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"soulja boy" - Page 3

post #41 of 184
I also remember my little sister playing her Spinal Tap tape in the car, and the line "I wanna sink you with my pink torpedo" came on. My mom was like "Um, girls, do you know what that means?" I did, my sister didn't, but neither of us cared, we just liked the song. It didn't make us think about sex or anything.

Also, there was a Cosby Show episode where the youngest, Rudy, was about 9 or 10 maybe, and listening to her walkman singing "I wanna do it all night, yeah do it all night". Her dad asked what the song was about, what they were going to "do" all night. Her reply: "Homework".
post #42 of 184
Not sure what I think, having also grown up in the 80s happily bopping along to Madonna in my room.

This article on sexual harassment of girls in high school seems to draw some links (at least symptomatic, if not causative) to degrading tunes:

http://www.thestar.com/News/GTA/article/297971
post #43 of 184
I think most of the time, my kids are just "rockin'-out" to the song itself, and not necessarily soaking in the entire meaning of the lyrics. There are certain things I don't like, like devil worshipping type, screamo songs, but unless there are a ton of curse words, I try and let them be teens for the most part. I know there were some awfully dirty song lyrics back in my day too!
post #44 of 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by fek&fuzz View Post

Also, there was a Cosby Show episode where the youngest, Rudy, was about 9 or 10 maybe, and listening to her walkman singing "I wanna do it all night, yeah do it all night". Her dad asked what the song was about, what they were going to "do" all night. Her reply: "Homework".

I love how much funnier that show is to me now than it was when it aired originally! I really get a lot of of a lot of those shows!
post #45 of 184
I skimmed that article. I guess maybe the songs give boys new ways of expressing the kind of stuff but the sexual harassment isn't new. I can remember being sexually harassed by boys at school as far back as the 5th grade. I don't know anyone who had ever heard of this superman thing back then. The ideas behind the lyrics, though, aren't new and I think censoring the music won't get at the root of the problem. Again, I think it goes back to open communication and respect with your child. If they have that, this other stuff won't influence them as much.
post #46 of 184
Thread Starter 
I think the song will cause problems with young men who want to emulate the lyrics, and may cause an increase of forced sexual acts on young girls. i know these type of lyrics have always been around, but it seems like alot of the sexual lyrics of the past were not about forced sexual acts.
post #47 of 184
Thread Starter 
Whoa, I just went back to read that article. Do people think sexual harrassment should just be shooed off and ignored? People say the sexual harrassment has always been there, and that makes it sound like nothing should be done about it. These girls need to be taken more seriously when reports are made. Surely there are witnesses to alot of it. This needs to be taken care of not only for the girls experiencing it, but also to let the guys who do it know that it ain't gonna work, not in high school and not in the real world.
post #48 of 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkygranolamama View Post
Whoa, I just went back to read that article. Do people think sexual harrassment should just be shooed off and ignored? People say the sexual harrassment has always been there, and that makes it sound like nothing should be done about it. These girls need to be taken more seriously when reports are made. Surely there are witnesses to alot of it. This needs to be taken care of not only for the girls experiencing it, but also to let the guys who do it know that it ain't gonna work, not in high school and not in the real world.
ITA. I wish I had known that what I was experiencing when I was younger was sexual harassment. That wasn't even in my vocabulary then. I never knew it was something to complain about it. It was just normal. I used to wear my backpack as low as possible on my back to cover up my butt so that the boys couldn't grab it. It was always a certain 3 or 4 boys, though, not all the boys in school.

I certainly did not mean to imply that it should be ignored. I think that the focus needs to be taken off the media and put on the behavior. I think that there will always be some people who will think that type of behavior is ok or funny and there will always be some parents who actually encourage it. What we need to do is show teenagers that we think they are thinking, capable people who can come to their own conclusions about these types of things rather than having either us or the songs or celebrities or whoever dictate how they should behave or what they should think.
post #49 of 184
Considering that as a teen (okay, I'm only 21) I listened to ICP, Twizted and stuff of that nature (lyrics WAY worse than anything Soulja Boy could come up with-- and blatantly obvious on top of that) I definitely think upbringing has more to do with what we believe than the music we are exposed to. Granted, I have a sick sense of humor, so I can kind of laugh off the obscenities because I don't actually think that way or surround myself with people that do.
post #50 of 184
I have to admit that the real definitions of 'superman' and 'supersoak' were more innocuous than what I'd been imagining.

Basically they are a disrespectful ejaculation act on a woman.

I thought 'supersoak dat ho' meant gloating over prostituting out a female sex worker to the point of physical extremes. I know this really happens to young girls whose abusive childhoods have left them incapable of acting in their own protection.

That just made me very, very sad.
post #51 of 184
My main problem with it is that I don't want my family's money going to support this crap. Anti woman isn't any worse or any better than racist!!! I wouldn't pay to support racist music, and I won't pay to support music that is disrespectful towards women. We vote with our dollars.
post #52 of 184
I remember the *giant* flap about heavy metal when I was a kid. Giant...huge, burning tapes, parental coalitions. Because clearly Ozzy was going to make us all cult following social drop-outs, or convince us to kill ourselves and others.

What I remember thinking then was that the rise in teen suicide was a societal problem, and the music was simply echoing what was *already* going on. That whole art imitates life thing.

To me, this song is the same thing. The disrespectful treatment of women is already there, the young men are seeing examples of it around them, before they ever get to this song.

My dd is almost 2. So I have long way to go before I have to worry about this. BUt I think that I will do much as my mom did. She didn't censor anything I read or listened to. If I had questions, I asked. Did I learn a bit more about something than my peers, yes. But I was also reading Stephen King in 5th grade.

Personally, I don't think it is a very good song...but it isn't my style. I am sure there are people who think Ani DiFranco stinks and wouldn't let their kid listen to her too.
post #53 of 184
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by frontierpsych View Post
Considering that as a teen (okay, I'm only 21) I listened to ICP, Twizted and stuff of that nature (lyrics WAY worse than anything Soulja Boy could come up with-- and blatantly obvious on top of that) I definitely think upbringing has more to do with what we believe than the music we are exposed to. Granted, I have a sick sense of humor, so I can kind of laugh off the obscenities because I don't actually think that way or surround myself with people that do.
right on, and we CAN control the upbringing in our own homes, but what about the kids who don't have that luxury? they may grow up in homes where there is already disrespect toward the women in their household and then hear this song as a confirmation that that's the way women should be treated. i know you can't control and raise other peoples kids, but i sure wish musicians, especially those targeting kids this age, would take social responsibility for their lyrics and at least make a statement or something saying that they don't think women should be treated in the way their lyrics describe.

right on, again, about voting with our dollars. that's another reason i want parents informed about what this song means.
post #54 of 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkygranolamama View Post
I think the song will cause problems with young men who want to emulate the lyrics, and may cause an increase of forced sexual acts on young girls. i know these type of lyrics have always been around, but it seems like alot of the sexual lyrics of the past were not about forced sexual acts.
Do you really think that kids emulate song lyrics? Seriously?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdinaL View Post
I remember the *giant* flap about heavy metal when I was a kid. Giant...huge, burning tapes, parental coalitions. Because clearly Ozzy was going to make us all cult following social drop-outs, or convince us to kill ourselves and others.

What I remember thinking then was that the rise in teen suicide was a societal problem, and the music was simply echoing what was *already* going on. That whole art imitates life thing.

To me, this song is the same thing. The disrespectful treatment of women is already there, the young men are seeing examples of it around them, before they ever get to this song.
ITA, and boy yes do I remember the whole Satanic Music OMGWTF freak out that parents had ( well not my parents )
post #55 of 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarineWife
I think that the focus needs to be taken off the media and put on the behavior. I think that there will always be some people who will think that type of behavior is ok or funny and there will always be some parents who actually encourage it. What we need to do is show teenagers that we think they are thinking, capable people who can come to their own conclusions about these types of things rather than having either us or the songs or celebrities or whoever dictate how they should behave or what they should think.
I absolutely agree with this. When we start talking about song meanings, real world behavior, and etc kids are quite capable of understanding that they have decisions to make about their personal behavior. It's about not letting song lyrics, movie characters, or any other thing make your decisions for you.
post #56 of 184
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arduinna View Post
Do you really think that kids emulate song lyrics? Seriously?



ITA, and boy yes do I remember the whole Satanic Music OMGWTF freak out that parents had ( well not my parents )
i don't think ALL kids emulate song lyrics. I'm not saying there's going to be an outbreak of supermanning and supersoaking hos (as they claimed suicide/satanic music). there are kids that use media as their source for standards, and as i said before, i just think it's so socially unresponsible to have these lyrics without some type of disclaimer to say that women should be be treated respectfully. of course, that wouldn't be "hard" enough. don't these guys have moms and sisters??? i guess if they do they're probably so freaking rich right now that they don't care what the effects of their actions may be.
post #57 of 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkygranolamama View Post
don't these guys have moms and sisters??? i guess if they do they're probably so freaking rich right now that they don't care what the effects of their actions may be.
I think you hit that one on the head.
post #58 of 184
I think that the kids who use the media to set their standards, probably have parents who do the same thing. If parents don't see celebs/media as role models and ideals, then the kids aren't going to care either.

The whole idolizing celebs thing is fairly new. I really don't remember ever caring when I was a kid/teen. The first movie star I remember actively cataloging was Patrick Swayze. And he was the only one for a long time. I got Seventeen magazine in the mail, stopped my subscription when it was all about celebs and felt too young for me (long before I was 17.), but I don't remember this kind of hype. Maybe it was cause I grew up in Colorado. I don't know.
post #59 of 184
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdinaL View Post
I think that the kids who use the media to set their standards, probably have parents who do the same thing. If parents don't see celebs/media as role models and ideals, then the kids aren't going to care either.

The whole idolizing celebs thing is fairly new. I really don't remember ever caring when I was a kid/teen. The first movie star I remember actively cataloging was Patrick Swayze. And he was the only one for a long time. I got Seventeen magazine in the mail, stopped my subscription when it was all about celebs and felt too young for me (long before I was 17.), but I don't remember this kind of hype. Maybe it was cause I grew up in Colorado. I don't know.
yeah media has totally taken over many young kids. i didn't care much either. i think my first obsession was ralph macchio, then swayze...

i wish our schools would give classes in media literacy for those who don't get it at home. these poor kids who think media is the real world won't know what to do when they get out on their own. i can remember being little and thinking the world would be like blossom or clarissa explains it all, and when it wasn't i was a little surprised. being "different" in my era wasn't 'cool' and nothing at all like clarissa or blossom.
post #60 of 184
okay, My 19 year old sister who is very much into music videos, the latest everything says that you all are reading too much into the lyrics. That it is indeed about a dance not an actual hoe(ahem girl). That up in this hoe doesn't refer to a girl but more like up in this place or something. She just laughed when I asked her about it. I had to get her to translate some things for em ,lol like I had no idea bapes were shoes. I always thought he meant babes like girls. Anyway she says it's funny cause most people over 25 think this way but most under 20 have no idea what we're talking about, I think she's calling me old.: She says he does have some dirty songs though but that's not one of them. I didn't ask her about each lyrical sentence though so she could just be in denial.
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