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"Wait, DON'T PUSH!" - Page 4

post #61 of 80
You know, I never knew how far dilated I was with this last baby. I had stalled at 9 for hours, then at a rim for hours, so I was rocking and swaying and my midwife was gently pulling my tummy up and in with a rebozo (thinking the baby might have been leaning forward rather than back, inhibiting progress) for the LONGEST time. Finally we decided that I should get up and use the potty for a while, then get back into the tub (I had been sitting on the edge of the bed, trying to let gravity help. But the second that I stood up, my body just started pushing. I think all of the moving around helped, then as soon as I stood up, he dropped into place. I tried not to help my body push so we'd have time to get the tub filled with water. I breathed thru 2-3 contractions, then as soon as the water was deep enough, one contraction made him crown, the next popped out the head, and the next he was born. Very fast as compared to 45 min. of guided pushing with my first. I'm looking forward to my next pregnancy/L&D!!!
post #62 of 80
I was told not to push because my midwife was delivering another baby. Um, yeah, not really my problem. I just ignored the nurse. I told her "we can handle this, it will be okay" and pushed away. The nurse ended up delivering the baby. My midwife was slightly irritated. After 3 days of labor, she felt like she had earned the right to be there for the actual birth (of course she also acknowledged that it was the first time in 3 days that my body had actually cooperated with me so she knew she couldn't be THAT upset).
post #63 of 80
if you really have the fetal ejection reflex it doesn't matter what they say, you will push if you want or not. And you probably won't have the breath to say anything, so too bad
post #64 of 80
I totally agree - If you really need to push - your body will push. You dont need a nurse to tell you, you cant stop it.

However, if your midwife does tell you not to push there could be some reason for it.
My DS's shoulder was stuck. I received a 3rd degree tear and was told not to push as they turned him for me. I'd hate to think of the tear i would have had otherwise
post #65 of 80
My sister was told not to push. She felt the urge, her body was trying to push and she was told not to because the doctor wasn't there yet. I think she waited half an hour at 10cm + with a push urge? Her baby was born in distress and inhaled meconium and developed pneumonia as a result; I think babe was kept in the hospital for 4-5 days after birth. And had latch problems.

My sister is the sort of very determined person who would've stuck it out though, and she is careful to always do what authority tells her is 'right.'

I was shocked. And obviously, I suspect that 'waiting for the doctor' may have contributed to some of her dd's issues as a newborn.

Nothing could have made me stop pushing - my body just took over, they didn't have to tell me it was 'time' to push at all. We were in the process of doing pelvic tilts with a posterior babe (#1) and -- BAM -- it was time to push. Likewise with SJ - labor progressed along (fast) and then I just knew it was time to push.

ETA:
I think that there's a big difference between pushing and controlled pushing (as in when there is shoulder distocia or something which requires the Mom to modify how she pushes). With #1, the OB had me push more slowly than with #2 - I think mostly to decrease the risk of tears. He would ask me to push a little more gently or slowly at times.
post #66 of 80
I'm one of the ones who should have listened when the midwife said don't push. I had an epidural so I couldn't feel much. All I knew was I was tired and wanted the baby out so I pushed anyway and I ended up with a second degree tear. Turns out she was trying to get me not to push so my perineum would stretch. Next time I'm planning on an undedicated birth so maybe I'll feel the difference and listen.
post #67 of 80
Haha, I had it the other way around. I had NO urge to push, and my midwife kept saying it was time to push!
post #68 of 80
I was in transition for ever, it seemed...My labor was only 8 hours long, but transition was about six hours of that (I was 6-7cm when I got to the hospital). The nurse told me to push, I pushed once. She told me to push again, baby crowned, she told me NOT TO PUSH - I was pushing "too quickly" and the doc wasn't there. HUH???

Um. Right.

DD was born on the next push. I guess they thought I'd take forever to push since transition was so long.
post #69 of 80
how common are swollen cervices from premature pushing, espescially when the mother has the urge to push? with my hospital birth, i had AROM at 7 cm and as soon as the OB popped my water, i felt like i had to push very badly. i got back up on my knees and was pushing to some extent for the next hour until i was completely dilated. i wish i hadn't allowed the OB to do that though because my son ended up with two hematomas on his head as a result of me pushing for that hour prior to complete dilation. i don't think i would have had a premature urge to push if it hadn't been for the AROM.
post #70 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paigekitten View Post
Haha, I had it the other way around. I had NO urge to push, and my midwife kept saying it was time to push!
That's the usual way around.
post #71 of 80
Yes, the urge to push is very strong when it's "time"... but it IS possible to wait and not push. Not for a long period of time, but it's certainly doable. Having the doctor there to guide the baby out has definite benefits.

I'd say it's particularly important to listen to your doctor when you've already started pushing & then he says to not push because he could be making sure you don't tear or he might need to remove the cord from around the baby's neck before you push again.

My doctor told me I had major control this last time I delivered. I just listened to when he said to push, not to push, little push, big push, etc... and I didn't tear at all with this 9lb baby!! No hemorrhoids either!
post #72 of 80
With DS 1 I arrived at the hospital almost 10 cm dilated. I felt the urge to push not long after and of course the doctor wasn't there yet. The nurses told me not to push and I tried not too during one contraction and that was the worse. Trying to fight myself. I only did it for the one contraction and the doc walked in all calm and told the nurses let her push.

With DS 2 he was a UC so I did what I wanted and I was sitting on the toilet when I felt the first urge to push and went with it figuring he wouldn't come out on the first push. I stood up and went to the birth nest we had set up outside the bathroom. After the first urge,his head was already crowning as I waddled out of the bathroom. He came out completely on the third urge to push.
post #73 of 80
Quote:
Having the doctor there to guide the baby out has definite benefits.

I'd say it's particularly important to listen to your doctor when you've already started pushing & then he says to not push because he could be making sure you don't tear or he might need to remove the cord from around the baby's neck before you push again.
Have you considered that a mother's own instincts can show her to push out her baby even better than a man whom she is not even close with and has never gone through it himself? I just wanted to offer that as food for thought. Women are very wise and strong and I would suggest that we know how to push our babies out better than any man on the outside. Also, babies can still be born with the cord around the neck. A woman can remove it herself or she can just push her baby out with the cord still around the neck.

Quote:
My doctor told me I had major control this last time I delivered. I just listened to when he said to push, not to push, little push, big push, etc... and I didn't tear at all with this 9lb baby!! No hemorrhoids either!
Have you considered that listening to your own body will tell you when to push and when not to as well (and perhaps better)? Check out this article written by a MW here on MDC - http://www.midwiferytoday.com/articles/honoring.asp

"Just as a woman's heart knows how and when to pump, her lungs to inhale, and her hand to pull back from fire, so she knows when and how to give birth." ~Virginia Di Orio
post #74 of 80
" Also, babies can still be born with the cord around the neck. A woman can remove it herself or she can just push her baby out with the cord still around the neck."

My mw told me to wait and not push because my baby had a cord around her neck, i didn't even push, but she slid out. we then just unwrapped cord (3x btw) so even with a cord around the neck she was still delivered.
post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by erin_brycesmom View Post
Have you considered that listening to your own body will tell you when to push and when not to as well (and perhaps better)? Check out this article written by a MW here on MDC - http://www.midwiferytoday.com/articles/honoring.asp
Bookmarked, thank you!
post #76 of 80
Lady across the street, 7 or 8 years ago, actually had the nurses cross her legs and lay across them till the dr arrived in a local hospital...

Thank God, baby was ok...

Just another example of how crazy the medical profesion is...

Wouldn't birth with an OB if...
post #77 of 80
My second was born about half an hour after we got to the hospital. I had called my CNM and said it was definitely time, but she wasn't there when we got there, and the nurse wanted to check me to see if I was far enough along for the CNM to come in. Yeah, major feelings of abandonement by a professional I trusted, and I'm still not totally over it. Anyway, I was declared an 8, and as the nurse left the room to call the CNM, my body started pushing. No one told me to stop, thankfully, she just gloved herself when she came back and caught DD and that was that. My CNM got there just in time for the placenta to come out. I asked the nurse if she would get credit for that, and she said no, that the CNM would get paid just the same, and no one but us would know that it was the nurse who had really done the catching. Yup, messed up system, and I'm staying home next time.
post #78 of 80
As I sit here and read this thread, I am so thankful that I have never had an OB birth, only HB's and UC's.

I know if anyone told me not to push and felt I needed to, I would do what I needed to do, and if they stood in my way, I would get violent with them.
post #79 of 80
double post
post #80 of 80
I haven't read all the responses, but my midwife tried to get me to breath rather than push---I went through transition and the pushing stage very quickly. I felt like there's was no WAY I could NOT push---so I did and dd came out all at once and I tore in 4 places. She was only 7 pounds so I hope to ease this next baby out a little more slowly.

My friend had her first baby 30 minutes after her arrival at her birth center. I realized that meant she probably went through the hardest part of labor in the car (half hour drive) and when I asked her about it she said "yup, I didn't care, I was pushing!".

I think once your body tells you to push, there's not much your brain can do to override that!
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