adding up. I got myself a Costco membership, and have made more trips to target than I want to think-- I'm embarassed to admit. In Africa, my sons got used to having very few things, and their play was so much more creative... Now they are in school and my 6-year-old always wants the things his friends are talking about (transformers, etc.). I feel we are being sucked into consumerism.

I am really glad to find this idea. Maybe it will help me to find a way to bring the way of living I learned in Africa to our life here. It seemed almost impossible to me yesterday, but reading this thread gives me hope. Thank you.
post #73 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by harmonymama View Post
I love this idea. I just moved back to the U.S. from Africa, where we lived a very simple life. It was difficult and expensive to buy things in Africa, and many didn't even exist/ were outlawed, such as plastic bags. It is amazing how people can make do when they have to. We threw almost nothing away. We kept and reused everything, not on principle, but as a matter of necessity. Everything was precious. The irony is I don't think most of my African friends would ever be able to wrap their minds around decluttering, because they would never have enough stuff to need to get rid of it. Anything they might not want would surely be a very precious gift to a friend or family member. Most of our neighbors had next to nothing in their homes. They bought all their clothing in used clothing markets and even that did not feel cheap to them (most people had 3-7 outfits at most that they handwashed constantly). Most people do not have running water, electricity, ovens, refrigerators. For most people buying something new in a store, or even food in a package is almost unthinkable.

It is weird to be back here. We sold everything before we left, and now as we are rebuilding our life here, I feel a need to buy lots of things (containers for food storage, towels, socks, underwear, bras, baskets for storage, potholders, picture frames, etc.). Its adding up. I got myself a Costco membership, and have made more trips to target than I want to think-- I'm embarassed to admit. In Africa, my sons got used to having very few things, and their play was so much more creative... Now they are in school and my 6-year-old always wants the things his friends are talking about (transformers, etc.). I feel we are being sucked into consumerism.

I am really glad to find this idea. Maybe it will help me to find a way to bring the way of living I learned in Africa to our life here. It seemed almost impossible to me yesterday, but reading this thread gives me hope. Thank you.
How awesome! I did a study abroad in East Africa and have always wanted to live there. I loved the simplicity!
post #74 of 99
Oh I am in for January. I'll try babysteps. I think the hardest will be to convince dh, but maybe I should focus more on my own actions and hope he will follow suit
post #75 of 99
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by harmonymama View Post
I love this idea. I just moved back to the U.S. from Africa, where we lived a very simple life. It was difficult and expensive to buy things in Africa, and many didn't even exist/ were outlawed, such as plastic bags. It is amazing how people can make do when they have to. We threw almost nothing away. We kept and reused everything, not on principle, but as a matter of necessity. Everything was precious. The irony is I don't think most of my African friends would ever be able to wrap their minds around decluttering, because they would never have enough stuff to need to get rid of it. Anything they might not want would surely be a very precious gift to a friend or family member. Most of our neighbors had next to nothing in their homes. They bought all their clothing in used clothing markets and even that did not feel cheap to them (most people had 3-7 outfits at most that they handwashed constantly). Most people do not have running water, electricity, ovens, refrigerators. For most people buying something new in a store, or even food in a package is almost unthinkable.

It is weird to be back here. We sold everything before we left, and now as we are rebuilding our life here, I feel a need to buy lots of things (containers for food storage, towels, socks, underwear, bras, baskets for storage, potholders, picture frames, etc.). Its adding up. I got myself a Costco membership, and have made more trips to target than I want to think-- I'm embarassed to admit. In Africa, my sons got used to having very few things, and their play was so much more creative... Now they are in school and my 6-year-old always wants the things his friends are talking about (transformers, etc.). I feel we are being sucked into consumerism.

I am really glad to find this idea. Maybe it will help me to find a way to bring the way of living I learned in Africa to our life here. It seemed almost impossible to me yesterday, but reading this thread gives me hope. Thank you.
It is really amazing what I take for granted. Your post reminded me of Material World, which was recommended by Delight in an older compacting thread. The book shows the contents of houses of people all over the world all on their front lawns. It is crazy how much more stuff people in the US have.
Did everyone survive the holidays? We ended up celebrating christmas 6 times with family and only one get together didn't focus on the presents. I'm also a part of the 2008 thread and I will easily have a few bags of things to add to my total.
post #76 of 99
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlingWearin'Mama View Post
Oh I am in for January. I'll try babysteps. I think the hardest will be to convince dh, but maybe I should focus more on my own actions and hope he will follow suit
post #77 of 99
I'm totally intrigued now. Am subbing and taking this one day at a time.
Jill, if you see this, I'd love to know about anything locally that works well for you.
post #78 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlingWearin'Mama View Post
Oh I am in for January. I'll try babysteps. I think the hardest will be to convince dh, but maybe I should focus more on my own actions and hope he will follow suit
That is what I am going to do..I do most of the purchasing for the family anyway so I am hoping it won't be too hard for dh to follow along..
post #79 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumkenna&lucas View Post
That is what I am going to do..I do most of the purchasing for the family anyway so I am hoping it won't be too hard for dh to follow along..
I'm wondering if dh will even notice my attempt at changing the way we purchase things! He doesn't shop at all...
post #80 of 99
Im trying to come up with a way to store my recycle stuff. We don't have curb side pick up so I go to a center once a week (Friday or Saturday) to drop it all off.
We live in a tiny apartment and right now im using paper bags to hold it all. They are just sitting there in my kitchen, out in the open, heaping. They are in the only place I can put them.
I was thinking of getting something like this
http://www.amazon.com/Richell-USA-Bi...8856936&sr=8-2
but being super frugal and a compacter, I can't fathom making this purchase. Theres got to be a better way.
I've been looking through thrift stores and such and haven't found anything yet. Im keeping my eyes open on craigs list too.
What would you all do?
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