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Eating Placenta = Cannibalism? - Page 2

post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookMommy! View Post
I don't have an answer for the OP, but I will add that it would not be considered kosher, because it contains blood.

Breast milk is kosher and non-dairy for Jews
http://rabbi.bendory.com/docs/baby.php

It is similar to bee honey, which is kosher, although a bee is not.
Um... we had a thread awhile ago (a few years back, before I had my son) about whether eating the placenta was kosher or not, and the consensus at the time was that it was probably parve (regardless of the blood).

I can't find the link. There are too many placenta threads here!

I did end up eating a piece of my placenta -- I was bleeding a little heavier than I'd like and it felt like the right response. I didn't plan on it in advance, though I had thought about it, but it felt right in the moment.

It was warm and chewy but not icky. No gag response whatsoever. (And I am a quasi-vegetarian.)
post #22 of 48
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post #23 of 48
Here's another older thread with some great information, too.
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arwyn View Post
Humans are the only mammals who don't routinely practice placentaphagia. We're also the only mammals who deny our young colostrum regularly. Self-awareness and cultural mores aren't always beneficial. Debating whether placentaphagia is "cannibalism" is missing the point.
This is not actually true, many prey herbivores (horses, cows, sheep) do not eat their placentas. They just leave them and move away so that predators aren't as likely to find them.
post #25 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessmcg View Post
This is not actually true, many prey herbivores (horses, cows, sheep) do not eat their placentas. They just leave them and move away so that predators aren't as likely to find them.
This seems to contradict that cows don't eat their placentas
post #26 of 48
Thanks georgia.

I stand corrected:

Quote:
Remember, cows
were not always domesticated and it is a fact that virtually all placental
mammals eat their placenta with the exception of camels, Cetaceans (an
order of aquatic mammals including whales and dolphins), and Pinnipeds
(an order of semi-aquatic mammals including seals and walruses).
According to this source, then, humans are the only non-domesticated placental land mammals that don't practice placentaphagia (unless camels count as non-domesticated?).

I wonder why semi/aquatic mammals don't.
post #27 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia View Post
This seems to contradict that cows don't eat their placentas
, hmm

I am really going to look into that one. I can not find anything else about cattle doing that. I even pulled down a couple of my college text books.

I live on a 900 pair working cattle ranch, plus have a small herd of registered show cattle, and my BS is in Animal science, with an emphasis on large animal reproduction. In my experience it is VERY rare to have a cow actually eat the placenta, they will often lick it and clean it off like the calf, but then get the calf up and away from it.
post #28 of 48
Do you think it has to do with domestication? I'm really not trying to be argumentative...I'm honestly curious
post #29 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookMommy! View Post
I don't have an answer for the OP, but I will add that it would not be considered kosher, because it contains blood.

Breast milk is kosher and non-dairy for Jews
http://rabbi.bendory.com/docs/baby.php

It is similar to bee honey, which is kosher, although a bee is not.
I really don't know about that. I don't think eating your OWN blood is a kashrut issue. If my finger bleeds and I immediately put it into my mouth to stop the bleeding until I get a cloth, I TOTALLY don't see that as a kashrut issue. I think a very qualified Rabbi would need to be consulted on this one.

post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia View Post
Do you think it has to do with domestication? I'm really not trying to be argumentative...I'm honestly curious
Not taken or meant argumentaative .

I was actually thinking about this just now. It would not surprise me at all, that would make sense. It reminds me of when dh went to Scotland 1.5 years ago. Their sheep are not very domesticated and raised totally different and have very different instincts and behaviors. I will ask him tonight if he remembers if they eat their placentas.

ETA:sorry to take this OT, I have a cow info sensor
post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia View Post
Do you think it has to do with domestication? I'm really not trying to be argumentative...I'm honestly curious
That would be my guess. As an example, wolves (to whom dogs are genetically nearly identical) make great fathers, but dogs seem to have no paternal instinct at all.
post #32 of 48
What about other herbivores. Do they eat their placentas?
post #33 of 48
The link I posted above claims that most mammals (with the exception of camels, whales/dolphins, seals/walruses) do eat their placentas. Someone please correct me if this is incorrect. I'm multi-tasking atm....
post #34 of 48
The fact that animals eat their placentas might indicate that it has health benefits, but it is not really relevant to the decision of humans to eat or not eat it. Humans may be almost the only mammals who do not eat their placentas, but we are also almost the only mammals who do not have sex with their own parents and siblings. "Animals do it" is not necessarily a compelling argument.
post #35 of 48
I would think that the suggestion it has health benefits is relevent.
post #36 of 48
I raise dairy goats and they eat their placentas.
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arwyn View Post
It is vegan, just like milk from the same species, freely given is vegan. The "no animal products" definition of veganism is a dictionary generalization, not the actual definition given by actual vegans (unless they're using shorthand when talking to the clueless).
Yup, I put breastmilk in my cereal when I was out of soymilk!
post #38 of 48
Thread Starter 
Well; I have to say: there have been some pretty DISGUSTING responses here. I laughed my head off.

So I guess we've determined that it may or may not be cannibalism.
post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by orangebird View Post
I don't know, is eating your fingernails or skin cannibalism? Chewing the skin off your lips?

I dunno

Maybe it only counts as cannibalism if you are eating someone else's body parts, not your own. Hmm. Not sure.
It's actually not your body part. It's created by the fetus, so it's really your baby's organ that they don't need anymore. And some cultures consider chewing your nails to be cannibalism.

In any case, if you want to eat it, go ahead. I'm sure it has many health benefits, but I can't stand eating any organ meats. It's cannibalism, just acceptable cannibalism.
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamabebe View Post
It's actually not your body part. It's created by the fetus.
?? Because the genetic code for the placenta is part of the chromosomes in the egg and sperm?
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