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I don't know how to react to this but I'm not happy... - Page 2

post #21 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature View Post
If you think they're so crappy, why donate them for families struggling financially? Would you donate "crappy" clothes too?
There are plenty of toys and clothes that *I* don't want for assorted reasons. Why trash them if someone *else* would like them and use them? If they're not dangerous, then I don't see the harm.

I donate lots of clothes that aren't my style or what-have-you. Should I not donate "out of style" clothes?

My theory is that if someone else wants them AND a worthy organization can make a little $$ off of them... then it's a win win situation.

-Angela
post #22 of 130
Wow Nature, I think you need to hang out with some new people if you're hearing that attitude too frequently. It would drive me insane to be around people saying such things constantly.

I love to go to thrift stores. I was raised that route and am happy to find things other people gave because they didn't want them. As a consumer, I don't care why they donated them, I'm just glad to have access to them. Now, if I had to hear what your hearing all the time, I would start hanging out with some other people.
post #23 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by prettypixels View Post
The Salvation Army is no longer taking used toy donations at all, which sucks, because I have a ton of very NOT CRAPPY toys that we are not using that I was taking to donate. Now I don't know what to do with them. It *would* be nice to get the tiny tax break from donating to the Salvation Army.
Is there a women & children's shelter you can donate them to? Any other family friendly non-profits in the area? I donated a bunch of my son's baby toys and other goodies to a local community pregnancy center.

To the OT - from what I've seen in the malls and in my friend's houses, there is no shortage of people buying MIC and plastic toys!
post #24 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature View Post
... going to donate them" and "These toys are horrible! They might be unsafe! And they're plastic! *insert gasp here* Ugh! I can't keep these in MY home! I'm going to donate them.." the latter being the attitude I've heard so frequently. Especially with the rash of MIC recalls in the past few months.

... Because a lot of the time it doesn't seem like they really care that what they're giving away isn't that useful, or even safe.

And you'd be surprised at the things people donate.. Broken things rank high on the list of things that get donated. Tax breaks for broken radios, cars with no wheels and clothes with rips and holes in it..

I know someone that specifically told me she gave all the recalled toys on the last list to Goodwill. Because, "Someone out there that doesn't have any toys could really use them!"
1. It is terrible for someone who knows a toy is on the recall list to donate it, especially ones that are toxic and/or used by small children. An unsafe toy is just that, UNSAFE for any child.

2. Many people do not care what they are giving away. It is out of their home, out of sight, and normally not given much thought at all. Face it, no one anguishes over what they donate unless for some reason they want to look good.

3. Just because a toy is plastic doesn't mean it has to be bad. Toys made of recycled plastic does keep landfills from completely overflowing. If you don't want it, don't buy it. But, it is not an evil thing for someone to donate it even if they prefer not to use it.

4. When I donate something to a thrift store, it is not new. I simply cannot afford it. Besides, most thrift stores by me have unrealistic prices on items that I can find at Ross or Target for just about the same price. They definately are not cheap.
post #25 of 130
I'm lost here. If there is a market for the toys then they will be sold. If YOU don't want to buy them then don't. If someone else wants to buy them then let them.

I think I must be missing the point here but I have no clue why you are bothered by what is on sale at your local thrift store.
post #26 of 130
I think it's pretty horrible to knowingly donate something that has officially been recalled....but if the toy is just not desirable to mama or child for some reason then I don't see why it shouldn't be donated, regardless of where it was produced. I'm not a rich woman, I shop in thrift stores, and I have a high quality standard...I don't just buy anyone's "crappy" toys just because the price is right...I think it's all about choices. There are plenty of people with money who don't care at all about MIC and then there are people on budgets who maybe save up a bit more (or give specific gift ideas to grandparents...thanks mom and dad for all X's awesome SAFE toys) to purchase the stuff I feel is a better quality.

I think it would be awesome if instead of being mad that people are donating MIC we all got mad that the quality of products taken in by U.S. consumers in general is so low. Our government chooses not to take action against products and manufacturing practices that might be dangerous...instead they wait until actual harm has occured. To me, that is the real outrage. Food for thought found here: http://www.amazon.com/Exposed-Chemis...0247574&sr=8-1
post #27 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by verde View Post
I hope this is the correct place to post this. If not, mods, then move it to the appropriate place.

I'm a thrift store queen. I check out the thrift store about once a week. You would not believe the amount of things in my house that came from the thrift store.

For the winter holidays my 28 mos. old DD's big gift was a wooden kitchen and it's really cute. I've picked up lots of funstuff for the kitchen from the thrift store: a tiny little pot, an little cast iron fry pan, some tin dishes.

Lately I've noticed a HUGE appearance of toy dishes, especially tea sets, from China. I will guess the donors of these toy dishes don't want their children to be at risk because the dishes were made from China. That's fine. So my question is:

WHY DONATE THEM TO THE THRIFT STORE??????

Exactly what is the thinking here?? I don't want MY children to be at risk but it's OK for someone else's children to be at risk?

A lot of the people who patronize the thrift stores in the area where I live are new immigrants who don't speak much English. I do not mean to sound patronizing but I worry that they are not aware of the publicity about the toys from China. So I feel like there's something terribly WRONG about this situation.

Am I overreacting???
No you are not.

This really irritates me as well.

People get all up in arms when the well to do imply that welfare mothers don't deserve health care for their kids, or that they are a drain on society, but it's ok for those of us who can afford to keep poisoned toys away from our kids to donate them to people who either don't know, or don't care?

I find this appalling.

Even if they don't care, how could anyone with a conscience do that?

If a large company does something like that, there is an outcry, but if a thrifty mom does it because they can't see throwing something away, then it's ok? Isn't that exactly the same excuse a large company would use? Well, we'd be wasting money if we disposed of that toxic waste properly when we an just dump it in this lake over here for free without anyone knowing about it.

It's a question of right and wrong. If you know it probably isn't safe for your child, then it isn't safe to donate it so someone else can possibly give it to their child. Period.
post #28 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpybear View Post
Because people like me who are not on the anti-MIC bandwagon may buy them.
Yup...if they haven't been recalled, I don't see why it matters. I personally don't boycott all MIC toys, and I think the "toy scare" has been way overblown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature View Post
Because this is MDC, the issue goes even further than just MIC toys. But all plastic and or cheap toys in general. Its the same thing. Personally, I could care less about the MIC craze. However it is a bit unnerving to see everyone dumping what they lovingly call on millions of threads, their "crappy toys" at thrift stores. If you think they're so crappy, why donate them for families struggling financially? Would you donate "crappy" clothes too?

Its the whole attitude I find disturbing.
Well, I prefer creative, open-ended toys for dd. We don't buy a lot of plastic. I can't even be in a room with a toy that makes noise--they make me want to claw my eyes out. So, a "Chicken Dance Elmo" might be "crappy" to me (though I probably wouldn't use that word)--but for another family, who prefers battery-operated toys, seeing a cheap one of these at the thrift store might make their child's day. If people get us lots of plastic, battery-operated stuff, I'll probably donated...but, as they say, one man's trash is another man's treasure. There are plenty of clothes that I like that someone else wouldn't, and vice versa. I think unwanted items in good condition (so long as they don't pose an actual danger, i.e., haven't been recalled) should ALWAYS get a chance to find a new home rather than just ended up in a landfill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
There are plenty of toys and clothes that *I* don't want for assorted reasons. Why trash them if someone *else* would like them and use them? If they're not dangerous, then I don't see the harm.

I donate lots of clothes that aren't my style or what-have-you. Should I not donate "out of style" clothes?

My theory is that if someone else wants them AND a worthy organization can make a little $$ off of them... then it's a win win situation.

-Angela
Of course, I could have just said : to alegna and saved myself the trouble.
post #29 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigeyes View Post
No you are not.

This really irritates me as well.

People get all up in arms when the well to do imply that welfare mothers don't deserve health care for their kids, or that they are a drain on society, but it's ok for those of us who can afford to keep poisoned toys away from our kids to donate them to people who either don't know, or don't care?

I find this appalling.

Even if they don't care, how could anyone with a conscience do that?

If a large company does something like that, there is an outcry, but if a thrifty mom does it because they can't see throwing something away, then it's ok? Isn't that exactly the same excuse a large company would use? Well, we'd be wasting money if we disposed of that toxic waste properly when we an just dump it in this lake over here for free without anyone knowing about it.

It's a question of right and wrong. If you know it probably isn't safe for your child, then it isn't safe to donate it so someone else can possibly give it to their child. Period.
But why are "Made in China" toys automatically unsafe or toxic? There's no evidence that they are (barring specifically recalled toys). I buy MIC toys. I don't like a lot of plastic or batteries for other reasons (I think the toys tend to be less creative, don't last as long, etc.); other people do, as I said. Toy dishes made in China--I wouldn't give buying them a second thought, if I like the set. So every toy made in China should be dumped in a landfill, rather than going to a kid who might really like it and whose parents might have absolutely no qualms about buying it? That makes no sense to me.
post #30 of 130
Thread Starter 
Quote:
This time of year, many people donate stuff because their kids got too many holiday toys and they need to give away the old ones to make room for the new ones, or because it's been long enough to see that their DC don't like some of the "new" toys and want to declutter their houses of what the kids aren't playing with anyway.

Are you SURE there are more MIC toys now than there were last January? Or are there just more toys now than there were in October?
Usually I'd agree with you Ruthla but this year it's definitely different. It's not just "crappy" toys or old toys that have appeared, it's an unusually high number of brand new toys, many in original boxes and cellophane -- especially tea sets and toy dishes MIC. I’ve found three sets that still have the gift tags on them. Somewhere out there, an Ashley, a Morgan, and a Zoe no longer have their brand new tea sets.

Personally I'm in the middle re: MIC toys. I'm not so worried if it's something DD is not likely to put in her mouth. But if it could go in her mouth then I prefer to be safe. That's why I noticed the sheer number of the toy dishes that suddenly appeared. (When I was a student nurse I saw the treatment kids received for lead poisoning and it’s really painful.)

There has been a lot of discussion on MDC about toy recalls and whether parents want to discard all the toys MIC. I checked out a few of the recall websites and was amazed at the length of the list. I can understand why parents might choose to simply get rid of all questionable toys. The question is what to do with those toys.

Quote:
Better there than in a landfill. Let parents make a choice.
I agree with that as long as it's a SAFE toy. To answer D_McG’s question, my specific concern is that people are knowingly donating toys that they themselves are concerned about in order to get rid of them quick and easy. I think that’s immoral. It’s one thing if people choose to buy toys MIC for whatever reason; it’s another if they decide toys MIC are unsafe and yet give them to a place where others can buy those same toys. Where is the consciences?

I am NOT talking about plastic toys or used toys or unwanted toys. In this thread, those are red herrings.

I do not understand the logic that it’s better to have a toxic toy in the thrift store then in the landfill. To me that is more dangerous because in the end it will still wind up in the landfill AND, in addition, possibly harm a child.

I don’t find the argument about the market i.e. that there’s always someone will buy them ect ect persuasive at all. We all know that markets are manipulated; they are not “free.” Just look at the cigarette industry.

Quote:
I think it would be awesome if instead of being mad that people are donating MIC we all got mad that the quality of products taken in by U.S. consumers in general is so low. Our government chooses not to take action against products and manufacturing practices that might be dangerous...instead they wait until actual harm has occurred. To me, that is the real outrage.
I agree with that mostly but I still think people should realize there’s a domino effect in one’s actions. Getting rid of toys that concern you is fine. Doing so by putting someone else’s child at risk is not fine.
post #31 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by verde View Post
I agree with that as long as it's a SAFE toy. To answer D_McG’s question, my specific concern is that people are knowingly donating toys that they themselves are concerned about in order to get rid of them quick and easy. I think that’s immoral. It’s one thing if people choose to buy toys MIC for whatever reason; it’s another if they decide toys MIC are unsafe and yet give them to a place where others can buy those same toys. Where is the consciences?
Okay, so you have people like me...I have no problem with MIC toys in general (except recalled items), although I do have very specific tastes in what I like for dd, for other reasons. So, if I got a bunch of plastic dish sets or food sets MIC, I would probably donate them--not b/c they're MIC, but b/c dd already has a ton of wooden food and dishes (some MIC!) which is more durable and therefore has no need for more of the same. So it would be okay if *I* donate the dishes? What about my next-door-neighbor, who has, IMO, an irrational fear of MIC toys due to the media hype--let's say it's the same set of food and dishes, with no recalls or evidence that these are actually unsafe.

The problem I have with chucking the stuff out is the lack of evidence for their actually being unsafe. I actually think the same is true of plastics, though you say it's a red herring. There are plenty of mamas on MDC who believe ALL plastics are toxic, not just PVCs, phthalates, etc. But I know plenty of mamas IRL who think the "toxic plastic" idea is bunk--and specifically choose plastic toys for their children because their cheaper, easy to replace, etc. And I'm not talking about people who don't have the resources to make informed choices. I microwave my tupperware. There are some mamas here who think both microwaves and tupperware are toxic (particularly the combination of the two), and would not use them in their home. Fine--but I would much rather see their used microwaves and tupperware go a thrift store, so that someone like me can buy them and save resources.
post #32 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by verde View Post
I agree with that as long as it's a SAFE toy. To answer D_McG’s question, my specific concern is that people are knowingly donating toys that they themselves are concerned about in order to get rid of them quick and easy. I think that’s immoral. It’s one thing if people choose to buy toys MIC for whatever reason; it’s another if they decide toys MIC are unsafe and yet give them to a place where others can buy those same toys. Where is the consciences?
Scenario A: someone donates a MIC toy to the thrift shop because it's something their child doesn't enjoy playing with.

Scenario B: someone donates the exact same MIC toy to the thrift shop because they refuse to allow MIC toys into their home.

It seems to me that you're saying that Scenario A is okay but Scenario B isn't, but the risk to the thrift-store-consumer hasn't increased any; it's the same exact toy! It's not on a recall list. The donator may have a philosophical opposition to owning MIC toys, but may choose to let others make their own decision. This is completely different from knowingly donating a recalled toy to the thrift store, yet for some reason you're villainizing them the same way.
post #33 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
Scenario A: someone donates a MIC toy to the thrift shop because it's something their child doesn't enjoy playing with.

Scenario B: someone donates the exact same MIC toy to the thrift shop because they refuse to allow MIC toys into their home.

It seems to me that you're saying that Scenario A is okay but Scenario B isn't, but the risk to the thrift-store-consumer hasn't increased any; it's the same exact toy! It's not on a recall list. The donator may have a philosophical opposition to owning MIC toys, but may choose to let others make their own decision. This is completely different from knowingly donating a recalled toy to the thrift store, yet for some reason you're villainizing them the same way.
:

Well put.

-Angela
post #34 of 130
because alot of people (like me) dont belive in no plastic or no MIc, and also arn't scared of the lead issue.
post #35 of 130
For me its more about the attitude. I mean, look at some of the threads we've had on here. Some people look down on those who buy MIC, and those who buy plastic. How many threads have you seen where the person says something like, "My kids love their plastic Little People toys *insert ducking smilie here that I'm too lazy to find right now* "

They write it that way because on MDC its a pretty shameful thing to admit that not only do you not really care about boycotting MIC toys, but you also don't care about plastics.

If the people here look down on me for buying plastic toys.. then why do they keep donating it to thrift stores? They look down on people, and then they keep giving them the "crappy" toys.

And yes, I realize that my rant is kinda not exactly what the OP is ranting about. So its okay, I'll be the red herring. LOL
post #36 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature View Post
For me its more about the attitude. I mean, look at some of the threads we've had on here. Some people look down on those who buy MIC, and those who buy plastic. How many threads have you seen where the person says something like, "My kids love their plastic Little People toys *insert ducking smilie here that I'm too lazy to find right now* "

They write it that way because on MDC its a pretty shameful thing to admit that not only do you not really care about boycotting MIC toys, but you also don't care about plastics.

If the people here look down on me for buying plastic toys.. then why do they keep donating it to thrift stores? They look down on people, and then they keep giving them the "crappy" toys.

And yes, I realize that my rant is kinda not exactly what the OP is ranting about. So its okay, I'll be the red herring. LOL
i agree with you, but im kinda glad they are donating their "crap" though ds has got some fabulous new toys lately.
post #37 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
Scenario A: someone donates a MIC toy to the thrift shop because it's something their child doesn't enjoy playing with.

Scenario B: someone donates the exact same MIC toy to the thrift shop because they refuse to allow MIC toys into their home.

It seems to me that you're saying that Scenario A is okay but Scenario B isn't, but the risk to the thrift-store-consumer hasn't increased any; it's the same exact toy! It's not on a recall list. The donator may have a philosophical opposition to owning MIC toys, but may choose to let others make their own decision. This is completely different from knowingly donating a recalled toy to the thrift store, yet for some reason you're villainizing them the same way.
: and to every other post expressing the same ideas.

There are many people who enjoy and even prefer plastic items, MIC items and other types of items that others may consider dangerous or inappropriate for some other reasons. It is up to each consumer to purchase items that they feel are appropriate for their family.

I think when shopping at a thrift store it is reasonable to expect to see mainstream items, it seems to me it would be unusual to find a slew of made in America/Europe/any where but China wooden toys dyed with vegetable dye in most places (you know what I mean - the crunchier toys). It is unusual to see these types of items in most homes around here.

I just donated some plastic toys that were MIC to a local foster care agency. I did not do so because I thought the toys were too unsafe for my children but OK for those poor, disadvantaged foster kids. I donated them because they were nice toys that don't get played with or I don't prefer my dcs to have, they are toys I feel other children can safely enjoy. If some of the foster parents do not feel the toys are acceptable for the dcs in their care then they are free to not choose to take those toys.

BTW, I don't think of the foster children as "poor, disadvantaged" as I said above. I chose that wording because it seems some posters feel that people donate items and don't care about the people who may be getting them because the donaters are looking down on them. I don't think this is the case in most cases.
post #38 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature View Post
However it is a bit unnerving to see everyone dumping what they lovingly call on millions of threads, their "crappy toys" at thrift stores. If you think they're so crappy, why donate them for families struggling financially? Would you donate "crappy" clothes too?

Its the whole attitude I find disturbing.
I am pondering the same thing. I have a whole sac full of toys that are plastic (which we are moving away from as a family) but I don't know what I should do with them! I feel wasteful just throwing them away, but I feel like I am giving poor quality toys to people that don't know better. If I wouldn't want my dd to have them, why would I give them to anyone else??? What should I do with them???
post #39 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcimama View Post
I am pondering the same thing. I have a whole sac full of toys that are plastic (which we are moving away from as a family) but I don't know what I should do with them! I feel wasteful just throwing them away, but I feel like I am giving poor quality toys to people that don't know better. If I wouldn't want my dd to have them, why would I give them to anyone else??? What should I do with them???
then dont think of them as poor quality toys in general.......... just because you think that way for your family, it does not mean everyone does. I certainly do not belive it and I think you are wasteful and mean by not donating them.
post #40 of 130
Thread Starter 
Well Mamas, you are absolutely within your rights to buy toys MIC if you so choose. I'm not sure how much more evidence you want that the toys are unsafe or how you can conclude that the fear about toys MIC is overblown or exaggerated.

Consider these facts:

At least 25 million toys MIC were recalled last year

China has some of the worst industrial pollution in the world. Since 2001, the year that began their economic expansion, they have had a 40% increase in the number of children born with birth defects because of the toxic runoff in their streams and rivers and the air pollution.

Korean officials complain that the industrial pollution from China is affecting their country’s air and water.

Factory workers in China work under some of the worst conditions and have few rights. Whistle-blowers are fired on the spot. Workers at some factories have complained that they haven’t been paid in months and the gov’t officials back the factory owners, not the workers.

Although for years preceding the completion of the Three Gorges Dam, Chinese environmentalists complained that the Dam would cause vast environmental damage, they were routinely ignored by the Chinese government. Now that the dam is complete the gov’t has admitted that, yes, the dam will cause a lot more environmental damage than they had originally thought and they will have to relocate 5 million people because of that damage.

The Chinese government has rampant corruption.

If you don't think any of this affects how toys are made in China, well, then I guess no amount of evidence can do that.

Carry on with your choices and peace be with you.
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