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Pumping and working...oh my...Questions Answered Sticky - Page 3

post #41 of 58
I was reading this thread and because I am just starting my second week back at work, I had to put my two cents worth in.

I am pumping now and I pumped religiously with my DD until she turned 1 year. I just pumped when she/he would/will be eating and if I felt overly full. To be honest, I didn't start a stash this time until DS was 10 weeks old (I came back to work at 12 weeks).

I read that a couple people had to supplement with formula and there is nothing wrong with that but if your consistant and you make sure that LO exclusively nurses when your home, its a very good chance that your supply will be fine and you will be able to keep up with they are eating away from you.

My job tends to be crazy schedule wise some days and there were days that I didn't get to pump until I thought I would burst and it didn't mess anything up with my supply.

You'll be fine, the only 2 things you really need to do this are:
1. Confidence that you can
2. Support from your partner (this really helps through the hard times and doubt).

Good luck and Congrats on the new baby!!
post #42 of 58
This thread has saved my sanity tonight. I came home crying with frustration. My son's well-meaning caretaker insisted that he needed 5-6oz per bottle and that he was still hungry. After reading all this and checking out kellymom, I now know that he is doing fine with the 4oz per bottle I gave him and that I can actually keep up with pumping! He was so full he skipped a nursing session tonight, that's never happened before.

Thank you all so much for all the advice.
post #43 of 58
I didn't get a chance to read through every post so please forgive me if I'm repeating anything. I was a super pumper for my DS's first year. Here's my 2 cents:

1) What are the best bottles to get to avoid nipple confusion?

I used the Playtex NaturaLatch bottles with the Drop-Ins. We never had an issue with nipple confusion.

2) Is it possible to get a good freezer stash going before returning to work (since it's so early) when should I start pumping?
I started pumping when DS was a few weeks old. I'd do it after first morning feed and after last night feed just to get a stash going. I tried to do the pump one side while nursing thing - totally didn't work for me!

We introduced a bottle at about 4-5 weeks and he had a few ounces via bottle from dad every couple days just to make sure that he would take a bottle when he went to daycare. Never had a problem...

3) How much milk can I expect to pump in a day at work (I will be pumping at least three times during my shift, possibly four)?
In an 8 hour shift I pumped 3x. I was lucky and could pump for 30 minutes at a time. Over time I was able to yield 5-8 oz. total per session so 15-24oz./day. It just depended on the day. (As DS got older and started having longer stretches of sleep at night, I'd pump one time before I went to bed just to get a little extra milk in the freezer.)

Do whatever you can to be distracted while pumping. Watching those bottles to see what you're getting is a killer. It'll make you totally insane.

Pumping this much can make for sore nips. Some smart person told me to use olive oil to lube the flanges when I set up. Just put a bit of oil on the tip of your finger and then sweep it around the tube so that when the suction turns on there's less friction on the nipple. This was a LIFE SAVER!

Also, being able to pump hands-free meant that I could work and pump at the same time! I loved the Easy Expressions Hands Free Bustier. It saved my bacon! I could type and work away and pump. I was more productive which was good for my work and good for my psyche so I wasn't watching those bottles!

To store milk during work - I pumped into the Medela collection bottles each day at work. I brought 6 bottles to work and put the milk into our office fridge after pumping. If people at work are sketched out by milk (dumb but it happens), just put them in a little lunch sack in the fridge.

When I got home, I transferred the milk into Gerber Seal & Go Bags in 2 oz. portions. Since this is "liquid gold", I would much prefer to defrost more than have to throw it out! When DS got to be 12 weeks or so, I started freezing in 4 oz. increments.

Word to the wise, freeze them FLAT in the freezer, they'll stack much better than if you freeze them standing up which makes them all weird sizes. Also, label them because you'll want to work through your stash from oldest to newest.

4) How much milk does an infant of 6wks need to sustain them for an entire day?
It really depends on the baby. My DS generally took 12-16 oz. during the day. He was not a huge eater at daycare but would nurse quite a bit in the AM and in the evenings. (He did not fully reverse cycle though, he did continue to sleep longer stretches at night.)

Rather than try to figure out how much milk to bring to daycare each day, I would just bring her a stock of those 2-4oz bags and she'd use them as needed for feedings and then tell me when she was down to the last few and I'd bring more. (Be sure your daycare doesn't microwave the milk. It ruins all the good stuff in the EBM and it can make hot spots that could burn the baby's mouth. All that have to do is soak the Gerber bag in a warm water bath and then pour it into the bottle when its thawed. Only takes a few minutes.)

I quit pumping when DS was 1 year old and when I quite I had something like 1000 oz. in the freezer (told you I was a pumping queen!) Thus, even though I was not pumping anymore but was nursing when with him, he still had EBM at daycare for a long long time! In fact, DS is now 3 1/2 and I just foudn a couple of abandoned bags that somehow got lost at the back of the freezer and had to be thrown out. It was kind of bitter sweet remembering those crazy pumping days.

KellyMom.com is a great website and has a ton of awesome info on pumping and milk storage and reheating and all kinds of good stuff. Definitely surf around on there some!


HTH. Good luck. You'll do great!
post #44 of 58
I'd like to recommend the Medela Soft Cup which isn't a plastic nipple for babe to suck on but a cup type flow, we sell them at LLL and they are very popular with our working moms. Also a quick phone call to listen to your babe - even if it is just breathing can start a letdown very easily and help with pumping. http://www.medelabreastfeedingus.com.../84/softfeeder
this really is great and if anyone is confronted with nipple confusion - yes it does happen, even to babies worth their salt - or someone just doesn't want to give their baby a imitation nipple I would recommend this 100%
post #45 of 58

Supply Tips - originally posted in BF'ing Challenges Sticky

If any of the links aren't working try searching the article title and source (e.g.: Fenugreek Kellymom) using a metasearch engine like Dogpile or Surfwax, or please feel free to PM me.

AF - SUPPLEMENT RECOMMENDATION
I have heard that supplementing with Calcium/Magnesium may help with AF related supply issues. Here is a Kellymom link for various “Natural Treatments” Jump to the section titled, “Low milk supply associated with menstruation: Calcium/magnesium supplement”.
http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/natural-treatments.html

REVERSE CYCLING
If it is consistent with your sleep needs and parenting philosophy you might want to consider co-sleeping and keeping the self-serve Milk Bar open all night to encourage reverse cycling. The more milk your baby gets overnight the less he should need during the day. If safety is a concern check out Kellymom and look up the family bed. They give lots of safety tips.

BOTTLE FEEDING TIPS
Are you using slow flow nipples? If not, you might want to pick some up to try and slow down his bottle feedings and give him a chance to recognize that he is full. That may minimize the pressure on you to produce more milk than you should have to. Here is a link to a Kellymom article on how to bottlefeed breastfed babies. One of the best tips is to remove the bottle every couple of swallows to slow the feeding down. Of course this requires more effort on the part of the caregiver. http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bottle-feeding.html

SUPPLY BOOSTING TIPS
Again, start with the basics, make sure you eat enough protein, drink enough water and limit your caffeine and get enough rest (good luck with the last one). Regarding supplements, consider trying herbal combinations such as "More Milk" or "Rescue Remedy" or have you considered "Mother's Milk Tea?

Or you could try some of the various herbs by themselves: Fenugreek, Red Raspberry Leaf, Nettle, Alfalfa, Etc. (check Kellymom.com for a more complete list and info on dosages).

It is important to do your own research on each of these herbs and decide whether you are comfortable with them or not. I don’t remember much research regarding Alfalfa however, I stopped taking it when I learned it is not recommended for anyone with Lupus. I don't have Lupus and neither does DD but Lupus runs in my husband's family and I don't want to pre-dispose my daughter.

Something else to keep in mind, if I remember correctly Fenugreek is in the peanut family so you may want to avoid that particular herb if you have a history of peanut allergies in your family.

Regarding oatmeal (cereal, cookies, etc.), I have always eaten a lot and couldn't say whether it ever made any difference. You could also try Oatstraw Tea. If you are take oatmeal to help boost supply keep in mind it can be filling so don't let it replace your protein/fat. For instance, you wouldn't want to trade your egg and cheese breakfast sandwich for a bowl of oatmeal. Or if you have the oatmeal add plenty of walnuts &/or peanut butter.

Also, some women seem to respond well to a nice piece of steak. Oddly enough, the steak would seem to work occasionally, but not always, for me.

I have also heard that the milk boosters oatmeal and brewer's yeast have two components in common, Inositol and Choline. Inositol is a B vitamin (It may or may not be unofficially "numbered" B8). Supposedly Inositol and Choline work together to increase the effectiveness of Oxytocin. If you are curious --or for the benefit of anyone else thinking about trying this-- I tried a regimen of 400 - 500 mgs of Inositol and 2.5 grams of Choline.

The first time I tried this regimen I didn’t really stick with it long enough to see if it made any real difference but my impression was that the tea regimen of RRL, Nettle, & Oatstraw worked better for me. I tried the Inositol / Choline regimen again recently and saw a pretty dramatic increase, anywhere from a 50% to 100% increase after about a week to a week and a half. However, it seemed to make me dizzy. The dizziness went away about two days or so after discontinuing the Inositol and Choline regimen. If I were desperate I might try it again on a very reduced dose, which would mean cutting the tablets.


What is a galactagogue? Do I need one?...Herbal remedies for increasing milk
http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...actagogue.html

Increasing Low Milk Supply
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/low-supply.html

Let-down Reflex: Too slow?
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html

Marmet Technique
http://www.lactationinstitute.org/MANUALEX.html

I'm not pumping enough milk. What can I do? http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html

Choosing a Correctly-Fitted Breastshield http://www.medela.com/NewFiles/faq/b...hield_fit.html

How to bottle-feed the breastfed baby
...tips for a breastfeeding supportive style of bottle feeding http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bottle-feeding.html

Co-Sleeping – Making it Work and Making it Safe http://www.kellymom.com/pantley/pantley21.html

What is a galactagogue? Do I need one?...Herbal remedies for increasing milk
http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...actagogue.html

Fenugreek See For Increasing Milk Supply
http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...fenugreek.html

Increasing Low Milk Supply
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/low-supply.html

Choosing a Correctly-Fitted Breastshield http://www.medela.com/NewFiles/faq/b...hield_fit.html

How to bottle-feed the breastfed baby
...tips for a breastfeeding supportive style of bottle feeding http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bottle-feeding.html

Co-Sleeping – Making it Work and Making it Safe http://www.kellymom.com/pantley/pantley21.html

~Cath
post #46 of 58

Pumping and Workplace routine - originally posted in BF'ing Challenges sticky

If any of the links aren't working try searching the article title and source (e.g.: Fenugreek Kellymom) using a metasearch engine like Dogpile or Surfwax, or please feel free to PM me.

PUMPING TIPS
Make sure to read the Marmet (massage) technique to improve your pumping yield http://www.lactationinstitute.org/manualex.html

I recently read that the ducts extend up to the armpits so you might want to modify the technique to include this area. On a message board I once read about an enhancement technique, I haven't seen it anywhere else since then but it does make a difference for me.

Move the horns a little off center in between massaging, in a pattern, (e.g. slightly up, slightly down, slightly right, slightly left) so that the suction is reaching ducts it might not otherwise reach. Try to follow the same pattern each time so you're less likely to skip an area. This increased the amount of "hind" milk I was able to pump, which has a higher ratio of fat and protein so it is probably more filling. Once I go through the first pattern (12:00, 3:00, 6:00, and 9:00) I run through a second pattern (halfway between 12:00 and 3:00, halfway between 3:00 and 6:00, etc.) I was really surprised at how well this worked for me. As much as I would rather just sit down and let the pump do the work it is much more of a "hands on" experience than I would like; but it does work.

If you are coordinated try experimenting with compressions and/or massage while you are pumping. This might save some time on doing that in between moving the horns around.

Also, if you’re blanched (white) after pumping you may need bigger horns (aka funnels, shields, etc.). Note that it is possible to have large nipples even if your overall size seems small(er). One of the Medela web pages used to have a picture of what it looks like if you are getting squished. But that page has changed yet again and I can't find it.

If anyone here finds it please let me know and I will edit this post to update the defunct address below.

Medela - Choosing a Correctly Fitted Shield
http://www.medela.com/NewFiles/faq/b...hield_fit.html
See the fhird paragraph for a picture with a link to a video

Finally, here are a couple of miscellaneous tips I read recently that I’ve never tried myself but may be helpful: 1) a hot shower between your shoulder blades before pumping. 2) non-alcoholic beer, and 3) smelling your baby’s head, looking at her picture (to facilitate Visualization), etc.

When my supply issues were the worst, I would nurse on one side and pump on the other before going to work. This has a couple of advantages: 1) Your Prolactin levels are probably higher, 2) You pump more efficiently this way if you are more conditioned to the baby than you are the pump , and 3) You may be squeezing in half a pumping that you otherwise wouldn't be able to.

Also, give some consideration to additional "conservation" methods besides those tips on bottlefeeding a BF baby. E.g.: storing milk in "serving sizes" to avoid waste if the caregiver isn't cautious about pouring out only what is needed. This is especially important for the milk that gets frozen because you only have 24 hours to use it once it's thawed. Try storing half portions for the same reason. If baby is extra hungry the caregiver won't always have to waste a whole frozen bag if only half a bag is necessary. Note, the serving size will probably change over time.

Depending upon your pumping routine you may be able to tell when you are pumping fore milk versus hind milk or a combination of the two. The hind milk usually comes in towards the end of a feeding/pumping it is higher in fat and protein and it looks more like whole milk. That milk tends to be more filling so you might want to put a little less of that in a serving size, and vice versa. So I mark the bag accordingly. As an added bonus, when DD2 was younger DH would notice she'd fall asleep more easily after a serving of hind milk which is nice for the caregiver when it comes time to planning a nap.

OVERVIEW OF MY WORKING & PUMPING ROUTINE
Depending upon the setup you have at work some parts of my routine might not work for you, but I hope you'll find some of this helpful. Sorry it's so long.

Although the milk will stay fresh for up to 8 or so hours at room temperature, I prefer to keep it cold so that I don't cut too much into that 8 hours. That way the caregiver can use that time if necessary to decrease the potential amount of waste. So if they give DD2 a 3 ounce bottle but she only drinks 1 or 2 ounces that milk can actually sit out for quite awhile.

Also, refrigerating it (or keeping it on ice) at work gives you a greater margin for error if you forget about the milk when you get home. I have left my milk on ice overnight a couple of times and still felt comfortable going on to store and use it (based on the temperature of the milk when I discovered it I was well within the temperature guidelines for refrigeration storage). Check Kellymom http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/milkstorage.html or Medela's site for the temperature guidelines. I use a digital meat thermometer for checking the milk temp when necessary. If you have more than one bag you don't even need to open one. Just put the bags in a cup or mug and then place the digital probe between the bags.

So here is my procedure. I have a rectangular Rubbermaid storage container large enough to contain my fully assembled bottles (roughly 11" x 8" x 3"). Because it is a casserole dish you would need a fridge door shelf deep enough to hold it standing up. For transportation and camouflage purposes I have it double bagged in a larger than average and thicker than average grocery type plastic bag. As you may remember, my pocketbook is large enough to hold this container so I keep the bagged container in my pocketbook on my way too and from work. Otherwise you might need a large zippered tote bag or something similar.

So, at the end of a pumping session I lay the double zipped milk bags side by side at the bottom of the Rubbermaid container, then I lay the fully assemble bottles on top of them with the bottles side by side. Depending upon the width of the container you might need to set one of the bottles so the bottom of its horn will nest on the top of the other bottle. Then I put the lid on it, bag it, loosely tie the handles without knotting them, and place it in the door of the fridge, standing straight up. If the door shelf isn't deep enough on your fridge then you might be able to use a tall "canister" type Rubbermaid container but it would probably need to go on the top shelf.

This method also gives you the flexibility of leaving the bottles partially full until the next pumping. Then you can bag the milk when the bottles are full.

Regarding washing. I am lucky to have a kitchenette near the mother's room but I'm still pretty careful about where I put the disassembled parts. So the Rubbermaid container doubles as a tray and wash tub. I use Dawn detergent and hot water to wash/rinse the lid, which then doubles as a tray. I then wash/rinse the disassembled parts and lay them all on the lid. Then I wash/rinse the tub, transfer the clean parts into the tub and close the container.

It is important to shake as much water off of the parts as possible before putting them in the container. I transport everything home and take the lid off so everything can dry thoroughly. The only thing I need to do is make sure that the parts are spaced for air flow, especially the small silicone parts. In the morning they are fully dry. All I have to do is wash and dry my hands, and assemble the bottles, and I'm ready to start again.

With DD1 they had Palmolive in the kitchenette at work but the Dawn they now have is much better at cutting the fat so everything rinses better. Before I had to use a paper towel to give the insides of the bottles a light scrub and I would actually thread the paper towel through the narrow opening of the flange. Now I just wash and rinse in really warm, almost hot water. Vinegar is also really good for cutting fat, either during the washing process or as part of the final rinse.

Of course you have the option of simply reassembling the bottles after the milk is poured out, putting them back in the container and washing them when you get home. I do this on occasion but I still use the Rubbermaid container to hold everything as it dries overnight.

I use the thermal storage bag that comes with the Medela PIS to take the milk home. I now use 2 packs of "blue ice" to increase the longevity of the milk and margin of error in case I forget to take the milk out when I get home. As mentioned above, I have been able to use milk left overnight with one blue ice pack but when you use two the ice remains partially frozen so I'm assuming the milk would stay even colder.

If you are short on freezer compartment space: I cut a cardboard box to fit the Lansinoh storage bags that I use. That way I can stack the filled bags and freeze them flat with a minimum of distortion, on the bottom shelf (drawer). Once they are fully frozen, I use tissue boxes to "file" them on their sides them by date. Periodically I double check to make sure that they are in the correct chronological order.

The "stack, freeze flat and file" method saves on freezer space and keeps everything better organized so it is easier to find the oldest bag in the right size. And since you are not pawing through a pile of lumpy bags they are less likely to get ripped or torn. This happened to me a couple of times when I would freeze them standing up in cups. When rummaging through them they would bang against the coated wire of the drawer and the bags would get damaged. I lost a small but significant amount of milk this way. It's also easier to tell at a glance how much milk you have.

I have seen a storage / filing system you can buy but it is much bulkier since the drawer segments have to be large enough to fit a full bag before the milk has frozen. My method takes a little more effort since you have to stack and freeze the bags flat, and then file them, but there is a minimum of wasted space.


LINKS
Getting Started BF’ing
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/index.html

Storage & Handling http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/milkstorage.html

Index of Dr. Jack Newman’s Articles -- includes links to videos showing proper tips and techniques for proper latching
http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/newman.shtml

Newman’s latching tips, including diagrams
http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/whenlatchingpdf.pdf

What is a galactagogue? Do I need one?...Herbal remedies for increasing milk
http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...actagogue.html

Increasing Low Milk Supply
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/low-supply.html

Let-down Reflex: Too slow?
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html

Marmet Technique
http://www.lactationinstitute.org/manualex.html

Choosing a Correctly-Fitted Shield http://www.medela.com/NewFiles/faq/b...hield_fit.html

How to bottle-feed the BF baby
...tips for a breastfeeding supportive style of bottle feeding http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bottle-feeding.html

Co-Sleeping – Making it Work and Making it Safe http://www.kellymom.com/pantley/pantley21.html
BF’ing @ kellymom.com
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/index.html

How much expressed milk will my baby need? http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/milkcalc.html

Kellymom link: Herbal Remedies for Increasing Milk Supply
http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...bal-rem_a.html
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by charitycase20 View Post
I read that a couple people had to supplement with formula and there is nothing wrong with that but if your consistant and you make sure that LO exclusively nurses when your home, its a very good chance that your supply will be fine and you will be able to keep up with they are eating away from you.
Some people do not respond well to the pump. I had an adequate supply for my babies when I was nursing exclusively. I don't believe I ever had "low milk supply". I just couldn't get the milk out of me. Breast pumps are woefully inefficient compared to a baby. Because of my disappointment with supplementing my first baby, I tried to do everything right with my second. I took thousands of dollars of unpaid leave in order to take a longer leave and to work part-time when I got back to work. I encouraged reversed cycling and never ever gave a bottle when I was out of work. I nursed at lunch time everyday. I made sure I had good care providers who gave her small bottles and fed her slowly. I tried every pumping trick and I tried 6 different breast pumps. I saw a lactation consultant. And no, after all this "consistency" I still did not pump enough for my second baby either.

Also, 9 women in my workplace have had babies and pumped in the last six years. Only two were able to pump enough milk to replace feedings. The others, including me, pumped at home and/or supplemented with formula to make up the difference. At my highest output, I could pump 2/3 of what my baby consumed when away from me and this was not that unusual among the women I worked with.

I am not trying to be negative. I just believe it is important for women returning to work to have reasonable expectations for pumping. I have seen too many women beat themselves up because they feel like failures when they couldn't pump enough. I did it myself. And I actually felt a little betrayed by all the advice I got beforehand that made it sound like pumping milk for my baby would be a walk in the park. I'm sorry to be the naysayer but my scenario is "within normal limits". It is not uncommon. No mom knows what kind of pumper they will be when they return to work. They should be prepared for the possibilities.

Finally, I wanted to add a note about milk storage. I don't believe you can trust the guidelines you get from books, etc. Every woman should test their own milk to see how long it keeps. We are all different. My milk stays 36 hours in the fridge before my baby refuses it (I have high lipase in my milk)...I love this advice from Jay Gordon. Do taste tests on different samples that have been stored for different periods of time in different conditions. Do it during maternity leave before you build a huge stash. (The one thing he doesn't make clear is that you should rule out contamination from inadequate cleaning or freezer problems if you suspect a lipase imbalance. Also, if milk is not stored air tight, you can get freezer burn &/or bad food smells.)

Some good resources are the Yahoo groups pumpmoms group, kellymom.com & the book Working without Weaning


Finally, I want to add that I never gave up. I just kept doing my best and I nursed until my son was 2 and I intend to nurse that long or longer with my daughter. Even when supplementing, my kids got at least 75% breastmilk during the week and usually 85%. Maybe I could have pumped 2 more times a day and on weekends to make that up. But there comes a time when the disadvantages of that stress and resentment and the effect it has on your family outweighs the benefits of that 15-25% of breastmilk. I don't believe difficulties with pumping means you should give up because almost all moms who have these difficulties can still provide at least some milk for their babies. And some milk is so much better than none. Why would anyone give that up? Pumping was/is hard for me and frustrating and guilt-inducing. But in the end it is/was worth it. My final advice is do the best you can and never feel guilty!
post #48 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by beru View Post
Finally, I wanted to add a note about milk storage. I don't believe you can trust the guidelines you get from books, etc. Every woman should test their own milk to see how long it keeps. We are all different. My milk stays 36 hours in the fridge before my baby refuses it (I have high lipase in my milk)...I love this advice from Jay Gordon. Do taste tests on different samples that have been stored for different periods of time in different conditions. Do it during maternity leave before you build a huge stash. (The one thing he doesn't make clear is that you should rule out contamination from inadequate cleaning or freezer problems if you suspect a lipase imbalance. Also, if milk is not stored air tight, you can get freezer burn &/or bad food smells.)

Some good resources are the Yahoo groups pumpmoms group, kellymom.com & the book Working without Weaning
So women do have a high lipase in their breastmilk, however, this can be eliminated by bringing your milk just up to the boil and then storing it, this way the scalding of the milk kills the digestion process which starts as soon as the milk is expressed, if your milk once unfrozen smells as if it's 'gone off' then just try this and store the milk as usual.
post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by CathMac View Post
I recently read that the ducts extend up to the armpits so you might want to modify the technique to include this area. On a message board I once read about an enhancement technique, I haven't seen it anywhere else since then but it does make a difference for me.
This is absolutely correct, I need to find the information for you, but in the Breastfeeding Answer Book and The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding I'm sure that it is mentioned more than once, there are certainly diagrams of the breast to show where milk ducts are in the breast.
post #50 of 58

pumping and working

I too am working and pumping. I used a medela pump as well and have found the avent bottles work great. My son is seven months old now and we have not had any nipple confusion. Avent makes a converter kit so you can pump right into there bottles and it is inexpensive. I started pumping around three weeks just to get used to pump. I think you should be able to get a good supply.
My system for breastmilk storage is I pump twice at work and when I get home I use a dry erase marker to mark the date on the bottle and store them in fridge (I took the cardboard box from a 12 pack of bottle water) any way I keep a rolling stock in the fridge and still pump on my days off. My son only nurses off one side so I nurse him from the one side pump on the other while home and double pump while at work.
I also have my son sleeping with us so he night nurses at his will and we catch up on much needed mommy baby bonding. Its worked for us and I have even been able to donate extra milk to milk bank. Hope your situation works for you guys too. Best of luck
post #51 of 58

more help for working and pumping

I have found the steam clean sanitation bags that avent makes extremely helpful for sanitizing while at work. They only take three minutes and work great. Good luck with pumping.
post #52 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by littleburtsmom View Post
I have found the steam clean sanitation bags that avent makes extremely helpful for sanitizing while at work. They only take three minutes and work great. Good luck with pumping.
Medela makes these too. There are 20 uses to a bag and there are 5 bags to a $5 pack.
post #53 of 58
Quote:
I just believe it is important for women returning to work to have reasonable expectations for pumping. I have seen too many women beat themselves up because they feel like failures when they couldn't pump enough. I did it myself. And I actually felt a little betrayed by all the advice I got beforehand that made it sound like pumping milk for my baby would be a walk in the park.
I have to agree with this post. I felt TOTALLY betrayed by all the books I had read when I could only pump 3/4 of what DD1 needed and I was pumping 5 times a day including before bed, etc.
post #54 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by heggie View Post
Also, my LC and LLL both said that they're only good for 200 hours, so if your friend used it extensively, you might be better off saving for a new one. If you notice the amount your pumping really going down or that your breasts aren't getting empty after pumping, then that might mean your pump isn't working well.
Has anyone else experienced this? I'm beginning to suspect my pump isn't working as well. I used to be able to get 12-15 oz total at work and now it's more like 7-9 oz. My breasts don't feel empty after pumping and I can usually hand express quite a bit of milk afterwards. I can't tell if my supply is gradually dipping or if the pump isn't working as well.

Thoughts???
post #55 of 58
I wish I knew, Thalia... I don't know though.

How much of pumping is a mental thing? I've (probably a bit late in the game) finally made DD's (5 mo) bottles larger, giving her 4 oz increments now. Back when I was pumping 2-3 oz bottles I'd get 12-15 oz a day. Now, I'm barely making 12 oz. What gives?

Also do you mommas find that you need to shift the horns around periodically on the nipple to get the best flow acheivable? I certainly do. I feel like I"m constantly interacting with the pump.
post #56 of 58
Thread Starter 
I just wanted to add an update from the OP: Me.

I've been back at work for 4 wks now. The little man is doing wonderfully and pumping is going well. I am well supported at work and I have a closed conf room to pump in. I built up quite the stash from pumping on one side and nursing on the other.

I want to once again thank everyone who has posted to this thread. Your experiences and helpful advice quietened my nerves about this new experience that now already seems old hat.

To answer my own questions:

1) we ended up going with the breastflow bottles... zero issues so far.
2) I had a great freezer stash from my maternity leave
3) I pump four times a day and get anywhere between 12 oz and 20 oz at work (I work two days in the day time and two days at night, ds STTN so I don't make a lot of milk after 9pm)(I also pump first thing in the morning while nursing as well as just before I sleep and that adds about 6 oz or so)
4) Depends on the day, right now he's taking a 5oz bottle every couple of hours until he goes down for the night (he'll be 3 mo in 1 wk).

Thanks again, all! :
post #57 of 58
hi, i'm back to work after a 12-week mat leave and have been pumping at work. also, due to extreme pain from thrush i have been forced to start exclusively pumping on one side when at home.

re: bottles. i use the evenflo glass (trying to eliminate as much plastic as possible) with the medela PIS. the slow flo nipple (purchased separately) has a very wide base which is similar in diameter to my areola, which ensures that my DD's latch is consistent.

so far i've been able to keep up with DD. during her time away from me she will take 3-4 bottles of 3-4 oz each. i've been able to pump 20-24 oz each day, between home & work. hopefully this will continue.

thanks to everyone who has offered advice for what has worked for them. it's very helpful.

it's stressful enough as it is to know you have to return to work and be away from your LO without worrying about supply and where to pump, how to store, how to transport, etc.
post #58 of 58
I am on dd #2 pumping at work - she is 10 months old and I have NOT had to use formula. I started pumping at 2 days postpartum b/c I couldn't stand the engorgement! I actually ended up donating some milk b/c I had WAY too much of a supply. With ds #1, I was a nervous wreck pumping and b/c of that I didn't enjoy my experience at all. I'm a teacher, so the schedule dictates when I can pump and I ended up missing lunch sometimes. This time around, I talked with my principal and got my schedule switched so that I have plenty of time to pump. I went back to work at 12 weeks and only have had to pump once during the day. I pump in the am before I leave and then at mid day. I have rarely had to use the frozen supply and am actually going to have to start using it in her sippy cups with meals or else I will lose it. Everyone is different and every baby is different. DS #1 had to have formula at 10 months b/c I was a stress case and couldn't emotionally pump anymore, this time around it's a different story and I look forward to the 25 minutes of me time while I pump.

bottles - I use Dr. Brown's - which have recently become BPA free!!! No problems with them and actually are supposed to be closer to bfing than most!!!!

Amount of milk you pump will totally depend on your baby.

Support from your partner is CRUCIAL - when I get home he helps me wash all my pump parts and gets the clean ones ready for the next day - so I can spend time with ds.

Do whatever feels right - you can only do what you are physically and emotionally capable of doing. Pumping is work and can be exhausting - try to relax and think it's the best possible thing you can give your baby!!!!!

Mom of Mabel and Liz
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