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post #21 of 89
On the subject of CSA's I found one in our area are they always this expensive?

http://www.lettucepatchgardens.com/C...prings_csa.htm
post #22 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeca View Post
On the subject of CSA's I found one in our area are they always this expensive?

http://www.lettucepatchgardens.com/C...prings_csa.htm

In Maine the prices ranges from about $475-525 a season and a season is 20 weeks give or take. Generally I get enough produce for 2 adults and a kid, which since both kids are not huge veggies eaters is enough though I also supplement by going to the farmers market.

Honestly I have mixed feelings about CSA's, I have belonged to 2 different ones and while its great to get such fresh food, I am not sure I would say its a bargain financially, I suppose if you are a super adventurous eater uts a deal. Yet for me weeks I got stuff like kohlrabi or brussel sprouts that was just wasted food, personally I am more a fan of farmers markets though even they are not super cheap in my area. Last summer tomatoes during the summer were almost $4 a pound organic. I think value and savings is dependent on location.

For me CSA's are about local produce not so much to save money.

Shay
post #23 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by shayinme View Post
Honestly I have mixed feelings about CSA's, I have belonged to 2 different ones and while its great to get such fresh food, I am not sure I would say its a bargain financially, I suppose if you are a super adventurous eater uts a deal. Yet for me weeks I got stuff like kohlrabi or brussel sprouts that was just wasted food
I would agree with that -- we have participated in a CSA for the last couple years and while we get some good veggies, we have typically received a LOT of bok choy. Which I like in moderation but really a family of 3 can only eat so much bok choy. Last year we split our CSA box with another family and that was less cost/waste but it was also more of a pain to coordinate, like who picked it up each week and splitting the "good stuff" between families. I'm not really sure if it saved us money. FTR though I would be THRILLED if our CSA loaded us up on brussel sprouts, I love them! We would get a little broccoli and every now and then asparagus, but mostly it was green leafy sort of veggies.
post #24 of 89
How is the quality on CSAa? I must admit, I like to choose my own produce at the FM, and am a little wary of what I might get in a CSA....
post #25 of 89
Weirdly, for us, a lot of what we eat is cheaper processed than making our own. The main thing I can think of is lasagna. To make as much I'd need to to feed us, would cost somewhere between $15-$18, even buying the stuff on special. We can buy similar/bigger lasagna's with more variety of things in them for about $12. Part of me feels like we should be eating healthier, but it's cheaper & easier, both very important to us given our very limited budget & the fact both dh & I hate coooking.

I do wish I could manage to create a decent sourdough starter and actually keep it alive long enough to make some good bread, though. Sourdough bread is the only kind we've found that dh can eat, and it's gone up a lot in price already.
post #26 of 89
Well actually I found a pretty awesome site where people share great deals on food, HBA and well... pretty much everything.

I have done really well with the HBA part of it (Shampoo's Conditioner's Soap's Toothpaste's Razor's ETC.) that I have alot more money to spend on food items.

Right now, I am in the stockpiling stage for food. We are on the brim of a MAJOR recession, so I am going to stock until there is no more room to stock. Most of it is free or near free when I buy it, so if for some reason we pull through this I will give what I don't need to friends and family in need, and then shelters etc.

PM me if you would like more details!
post #27 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
How is the quality on CSAa? I must admit, I like to choose my own produce at the FM, and am a little wary of what I might get in a CSA....
We've never had a quality concern, all our CSA food has been extremely fresh and tasty. But I would guess this just really depends on your farm.
post #28 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotBroken View Post
Well actually I found a pretty awesome site where people share great deals on food, HBA and well... pretty much everything.

I have done really well with the HBA part of it (Shampoo's Conditioner's Soap's Toothpaste's Razor's ETC.) that I have alot more money to spend on food items.

Right now, I am in the stockpiling stage for food. We are on the brim of a MAJOR recession, so I am going to stock until there is no more room to stock. Most of it is free or near free when I buy it, so if for some reason we pull through this I will give what I don't need to friends and family in need, and then shelters etc.

PM me if you would like more details!
Even the MSM is now tossing around the word DEPRESSION and comparing these times to 1929. THAT IS NOT GOOD.
post #29 of 89
We went vegetarian again, and it cut our grocery bill in HALF.
post #30 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
How is the quality on CSAa? I must admit, I like to choose my own produce at the FM, and am a little wary of what I might get in a CSA....

Well I have never had much of a complaint as far as quality at CSA's, generally its very good. My biggest issue is that even belonging to a CSA, I still am at the farmers market since aside from tomatoes and lettuce, it seems I never get enough of the stuff I like (snap peas being an example). Last summer despite paying $450 for a 20 week share, I was still averaging $50 a week at the farmers market, which adds up. Also IMO unless you are totally committed to cooking whatever you get which I am not its sometimes wasteful, the first 2 seasons I probably ended up tossing half the stuff out or letting it rot.

Shay
post #31 of 89
Find a CSA on www.localharvest.org! We just found ours for the upcoming season and it's awesome. $420 for May-November and you get honey, maple syrup, grains from a local mill, veggies, fruits, herbs, and flowers. All for less than $20 a week!

Meal planning help: www.savingdinner.com For a small fee you can get menu mailers, which have entire shopping lists and recipes for the week all easily organized. You do save a lot of money and it's all very healthy.

I also found some useful things at www.hillbillyhousewife.com but it requires some tweaking, as she advocates margarine and we only use butter and some things are higher in sodium, etc. but good for frugal ideas!
post #32 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Usually Curious View Post
Even the MSM is now tossing around the word DEPRESSION and comparing these times to 1929. THAT IS NOT GOOD.
Wow, I didn't realize. Perfect timing for me to have brought a baby into the world. Though I wouldn't have it any other way.
post #33 of 89
The CSA here is super pricey. There is no way we could afford to join and I dont think we would use alot of what you get with ours. Like 5 potatoes but 3 bunches of kale/ week.

Another thing, the day old bread store I buy all of our bread there now. It is cheaper then even making bread ourselves, as flour is SOOOOO expensive, or the bread at Costco.

I got 5 loaves of good bread (no HFCS) for $6.80

I do not want to hear/ think the word depression.

I dont buy much prepackaged food anymore and am cooking alot more simply. I will buy a huge bag of tortilla chips at costco, and pretzels for dh to take to work. We eat oatmeal (bought in bulk) for b'fast, leftovers or pb & j for lunch and a good dinner. And lots of apples/ bananas/ yogurt for snacks.

I buy most produce through a local organic co-op.

We are vegetarian, and eat beans of some sort almost every night, along with some kind of rice or pasta and veggie.
post #34 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiloh View Post
with wheat/bread prices rising should I be baking my own bread?
I have just started making my own bread and crackers, too. Since I like good quality whole wheat bread I am positive it saves money (even though the homemade stuff is sooo tasty that my DH eats a lot more of it). If I bought Wonder bread :Puke at the thrift outlet I probably wouldn't be saving much by making my own.
post #35 of 89
Thread Starter 
got the organic wheat, yeast etc today

Quote:
Even the MSM is now tossing around the word DEPRESSION and comparing these times to 1929. THAT IS NOT GOOD.
one of my pinko commie websites had a caption to a story saying buy canned foods and shot guns for next year...

I got to get on my plan soon as stuff is getting expensive and with the 6 of us..I cannot afford to double triple my groceries - is the government INSANE?
Oil has doubled...and expected to go higher, interest rates going higher...drugs and health stuff - higher...now food..WTF...

Most people can't afford more a month - regardless of how much $ they make...
post #36 of 89
I am starting a vegetable garden and I meal plan around what I have and whats on sale.
post #37 of 89
It's cheaper to make sourdough if you're going to make your own bread. We made our first this week, and it was *soooo* good. Basically, you're using wild yeast instead of yeast you buy.

Why is the government always blamed for rising prices? There's only so much the government can do. We're becoming a global economy, there's just more competition for goods, so the prices are going to rise.
post #38 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SusannahM View Post
Why is the government always blamed for rising prices? There's only so much the government can do.
Lets see...

32 billion per month spent in Iraq, basically money stolen from our pockets, stolen from our economy.

Lax housing regulations caused a big fat housing bubble, guess whose tax dollars get to fix this, guess who suffers from the housing collapse...

those are the 2 biggest that come to mind.
post #39 of 89
Often our CSA sent us stuff that we couldn't use up in a reasonable amount of time, but I would blanch it and freeze it so I could save it for those months when we wouldn't be getting any more vegetables.
post #40 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommytoTwo View Post
I am starting a vegetable garden and I meal plan around what I have and whats on sale.
Same here. I'm hoping to have veggies/herbs on hand to leave room in the budget for flour, eggs etc as they go up and up like they have been. I wish we had more freezer space!
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