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Preschool age children in "I am Legend" - Page 4

post #61 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessy1019 View Post
And as Storm Bride re-iterated, she WAS sad about the dog -- probably because he seemed the most real to her, the most relate-able.
Why would the dog seem more real to her than the people? Was she not bothered by the mother and child falling into the river when the helicopter wrecked? Or all of the people who weren't able to escape dying - the mother screaming for someone to please take her child and save her? If she's so adept at separating fiction from reality, why would she be sad about the dog at all?
post #62 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
Yep. I also think it could be the child cueing off of the parent. If the parent professes that horror movies are "fun" and "entertainment" then the child is probably going to at least pretend that they're fun because that makes them a part of the group. I'm sure that's not always the case, but it would be completely understandable.
In our house, I'm usually saying, "I'm not sure I want to see this. Can't we see something funny instead? I don't want to be scared." For all the drama in this thread, probably 80% of the movies we watch are vulgar commedies and another 10% are chick flicks, for lack of a better word. I'd say less than 10% of our viewing is horror movies. Not that it matters . . . I know horror flicks are a staple in other families, and that's cool too. Just not my personal fave.

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I'm sorry. I don't want to be offensive here, but I just can't get over the feeling that it's disrespectful to children to expose them to those sorts of images. They deserve to have an innocent view of the world for as long as possible. And I still do think that anyone who thinks his/her children are not being in some affected by it is fooling him/herself. That's very naive.
I'm not offended. Like I said, I'm very comfortable with my decisions, and while I think you're wrong, I'm not upset that you think the way you do. Now, I'd be angry if you were actually involved in making it illegal for me to take my children to the movies of our choosing . . . but you're not.
post #63 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
If she's so adept at separating fiction from reality, why would she be sad about the dog at all?
People cry in movies all the time. I don't think that means they don't realize that they're fiction.
post #64 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
Why would the dog seem more real to her than the people? Was she not bothered by the mother and child falling into the river when the helicopter wrecked? Or all of the people who weren't able to escape dying - the mother screaming for someone to please take her child and save her? If she's so adept at separating fiction from reality, why would she be sad about the dog at all?
Not that much time was spent on either of those events, and I'm guessing (since she didn't mention them) that she didn't even "get" that that's what was happening. I think if she'd gotten it, she would have been sad for the characters.
post #65 of 200
It seriously infuriates me when parents allow young children to watch scary and unsettling movies. Why are there so many UAV's in the world?!??!!? It really really really really really upsets me.
post #66 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by karina5 View Post
It seriously infuriates me when parents allow young children to watch scary and unsettling movies.
Why?

It infuriates me that there are parents making their children watch them, but I'm not bothered that there are parents who allow it.
post #67 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessy1019 View Post
In our house, I'm usually saying, "I'm not sure I want to see this. Can't we see something funny instead? I don't want to be scared." For all the drama in this thread, probably 80% of the movies we watch are vulgar commedies
Yeah, we like funny stuff mostly especially if we are going to watch together. Things like Harold and Kumar, Superbad, Taladaga Nights, Blades of Glory, etc. We want to see Walk Hard too. We talk about what we are feeling, what we want to watch, what we want to avoid, and so on. It's not all that complicated, lol.
post #68 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

It infuriates me that there are parents making their children watch them, but I'm not bothered that there are parents who allow it.

I fully agree. Forcing and agreeing on/to are two different things.
post #69 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
It infuriates me that there are parents making their children watch them, but I'm not bothered that there are parents who allow it.
what a beautifully succinct way to put it.
post #70 of 200
I have to agree with Dragonfly. I think if a young child is giggling or completely unaffected by violence that is unsettling to many adults, it is either a sign of desensitization or immaturity. When I say immaturity, I mean that the child has no real concept of the significance of the events portrayed. Even if the child is old enough to explain what has happened, it may be that the child is not emotionally mature enough or have enough life experience to feel disturbed. I think that is why people like Jessy1019 could watch very violent movies as a child, but can no longer watch similar scenes without being affected. As we gain life experience we gain real knowledge of death, loss, hurt, pain, etc. I don't think a child can fully comprehend some of these things without significant life experience. I don't think there is any benefit to exposing a child to violence that they can't really understand. I have no interest in making decisions for other parents, but I simply can't understand why people would purposely expose their children to these things. It isn't about banning anything; there are plenty of movies out there with content that is more age appropriate.
post #71 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
Even if the child is old enough to explain what has happened, it may be that the child is not emotionally mature enough or have enough life experience to feel disturbed. I think that is why people like Jessy1019 could watch very violent movies as a child, but can no longer watch similar scenes without being affected. As we gain life experience we gain real knowledge of death, loss, hurt, pain, etc. I don't think a child can fully comprehend some of these things without significant life experience. I don't think there is any benefit to exposing a child to violence that they can't really understand. I have no interest in making decisions for other parents, but I simply can't understand why people would purposely expose their children to these things.
Okay - but is there necessarily any problem with doing so? DS1 and I both like Brandon Lee. I recently bought "Rapid Fire" and we want to watch it over his school break, while dh is at work (dh doesn't like Brandon Lee, and doesn't share my love of over-the-top action movies). While I'll probably try to wait for the little ones to have their nap, dd will most likely end up watching it with us (she doesn't nap very consistently anymore). I don't think there's any benefit to her seeing it...but I don't think it will harm her, either.
post #72 of 200
Thanks, BinahYeteirah. You said what I've been trying to say fairly unsuccessfully.

What I don't understand, from the parenting perspective, is where the value is in exposing your children to such things. Entertainment? I'm not sure how children finding those images entertaining is a good thing and there are plenty of entertaining movies that don't contain those images. Family togetherness? How about a game of Yatzhee... or, you know, one of those movies where human beings aren't being ripped apart? It makes no sense.
post #73 of 200
We love board games, and I personally love Yahtzee. We don't play them much right now, though. DD and ds2 make it impossible to play and we haven't found any that they're interested in playing. I hope to do so...but getting ds1 to play whatever game we find will probably be a hard sell.

For a variety of reasons (weather, surgical recovery, getting in the Christmas spirit, distraction from grief), we've been watching more movies than usual in the last 6-7 weeks. Most of them aren't violent. But, sometimes, we do watch one. If dd and ds2 are napping, that's great. If they're not, that's okay, too.

We all watched Pirates of the Caribbean 3 last night. DS1 saw it in the theater, but left before the credits were over, and he wanted to see the scene at the end. So, dh rented it. DD and ds2 loved it, too. I doubt it really benefited them, but it made ds1's night, and I don't see any evidence that it harmed either of them, either.
post #74 of 200
I find movies and television for young children troubling on many levels. It isn't about deciding what is right or wrong for children because of AGE, it is about DEVELOPMENT and COGNITIVE ABILITIES. Those things happen at around the same age for all children (barring disability or delays of some sort). Even "gifted" kids develop certain ways of thinking and being around the same age as their peers.

That means that they are not viewing, understanding, or interpreting the events on the screen the same way the adult is. Their brains just don't work that way yet no matter how you explain it to them. In fact, regular screen time can actually permanently change the way their brains interpret certain signals or messages. It is recommended that children not have ANY screen time before the age of 2 and very little after that into childhood.

Much learning is done by watching, mirror neurons in your brain are activated by watching someone else perform a task. When a child watches an episode of violence the same part of their brain is activated as if they were performing it themselves.

Quote:
Nevertheless, a study in the January 2006 issue of Media Psychology found that when children watched violent television programs, mirror neurons, as well as several brain regions involved in aggression were activated, increasing the probability that the children would behave violently.
Here is an interesting article about mirror neurons

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/10/sc...ewanted=1&_r=1

Quote:
Similarly, millions of fans who watch their favorite sports on television are hooked by mirror neuron activation. In someone who has never played a sport - say tennis - the mirror neurons involved in running, swaying and swinging the arms will be activated, Dr. Iacoboni said.
There are many compelling reasons NOT to expose young children to violence no good reasons IMO.
post #75 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
What I don't understand, from the parenting perspective, is where the value is in exposing your children to such things. Entertainment? I'm not sure how children finding those images entertaining is a good thing and there are plenty of entertaining movies that don't contain those images. Family togetherness? How about a game of Yatzhee... or, you know, one of those movies where human beings aren't being ripped apart? It makes no sense.
Some people like to be scared.

I, personally, don't like it and I don't really get the appeal. But my husband and my son think it's enjoyable--and it *is* together time for them to curl up on the couch and watch Harry Potter or Spiderman or whatever. Just b/c it's not what you or I would pick doesn't make it any less valuable to someone else.

Just like roller coasters. NOT my cup of tea. But everytime I go to an amusement park, there they all are....folks lined up for days to get on those things.

Go figure. Different strokes.
post #76 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
I have to agree with Dragonfly. I think if a young child is giggling or completely unaffected by violence that is unsettling to many adults, it is either a sign of desensitization or immaturity. When I say immaturity, I mean that the child has no real concept of the significance of the events portrayed. Even if the child is old enough to explain what has happened, it may be that the child is not emotionally mature enough or have enough life experience to feel disturbed.
That could be, but I don't think it's problematic for them to see it, even if they don't understand the significance. I'm sure quite a lot just goes over her head, the same way sexual or other more adult humor in the movies we usually watch does (sometimes she'll ask why something is funny, and we'll explain it).

Quote:
I think that is why people like Jessy1019 could watch very violent movies as a child, but can no longer watch similar scenes without being affected.
Ehh, violence doesn't phase me in movies. And I'm a pacifist . . . I just don't have a problem separating reality from fiction. It's the images of monsters that freak me out -- like the girl from The Ring or the boy from The Grudge. I still watch because I don't mind being scared in the moment, I just deal with it later.

Quote:
I simply can't understand why people would purposely expose their children to these things. It isn't about banning anything; there are plenty of movies out there with content that is more age appropriate.
It's family time for us. My partner and I will decide we want to see a particular movie. We're not going to automatically leave our daughter home, we're going to give her the option to join us. She loves going to the movie theater, no matter what we see.

I also think that she does gain something from all the different movies we see -- especially the more grown up ones -- because they give us a chance to talk about things that might not come up in day-to-day life.

And bottom line, it's entertainment. There doesn't HAVE to be a serious benefit beyond that.
post #77 of 200
I have not seen this film yet - but I want to!
Hopefully I will be going to see the Golden Compass soon though! hehe (we dont get out much you know hehe)...

Well tbh it doesnt surprise me anymore. So many irresponsible parents. I went to see Saw (you know that scary horrible murder blood and stuff film - that is rated R!) and there were toddlers (yeah - 2 and 3 year olds) in the cinema with their parents....
post #78 of 200
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If you don't expose your children to the movie theatre, you only have yourself to blame if they make a scene when you do take them.
I disagree. The kids in the OP were making a scene because they were scared and their parents didn't care enough to take them out of the movie.
post #79 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
I disagree. The kids in the OP were making a scene because they were scared and their parents didn't care enough to take them out of the movie.
I think by this point we were talking about taking the kids to movies in general, not forcing them to sit through something that is scaring them, that they are asking to leave. No one here has advocated that.
post #80 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessy1019 View Post
That could be, but I don't think it's problematic for them to see it, even if they don't understand the significance. I'm sure quite a lot just goes over her head, the same way sexual or other more adult humor in the movies we usually watch does (sometimes she'll ask why something is funny, and we'll explain it).
I would be interested to see your response to FreeRangeMama's post above.
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