or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Children who are let out to play unsupervised grow up to be healthier
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Children who are let out to play unsupervised grow up to be healthier

post #1 of 114
Thread Starter 
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/com...cle3097463.ece

Interesting.

The bit about the flashers made me giggle, I remember us perfecting the point and contemptuous laugh at around that age...These days parents would probably put a kid in therapy if she saw a flasher.
post #2 of 114
that is interesting. Nearly half of children 8 to 11 were never allowed out of the house without an adult? Wow!
post #3 of 114
great article. I totally agree with its point.
post #4 of 114
I disagree with the article. The title was noteworthy...
post #5 of 114
Cute! While I totally think the article has a point, I struggle a bit. Mostly because in the culture of my town, DC is likely to be stopped by a "well meaning" stranger wanting to know where her mommy is. DC was in Germany this summer and went for ice-cream with a gang for kids between 2.5-7!! It was wonderful. I think it's illegal here. : - (

We are taking the lead with allowing DC some freedom in the neighborhood - by far. The reactions from fellow parents sometimes makes me question myself tho.
post #6 of 114
Makes total sense.
post #7 of 114
Quote:
I further think that the biggest difference between “these days” and better days is not an increase in risk but a huge increase in artificially stimulated alarm, boosted by prurient gawping at the occasional, albeit dreadful, tales of a Sarah or a Madeleine, whose agonies handily provide an excuse to impose a constant, intrusive and ultimately counter-productive adult presence upon children who deserve better.
I'm so glad that somebody is saying this.
post #8 of 114
I don't agree with the article either. I don't think the point is that a child has to be out alone, I think the point is that a child from the time they are little needs to be given lots of open ended toys and time in the outdoors. My child can have supervised but non-intrusive play outdoors when I'm gardening and she's wandering around in her own little world, or I'm right inside the window peeking out or sitting reading while she plays. A parent's supervision does not have to mean the child can't be in their own little creative world.

Children not playing outside by themselves is not the problem - children who don't know how to pay by themselves is the problem. Children growing up with things that entertain them from dance classes to karate to video games and battery operated dolls and cartoons and.... on and on - those are the problem. Not saying all of those are bad all the time, but when most of the child's time is consumed with something to entertain them, and most of that entertainment is indoors, that is the problem.
post #9 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attached Mama View Post
children who don't know how to pay by themselves is the problem.
I completely agree with you.
post #10 of 114
I think the alone part is important when it comes to dealing with life on your own. From the crotchety lady down the road to a person asking for directions. It's just different when your parent is there watching. It seems a shame for kids not to have that.
post #11 of 114
I suddenly feel like a much better parent. I give my kids a lot moer feedom than most parents; at least on here. i always feel so neglectful but I also remember running all over town from the time i was about 5 years old. with a pack of other kids. yeah we made all kinds of trouble and it is a miricle no one ended up in the emergancy room. but those were valuble times.
post #12 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attached Mama View Post
I don't agree with the article either. I don't think the point is that a child has to be out alone, I think the point is that a child from the time they are little needs to be given lots of open ended toys and time in the outdoors. My child can have supervised but non-intrusive play outdoors when I'm gardening and she's wandering around in her own little world, or I'm right inside the window peeking out or sitting reading while she plays. A parent's supervision does not have to mean the child can't be in their own little creative world.

Children not playing outside by themselves is not the problem - children who don't know how to pay by themselves is the problem. Children growing up with things that entertain them from dance classes to karate to video games and battery operated dolls and cartoons and.... on and on - those are the problem. Not saying all of those are bad all the time, but when most of the child's time is consumed with something to entertain them, and most of that entertainment is indoors, that is the problem.
I totally agree with this. I'm much more overprotective of my kids than my dh is. We grew up basically the same with lots of unsupervised time to play by ourselves. Our 5 year old is perfectly content playing outside out of our sight. Dh is also fine with this but it freaks me out a bit.
post #13 of 114
I'm a firm believer in benign neglect, so this makes sense to me.

ETA I like this quote:
Quote:
It would, of course, be ridiculous to suggest that they be left to run feral. But there is a difference between intervention when it is needed and interference as a default position.
post #14 of 114
I think the author is right that increased adult interference is, at least in part, a governmental thing. This article helps explain why my friend had CPS called on her for letting her children, between the ages of 3 and 7, play in their own yard while she was in the house.

It boggled my mind that anyone would even make such a call for this reason, and it boggled my mind even more that CPS would respond to such a call. But the caseworker insisted, in his conversation with my friend, that anytime a child's outdoors an adult needs to be out there, too.

I realize 3-7 is younger than the 8-11 the article was focusing on -- but these small children never left their yard, it's not like they were out roaming the city ... I was shocked to learn this could even be construed as neglect.

I believe in always being available to my kids, and attentive when they want/need my attention. But I agree with the author that they need the freedom to branch out as they're ready, and as they express the desire to do so.
post #15 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka View Post
yeah we made all kinds of trouble and it is a miricle no one ended up in the emergancy room. but those were valuble times.
My sister and I each ended up in the emergency room once as children. Both incidents happened in our back yard, with my parents both present. We ran around the neighbourhood a lot, and never hurt ourselves then.

I hate that I don't give my kids as much credit as my parents gave me.
post #16 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attached Mama View Post
I don't agree with the article either. I don't think the point is that a child has to be out alone, I think the point is that a child from the time they are little needs to be given lots of open ended toys and time in the outdoors. My child can have supervised but non-intrusive play outdoors when I'm gardening and she's wandering around in her own little world, or I'm right inside the window peeking out or sitting reading while she plays. A parent's supervision does not have to mean the child can't be in their own little creative world.

Children not playing outside by themselves is not the problem - children who don't know how to pay by themselves is the problem. Children growing up with things that entertain them from dance classes to karate to video games and battery operated dolls and cartoons and.... on and on - those are the problem. Not saying all of those are bad all the time, but when most of the child's time is consumed with something to entertain them, and most of that entertainment is indoors, that is the problem.


I agree.
post #17 of 114
I think it probably depends on where you live. Where I live, my daughter can play in the yard without me so long as she's within view out the window. When she's 8, I won't mind if she goes up and down the street without me, so long as she stays on our street. But my neighborhood is self-contained, we all know each other well, this is a small town where everyone knows everyone, and we have a very low crime rate. In different circumstances, I would almost certainly feel differently. Also, there's a causation/correlation problem here. Maybe the kids who are allowed to roam around unsupervised outside are allowed because they are in circumstances like mine, in which case they probably are at a level of affluence relative to mine, and in which case their schools are probably at a quality relative to ours, and in which case they can probably either afford a SAHM like me or quality and beneficial childcare rather than the childcare usually available to people in worse circumstances, etc. Those kinds of things could have caused the differences in the study as easily as outdoor unsupervised play.
post #18 of 114
What a great article! I am lucky to live on a cul-de-sac and we have 14 kids from toddler on up. There are usually at least 5 of them outside at any time during daylight, non-school times. They are usually unsupervised but my dd knows that she has to stay with them and there needs to be at least one older kid present. It's great because they play all the traditional things like jump rope and kick ball and use sidewalk chalk. THey have bike/scooter/trike races, play hide and seek. I love it. I noticed that the family whose kids are not allowed to go outside unsupervised are not nearly as social when their mom agrees to let them outside while she's working in the yard or something. They are hardly around because when they out of school they are usually in some supervised class or activity.

When the little ones play outside, we always have at least one or two neighbors on lawn chairs chatting and keeping a loose eye on the kids. I remember the days when I could bike with my friends all over the neighborhood. When my dd is older I will let her do that with a group of friends, but not as freely as I did. I was allowed go to the local park and the KFC and even the mall!
post #19 of 114
mamazee - i don't know. i grew up in poverty and that is exactly why I had the freedom I did. because we didn't have a sitter most of the time in the summer/holidays. we lived in a little dirty town outside of Dalas with lots of crime. and i am sure the places we rode our bikes were sketchy at best. Some of the running around we used to do was to get my neighbor ciggarettes.
post #20 of 114
I am pleased w/ the article because I am constantly being chided for being "so relaxed" with our son. Everyone here is petrified of "stranger danger" and their children are never out of their site, never ever. I do admit to being less relaxed then my folks (I had cousins 2 miles away that I walked to on my own at 4/5. This was with woodsy cut thru's and parts on an open road.) but I still give my child plenty of freedom. We live in a rural area w/ a state park as a back yard. He is often out there alone, playing w/ the dogs, riding a bike, playing on the swingset, etc. He walks to the neighbors on his own and while I can technically hear them I can't see them. He knows to give me holler when he gets there or to have the mom call me if its winter and the windows are closed.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Children who are let out to play unsupervised grow up to be healthier