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Whole Foods/TF(like) Veg*ns - Page 4

post #61 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommystinch View Post
Unfortunately, I think it is near impossible to compare what we *should* be eating to how traditional societies ate. So much depends on location and activity. But, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't be eating as close to whole foods as possible
I agree.


Quote:
Originally Posted by firefaery
We would be much better served to understand we need a large variety of micronutrients, and that ancient wisdom showed people in different cultures and climes how to adapt.
Absolutely. I think as humans we are pretty lucky when it comes to diet, we can thrive on many different combinations of food. The food /nutrition wars leave me frusterated and confused. I would love to find a source I could trust 100% to actually know w/o doubt(and misinformation) what it is talking about regarding nutrition. Now that would be refreshing.
post #62 of 151
I am interested in aspects of Traditional foods, but I do not understand why the conversation always goes to the Inuit's diet, especially in a veg*n forum. I know that muktuk is not part of the average American diet let alone veg*n. Why not share ideas and resources relevant to veg*ns? Then people such as myself might get on board.
post #63 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommystinch View Post
One thing my husband and I talk about that seems to be left out of these writings is lifestyle. Granted, I haven't read the books, but I've never heard them mentioned by the people that talk around here about NT, nor have I seen it on the NT board. Sure, some of these people may have eaten a ton of dairy or meat or lard, but they were also much more active people. Most of America is lazy, let's face it. So, eating that way and sitting at a desk and then coming home to sit on the couch and watch tv just isn't the same as eating that way and fighting extreme temps to live (or having to expend energy hunting/gathering, building, etc). Unfortunately, I think it is near impossible to compare what we *should* be eating to how traditional societies ate. So much depends on location and activity. But, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't be eating as close to whole foods as possible
post #64 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by melissa17s View Post
I am interested in aspects of Traditional foods, but I do not understand why the conversation always goes to the Inuit's diet, especially in a veg*n forum. I know that muktuk is not part of the average American diet let alone veg*n. Why not share ideas and resources relevant to veg*ns? Then people such as myself might get on board.
I agree. It doesn't really make any difference in my life what the Inuit traditionally ate, sorry to get sidetracked like that.

What I'm really interested in right now is traditional ways to prepare grains, beans, and vegetables. Does anyone know much about soaking grains from a historical perspective? Were they always prepared that way? I've been looking for some non-Weston Price sources regarding soaking grains and haven't come up with much.
post #65 of 151
Completely depends on the grain and the society. And beyond that the era considered in "traditional".

In the americas maize was typically soaked (with lye/water) and it was greatly beneficial. They didn't "sprout" it per se, but the soaking helped increase the protein in the grain making it more nutritious.

In practical terms, grain was dried in order to keep for longer periods. To be used it must be soaked (at least in water). From there on out it was/is sometimes ground, sometimes cooked whole, etc.

dry flour HAS been used throughout history (mill stones and all) but is probably much more used today than previously. It used to take a lot of work and thence was more a high-society item.

what info on soaking are you looking for? or do you mean sprouting?
post #66 of 151
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommystinch View Post
One thing my husband and I talk about that seems to be left out of these writings is lifestyle. Granted, I haven't read the books, but I've never heard them mentioned by the people that talk around here about NT, nor have I seen it on the NT board. Sure, some of these people may have eaten a ton of dairy or meat or lard, but they were also much more active people. Most of America is lazy, let's face it. So, eating that way and sitting at a desk and then coming home to sit on the couch and watch tv just isn't the same as eating that way and fighting extreme temps to live (or having to expend energy hunting/gathering, building, etc). Unfortunately, I think it is near impossible to compare what we *should* be eating to how traditional societies ate. So much depends on location and activity. But, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't be eating as close to whole foods as possible
ITA!
post #67 of 151
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post #68 of 151
Thread Starter 
ah man, lemongrass! now i'm totally curious.
post #69 of 151
I have some answers, if you're still interested.

eta: I was getting my bi-weekly IV so couldn't post, sorry for the delay.
post #70 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
I have some answers, if you're still interested.

eta: I was getting my bi-weekly IV so couldn't post, sorry for the delay.
Don't know what the bi-weekly IV is all about, but I hope you're doing alright.

Yes, I'd still like any answers you have. I changed my mind because I think I may have answered my own questions, but I'm always interested in learning more.


magstphil, it's really not that interesting. LOL I was just asking more about soaking grains.....which at this point I'm not sure is necessary.
post #71 of 151
I have hyperemesis and the IVs help keep me out of the ER.

I didn't get a lot done into the soaking, because I focused on the question of zinc, phytates, absorption, metabolic requirement, etc.


phytates do seem to reduce zinc absorption, however it does not eliminate it as some sites claim. So you can still get zinc from plant sources. Good plant sources are nuts, seeds, legumes and whole grains. Pumpkin/squash seeds are particularly great with nearly 3mcg/oz.

Furthermore, calcium potentiates the negative effects of phytates on zinc, so a vegan diet (lower in calcium than meat/dairy) will potentially reduce that effect.

Additionally, zinc reduces iron absorption and vice versa, which again a vegan diet (lower in iron) will work toward reducing.

Beyond that, research has shown that the body has a homeostasis level for zinc (since it does NOT store zinc) and will dump everything over that level. The more zinc you consume, the more zinc you dump. The less zinc you consume, the less you dump. One study even showed that at a VERY low level (2-3/day) the body maintained that homeostasis.

Our bodies are not helpless against the evil plant components as we might be led to believe by people with an agenda.

Here's some interesting links on the subject.

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/cc/zinc.html

http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publication...123_chap12.pdf

http://www.naturalproductsmarketplac..._0a1FEAT7.html

http://www.healthalternatives2000.co...ion-chart.html

beyond all that, there are things we can do or not do to reduce zinc absorption such as drinking tea, alcohol, smoking, using hormonal BCP, etc.
post #72 of 151
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
I have hyperemesis and the IVs help keep me out of the ER.
I had HE with my two oldest girls.
post #73 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
Furthermore, calcium potentiates the negative effects of phytates on zinc, so a vegan diet (lower in calcium than meat/dairy) will potentially reduce that effect.

Additionally, zinc reduces iron absorption and vice versa, which again a vegan diet (lower in iron) will work toward reducing.

Our bodies are not helpless against the evil plant components as we might be led to believe by people with an agenda.

Thanks for all that info, NatureMama. The part I quoted is what I found out when I did some researching yesterday which is why I had deleted my post.

I hope your hyperemesis goes away soon. That's no fun at all.
post #74 of 151
I thought another purpose of soaking/fermenting was to make the glutens in grains more digestable in addition to removing the phytic acid. Enzymes start breaking down the grains and increase some minerals making them better for us. Not sure how long to soak, how to rinse, or what to do with excess liquid- maybe someone who soaks their grains will explain more.
post #75 of 151
then why soak the grains without gluten? (we mostly use non-gluten grains)
post #76 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
then why soak the grains without gluten? (we mostly use non-gluten grains)
My understanding was that it was a means of "pre-digesting" grains because we are not ruminant animals
post #77 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by melissa17s View Post
My understanding was that it was a means of "pre-digesting" grains because we are not ruminant animals
I thought ruminants ate grass not grains. :
post #78 of 151
yea, that. they mostly eat the grasses, not grains (that's more a winter-can't-access-grass or modern mega operation thing).

we definititely can NOT digest grasses.
post #79 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
yea, that. they mostly eat the grasses, not grains (that's more a winter-can't-access-grass or modern mega operation thing).

we definititely can NOT digest grasses.
what do you think wheatgrass is? It is young wheat grown from wheat berries. Wheat berries are where flour comes from...
post #80 of 151
Corn, rye, and barley are also grasses- not sure whether most grains are grasses or seeds from the grasses.
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