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March 2008 Book Challenge

post #1 of 182
Thread Starter 
Since it's the First (technically and I'm up and not getting sleepy any time soon), I thought I'd get our new month's thread up and running. The rules are simple. Post the books you read throughout the month with a quick whether or not you liked it and/or you'd recommend it.

Some of us are number our books because we've set goals for the year, but that's by no means a requirement for jumping into the thread. Its mostly about sharing the good books we've read and steering away from the bad ones.

So, with that, avante and a happy reading March to everyone!



January's thread is HERE
February's thread is HERE
post #2 of 182
Sneaking in to stick an arrow on this one.
post #3 of 182
well, i guess i'll jump on in. (howdy folks!)

i just finished "bees & bee keeping" which was actually a really fascinating book about apiculture. it's probably a little out of date since it's from the early 70's, but i found it strangely hard to put down. for all those folks out there considering taking up a new hobby ....
post #4 of 182
welcome salty... so are you actually thinking of taking up beekeeping?

#26 Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver

The authors' family tries to eat locally for an entire year and also try to grow/raise their own food. I know some of you have already read this... I made the spinach lasagna recipe tonight and it was absolutely lovely. Yum. I've never made lasagna before, either!

#27 The Unprocessed Child: Living Without School by Valerie Fitzenreiter

Excellent -- obviously an unschooling book, but also (in my opinion) just an amazing parenting book. In fact, I think anyone who will interact with any child for more than 5 hours should read it. The author unschooled her daughter, who is now an adult.
post #5 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
welcome salty... so are you actually thinking of taking up beekeeping?
howdy!

well, my MIL had it checked out from the library. she's thinking about it, on a very small scale. like, one hive to get her own honey. i'm not sure if it'll happen. she's also got a book about goats! maybe she'll have a real farm going before too long.
post #6 of 182
Jumping in here for the first time. I am reading Monique and the mango rains : two years with a midwife in Mali by Kris Holloway. I think someone might have mentioned it in a previous post. I am about halfway through it and I love it.
post #7 of 182
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#26 Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver

The authors' family tries to eat locally for an entire year and also try to grow/raise their own food. I know some of you have already read this... I made the spinach lasagna recipe tonight and it was absolutely lovely. Yum. I've never made lasagna before, either!
DW and I just got this and are starting to read it together.
post #8 of 182
Well, I finished The Arms of God by Lynne Hinton. Very sad. I certainly wouldn't read it again. The writing was goood, and I really liked some of the descriptions of how characters felt, but eegh, I guess it just left me feeling depressed and wanting something light and funny.

So now I'm reading On the Bright Side, I'm Now the Girlfriend of a Sex God: Further Confessions of Georgia Nicolson! And Ina May's Guide to Childbirth.
post #9 of 182
#11: Criss Cross, by Lynne Rae Perkins

Young adult novel about a quirky cast of characters in their teens. Easy read, funny and insightful. No great angst or tragedy. Great conversations between the characters. I will have to find her other novel!
post #10 of 182
I might join in the challenge!!! I love to read and read a vast range of books. I always have 2-3 childcare/parenting books on the go and a couple others for myself.

I just finished

The Web by Johnathan Kellerman
IMO it wasn't as good as his other Alex Delaware novels. I felt it was kind of slow and by the time the action and intrigue started I was impatient. It did however have an interesting commentary on nuclear testing in the south pacific (something dear to my heart) and government cover-ups. I would only reccomend it if you are a real fan.
post #11 of 182
i'm most of the way through Silas Marner. I'm loving it! this is the first book of George Eliot's that I've read. Can anyone tell me if I'll enjoy any of her others as much?
post #12 of 182
"White Darkness" by Steven D. Salinger

This was really well done - I couldn't put it down. There was some violence that was really hard to read - I defintely had some disturbing dreams last night.

The book took place part in Haiti and part in New York - about a corrupt colonel in Haiti and his influence spills over to the US.
post #13 of 182
Blood and Thunder: The Epic Story of Kit Carson and the Conquest of the American West by Hampton Sides.
Hampton Sides is a great historical writer, but his material is heavy.


Blessings by Anna Quindlen. She's a great non-fiction writer, but this fiction story is just ok. I think she tried to put in too many characters in a rather short novel, and none of them get developed enough.
post #14 of 182
#5 Rainbow's End by Erene Hannon

My mom gave me this book. It's one of those Love Inspired books. I thought it was pretty good. Nice story.
post #15 of 182
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
"White Darkness" by Steven D. Salinger

This was really well done - I couldn't put it down. There was some violence that was really hard to read - I defintely had some disturbing dreams last night.

The book took place part in Haiti and part in New York - about a corrupt colonel in Haiti and his influence spills over to the US.
Sounds interesting, I'll have to put it on my list.
post #16 of 182
First post in Book Challenge threads

Hi all, just joining in for the first time, not sure how I'll do in here, as my reading is sometimes at 3 books per week and sometimes at 1/3 of a book a month! Right now I am reading (or listening to books on CD) while my almost toddler nurses/naps on me. This means about 3 hours a day so I am reading quite a bit.

So far for March:

Finished up The Eyre Affair (book 1 in the Thursday Next series) by Jasper Fforde.

Loved it, for anyone that, like me, was an English major/Art History minor (or has these interests), these books are so much fun! But anyone who likes to read fiction should enjoy them. Little hokey, slight "film (or fiction) noir" feel, but more tongue-in-cheek than anything else. Also reads a bit like what 1984 would be if it weren't a political allegory (huh? well, makes sense to me) and if it focused only on a so-called "Ministry of Literature" (which Fforde calls "Special Ops 27:LiteraTecs", or Literary Detectives.)

Lost in a Good Book (book 2 in Thursday Next series). Even better than the first, I think.

Just starting the third book, Well of Lost Plots.

Also read: "What Do You Do?", "Peter Rabbit's 5 Fluffy Bunnies", "The Real Mother Goose", and "Goodnight Gorilla". Oh wait, guess those don't count!!!
post #17 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy926 View Post
#11: Criss Cross, by Lynne Rae Perkins

Young adult novel about a quirky cast of characters in their teens. Easy read, funny and insightful. No great angst or tragedy. Great conversations between the characters. I will have to find her other novel!
I liked this one, too!

#28 A Special Mission: Hitler's Secret Plot to Seize the Vatican and Kidnap Pope Pius XII by Dan Kurzman
More non-fiction. Wasn't as compelling as it could have been, but interesting.
post #18 of 182
#1 The Ruins by Scott Smith
This was a nice, light, quick read. Although it's a horror novel, it wasn't really scary to me-- just really fun to read-- like watching a soap opera.

Now I'm reading Pushed: The Painful Truth About Childbirth and Modern Maternity Care by Jennifer Block

Can someone recommend to me a paperback book (fiction) that doesn't weigh a lot for me to take on a trip? I would like it to be "meaty" but at the same time fun to read.

Lorette
post #19 of 182
#9 New Moon by Stephenie Meyer
love it, totally a Jacob fan here!!! I will start Eclipse tomorrow and already have the 4th book on preorder for August!

I have to admit that I've started three books since my last post and haven't been able to get through any of them. I read 1/4 of Prodigal Summer by Kingsolver and just couldn't get into it. Then I tried some freebies on the library table. . .ugh. After the Meyer books, a friend loaned me her fav book a Prayer for Owen Meany by Irving that I will read since she gave it to me. I read the reviews and am not sure I will enjoy it, but we will see

January '08: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer)
post #20 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorette View Post
Can someone recommend to me a paperback book (fiction) that doesn't weigh a lot for me to take on a trip? I would like it to be "meaty" but at the same time fun to read.
I don't know how much these would weigh (except for Outlander which is 850 pages or so!) or even if they are in paperback yet, but Water for Elephants (Gruen) and The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) both are great books. Outlander (Gabaldon) is great too, if you like historical-fiction-time-travel-burly-Scotsman type of reading.

Or, anything by Laurie King.
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