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5 dangerous things you should let your kids do - Page 3

post #41 of 48
THank you Shaggy Daddy. I wouldn't have known that.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShaggyDaddy View Post
Never ever take apart a computer monitor or a television (unless it is LCD, those are safe) The Cathode Ray Tube (the glass part) is connected to a giant capacitor (think of it like an instant discharge battery) so that when you turn it on it will come on imediatly. That capacitor has enough juice to kill you, and it can stay charged for months or years after the device is unplugged.

Any appliance that goes "POP" when you turn it on, and uses a lot of electricity could have a capacitor. Electric Clothes Dryers for instance have 2 giant killer capacitors in them. Some very high end stereo equipment has big capacitors included as well, but those are much safer because they are usually only 12-24 volt, but they are still dangerous.
Thank you!! I knew someone would have the answer to this.

Perhaps there should be a reference to this in the op? You know, just in case...
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by shroomama View Post
A word of caution to those who let your kids take appliances apart. Yeah, I know that caution is being thrown to the wind in this thread, but still... Make sure that the appliance is grounded out and there is no electricity lurking! I was going to try to fix my microwave that was less than a year old when it broke and the appliance repair guy reminded me of this. If it has been sitting awhile, it should be ok, but I think all it takes is a screwdriver to a circuit? Somebody help me out here... I'm obviously not an electrician, but I know enough to know that I don't want to be electrocuted. Can anyone elaborate on this?
what shaggydaddy said is true.
Usually, of course you unplug the appliance first. Some appliances dont actually have a capacitor, but they can act as one anyway. an easy way to discharge the power them is to hold down the power switch for at least 30 seconds (make it a minute to be sure), after you've unplugged it. this should discharge excess power.
Otherwise, with large, powerful capacitors, you can run the power to Earth (ground it out).

and still, if you have any doubt at all; don't risk it! its a great way to teach kids about electrical safety. always assume you might get a zap. use insulated screwdrivers and proper electrical tape for wiring connections.
post #44 of 48
Yes, electrical safety is a good thing to know! Electricity actually really scares me. I am, however, not scared enough to go off the grid. I remember my dad telling me that one time he was unscrewing some part with a dime on some appliance when he was a kid. He hit something hot, it threw him across the room and the dime melted in his fingers. I also know a guy who is missing an arm because he was electrocuted and I knew another guy who died from it... So yeah, you can see why it concerns me a little.
post #45 of 48
I haven't the time to watch at present, as I am stealing some screen time while soup cooks and DH entertains two tired and hungry kids, but this thread grabbed me. We've been letting DS, who's four and tool OBSESSED, play with tools since he was quite young. He got a hammer for christmas and recently we've been helping him drive nails. . Today he and DH were looking at the goody box: nails, screws, tacks. They left it on the bed because they were called away by me I think. Fast forward two hours and I find the baby mouthing something: it's a tack. I think I've seen the far end of nail use and that was it. We're coming up with a way for a four-year-old's desire to merge with his as-yet immature ability to clean up. We'll figure it out. He's also really, really into cooking, on the stove, and sewing needles. Knives are next I am guessing! His grandparents almost flipped when they watched him use scissors, which I found very silly.
post #46 of 48
Oh, I should say DS has proprioceptive underresponsivity, which means he truly doesn't feel his body in space, so we have always struggled with how much leeway to give him because he doesn't know his own strength.
post #47 of 48
I wrote about this on my blog and put up a poll to get some sense of what people think would be OK for a seven year old to do.

I do think that we generally have become scared for ourselves and our children and rely on experts and warnings and all manner of safety devices, but really could use more thoughtfulness and a good critical eye.

We let our kids use hammers. :
post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mashenka View Post
I haven't the time to watch at present, as I am stealing some screen time while soup cooks and DH entertains two tired and hungry kids, but this thread grabbed me. We've been letting DS, who's four and tool OBSESSED, play with tools since he was quite young. He got a hammer for christmas and recently we've been helping him drive nails. . Today he and DH were looking at the goody box: nails, screws, tacks. They left it on the bed because they were called away by me I think. Fast forward two hours and I find the baby mouthing something: it's a tack. I think I've seen the far end of nail use and that was it. We're coming up with a way for a four-year-old's desire to merge with his as-yet immature ability to clean up. We'll figure it out. He's also really, really into cooking, on the stove, and sewing needles. Knives are next I am guessing! His grandparents almost flipped when they watched him use scissors, which I found very silly.
i remeber when i started kindergarten at the age of four, i had a skils test to determine if i was ready and scissor usage was part of the test

i let my 2 year old use scissors and definately got some flak at first but my mom has chilled out about it seeing him use them daily with no injuries
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