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Eat Pray Love - Page 3

post #41 of 79
: I hope my library has it.
post #42 of 79
I just saw that my library had 12 copies and they are all checked out!
post #43 of 79
I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

I think the self-absorption was part of the whole point...how you have to become totally self-absorbed in order to fully see how completely connected to humanity you truly are.

It's the concept of "That which we focus on expands," sort of...she'd spent so much of her life living in the shallow, underbelly of "life"...distracted by dysfunction, consumed with self-loathing...and thus, loathing everything, including the world around her.

By withdrawing into herself, becoming totally self-absorbed, she was able to expand infinitely, both in her wisdom and her connection with the world around her and the humanity that inhabited it.

Besides, isn't that what a memoir is supposed to be? The retelling of one's own story--a bit of megalomania for the masses? "I believe my experience was so profound that I absolutely have to share it with the people so that they, too, can be enlightened/educated/endeared?"

I'm an atheist, but her time in India left me longing for an ashram and the capacity to meditate without distraction (Ha! Like that's possible.) Her time in Italy inspired me to slow down and enjoy life's little pleasures, such as a good bowl of pasta. Indonesia left me longing for simplicity.

I enjoyed her tone and her voice.

I can see where one might get annoyed at times, but all in all, I really enjoyed this book.
post #44 of 79
I am reading this right now. I love it so far!
post #45 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjanelles View Post
I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

I think the self-absorption was part of the whole point...how you have to become totally self-absorbed in order to fully see how completely connected to humanity you truly are.

It's the concept of "That which we focus on expands," sort of...she'd spent so much of her life living in the shallow, underbelly of "life"...distracted by dysfunction, consumed with self-loathing...and thus, loathing everything, including the world around her.

By withdrawing into herself, becoming totally self-absorbed, she was able to expand infinitely, both in her wisdom and her connection with the world around her and the humanity that inhabited it.

Besides, isn't that what a memoir is supposed to be? The retelling of one's own story--a bit of megalomania for the masses? "I believe my experience was so profound that I absolutely have to share it with the people so that they, too, can be enlightened/educated/endeared?"

I'm an atheist, but her time in India left me longing for an ashram and the capacity to meditate without distraction (Ha! Like that's possible.) Her time in Italy inspired me to slow down and enjoy life's little pleasures, such as a good bowl of pasta. Indonesia left me longing for simplicity.

I enjoyed her tone and her voice.

I can see where one might get annoyed at times, but all in all, I really enjoyed this book.
I absolutely agree.
post #46 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjanelles View Post
I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

I think the self-absorption was part of the whole point...how you have to become totally self-absorbed in order to fully see how completely connected to humanity you truly are.
I agree too. I think the self absorption piece is necessary as a part of personal growth. If you're trying to move beyond where you are in life, I believe you need to understand how you got to where you are, and what is keeping you there. That's how you shed your old baggage so that you can start fresh in your new spiritual journey.

Theresa
post #47 of 79
This is next on my list! I can't wait to get started with it!
post #48 of 79
I'm about 50 pages into it, and I am enjoying it. It's hard though - b/c I already know that people seem to feel strongly about it one way or another.

Love It or Loathe It it seems. In fact, that's what I read in Entertainment Weekly magazine now that I think about it! One critic loved it, another one loathed it, and they each said why.

So far I LIKE it. She has a fun writing style, and I think she's funny. The self-absorption thing doesn't bother me, cuz like a PP said, this is about HER and HER EXPERIENCES. How on earth *should* a book like this look like, kwim? If you are writing a book about yourself, you are going to look pretty self absorbed, and I think that is the point.
post #49 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by granolalight View Post
I love this book! I am almost finished with it. My favorite part was eating her way through Italy. Oh, to only be concerned about where your next pastry is coming from!!! : And the way shdescribes the pizza in Naples as practically orgasmic cracked me up!
I totally agree! I'm at the "pray" part. I love this book. I live vicariously thru her!
post #50 of 79
Just picked up a copy at the library after a 3 week wait. Off to start it now....
post #51 of 79
I enjoyed reading it- she's a good writer. But I felt slightly annoyed with her at the very end.
post #52 of 79
Ah, thought I'd find an Eat pray Love thread here.

Much to my surprise, I loved it. Mostly because it borught me back to my own spiritual practice and reminded me to trust in the universe. I cried when I finished it, then I was in need of another good book to keep me company. Found Anne Lamott's Traveling Mercies which was a good following book...but now what? What have you guys enjoyed reading afterwards? I'm looking for non fiction...
post #53 of 79
I loved this book! Very well written! As for the whole self absorbtion thing? I thought thats what the book was all about. Her and her finding herself. Nothing wrong with that!
post #54 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaMonica View Post
I enjoyed reading it- she's a good writer. But I felt slightly annoyed with her at the very end.
Why did you feel annoyed?

I liked the book generally. I listened to it on audiobook while I was driving to and from work. This was my first audiobook and during some of her reads I thought that in my mind whatever sentence would have sounded different to me. But since the author read it I suppose she knows how she wants it to sound. I just thought it was okay. Not the best book, not the worst. I believe I enjoyed Italy the most of the three sections. All that eating. yum.

Quote:
Found Anne Lamott's Traveling Mercies which was a good following book...but now what? What have you guys enjoyed reading afterwards? I'm looking for non fiction...
Traveling Mercies is a great book, isn't it? The whole dog abuse scene haunted me for a very long time. She has another nonfiction--Bird by Bird. I can't remember if I've read that. Operating Instructions is also non fiction. I'm starting Mountains Beyond Mountains next, by Tracy Kidder. It looks promising. I also enjoyed Three Cups of Tea, about Greg Mortenson. Both nonfics.
post #55 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiamnEmma View Post
Why did you feel annoyed?
I read it a long time ago- so hope I remember right. I loved the first parts and was drawn in- expecting more of a personal transformation. I felt at the end that she hadn't really changed. I was expecting something deeper I guess.
post #56 of 79
double post--tried to add, didn't realize I'd posted twice.

my bad.
post #57 of 79
oh, yes I see what you mean. While I enjoyed it, she doesn't really strike me as particularly deep, iykwim. Not that I'm deep, but I don't write memoirs that might suggest that I am.
post #58 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiamnEmma View Post
W

Traveling Mercies is a great book, isn't it? The whole dog abuse scene haunted me for a very long time. She has another nonfiction--Bird by Bird. I can't remember if I've read that. Operating Instructions is also non fiction. I'm starting Mountains Beyond Mountains next, by Tracy Kidder. It looks promising. I also enjoyed Three Cups of Tea, about Greg Mortenson. Both nonfics.
I loved Traveling Mercies and Operating Instructions but then made the mistake of reading more of her Salon articles and got very put off with some of what she writes about her son. on the one hand I'm grateful for her honesty about parenting, on the other I wish she had a little more respect for his privacy. but that's a new thread!

Just ordered the Kidder book at the library and have the Mortenson book here so will start it. Thanks!
post #59 of 79
I am still on a long list of library card holders who want to borrow EPL.

While waiting for my turn at the book, I have had a chance to listen to an NPR interview with the author.

Link -- > http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=17410243

Others who are waiting to check out the book may enjoy the interview as well.
post #60 of 79
I am still waiting too. I am on a long line of 40 people!
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