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Do I really have to supplement with formula? - Page 3

post #41 of 115
It's really just a difference in opinion. If *you* want to keep a store- go right ahead.

I don't think it is appropriate to tell every mother that she NEEDS to keep a store. That's all.

I also think that pumping CAN cause problems. I had oversupply issues. If I had pumped any time in the first 3 months or so it would have just made my life harder in regards to finally getting my supply evened out. Add to that my dd would not take expressed milk in ANY form and it would have been a big pain for NO benefit.

-Angela
post #42 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyleigh33 View Post
I don't really see why mamas are boasting that their babes have never had bottles (of BM). What difference does that make?
Because it's also a cultural belief that every baby will "need" a bottle at some point. I don't assume that it's always a matter of boasting, but I'm sure some moms feel worthy of a pat on the back for resisting what is sometimes incredible pressure.

Of course, bottles do sometimes make a difference -- nipple confusion/preference and premature weaning are very real situations. Of course, they don't always happen when a bottle is introduced, but sometimes they do. Editing in that I forgot to consider the greater likelyhood of milk becoming contaminated during storage or by the bottle itself and the potentially dangerous plastics that bottles are made of.
post #43 of 115
Thread Starter 
I will say that I pumped off excess at the very beginning, which I know now wasn't the best idea, but I was SO uncomfortable. When I was hospitalized for two days when dd was a week old due to a crazy mastitis infection, it was that milk (and a bit donated by my sister, and a tiny bit from SO who was nursing her too at the time) that saved us from formula feeding.

I was glad I listened to my gut on that one (something told me to pump) but I'd say my situation was reasonably rare. I think having a TINY bit of milk in the freezer is great. I am SUCH a type A personality and so freaked by what happened that I pump every day during dd's nap time and have a great freezer stash.

But I'm a stay at home mom and I never make plans that keep me away for more than a few hours (and then only for the occasional odd childcare job I take to earn some extra cash). Go figure.
post #44 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
And I disagree Unless mom has some reason to expect impending serious illness, it's really silly to go to all that trouble for "just in case"

Just like "some" people think all moms should have formula in their emergency supplies- just in case! I disagree.

-Angela
My 'just in case' stash has proven very useful--to other babies! I didn't start out pumping a little extra here and there with the intention to donate but so far 3 separate moms have run into problems where my 'surplus' milk help keep their babies from having to drink formula. I am so glad I was able to be of help and I don't feel like it was silly at all.
post #45 of 115
I also keep a freezer stash for the what if's. DS doesn't take a bottle, but if I became seriously ill or died, he would obviously have to learn. So if I was hospitalized for a week ot two as of right now, we have enough EBM for him. It would be nice for him to be able to slowly transition to formula by mixing it with ebm if I were to die. Who knows what will happen.

I hear ya on the crazy mastitis. With my dd, I had mastitis and waited on the antibiotics. I then developed an abcess which I blew off, had nipple necrosis, and all kind of issues. I want to be prepared if something crazy like that happens this time.
post #46 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanno View Post
My 'just in case' stash has proven very useful--to other babies! I didn't start out pumping a little extra here and there with the intention to donate but so far 3 separate moms have run into problems where my 'surplus' milk help keep their babies from having to drink formula. I am so glad I was able to be of help and I don't feel like it was silly at all.
That is FABULOUS. Kudos to all moms who donate milk.

-Angela
post #47 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyleigh33 View Post
I don't really see why mamas are boasting that their babes have never had bottles (of BM). What difference does that make?

I never understand what magically happens at 12 months that magically babies are OK to have milk intended for baby cows instead of milk intended for baby humans? Why not 11 months? Or 14? I am totally serious.
Because having a kid who won't take a bottle is bloody hard work, so they need all the pats on the back!

At/around 12 months the kidneys are mature enough to deal with the concentration of cows milk.
post #48 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Add to that my dd would not take expressed milk in ANY form and it would have been a big pain for NO benefit.

-Angela
Make sure you introduce the bottle between 3 and 6 weeks with the next one and you may not have the same problem.

Good luck!
post #49 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by wannabe View Post
Make sure you introduce the bottle between 3 and 6 weeks with the next one and you may not have the same problem.

Good luck!
Absolutely not!

I have no intention of using bottles with this one either.

ANY artificial nipple at ANY time can cause breastfeeding problems. After what I went through with dd I'm hoping to have an uneventful breastfeeding relationship this time.

In no way is taking expressed breastmilk as important for my child as a good breastfeeding relationship.

-Angela
post #50 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by wannabe View Post
Make sure you introduce the bottle between 3 and 6 weeks with the next one and you may not have the same problem.
Also, all breastfeeding friendly sources say wait until 6 weeks for bottles.

-Angela
post #51 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by wannabe View Post
Make sure you introduce the bottle between 3 and 6 weeks with the next one and you may not have the same problem.

Good luck!
That seems pretty early.

Might avoid that "problem" but I can see it giving rise to some far more serious problems.
post #52 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by wannabe View Post
Make sure you introduce the bottle between 3 and 6 weeks with the next one and you may not have the same problem.
Just thought I'd add that I never said that it was a problem It was never a "problem" at all- just the way things were.

-Angela
post #53 of 115
I have to agree that if ALL babies NEEDED formula, the human race would have been in a real pickle before it was invented.

However all this "bottles cause major problems" talk sure is disheartening to a former SAHM who no longer has the luxury to do so with my upcoming little one. I'll be pumping and away from him three days a week from about eight weeks on.
post #54 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
I've had four children and none have ever had a drop of formula.

If you would wean her before a year, then you would have to give formula. But it doesn't sound like you're planning on doing that, and barring any sort of medical catastrophe, it's highly unlikely she'll wean herself before a year.

You're doing great, mama. Don't listen to the naysayers!
that

Ds is18 months and still about 90%, Never had a drop of formula! Babies do not NEED formula they NEED breastmilk first then if there is medical crisis then formula could be used as a tool.
post #55 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeder View Post

However all this "bottles cause major problems" talk sure is disheartening to a former SAHM who no longer has the luxury to do so with my upcoming little one. I'll be pumping and away from him three days a week from about eight weeks on.
You might be fine!! A lot of babes do fine with both.

I guess the point here is that many also dont, and if you don't have to take the risk it's worth considering that it is indeed a risk. I did hear about the 4-6 week window for introducing a bottle with my daughter, and I remember how hard nursing was in the early days and I would stare at the bright shiny bottle and fantasize. But by the time she was 4 weeks nursing was easier and I decided to hold off. Of course at 3 or 4 months when I tried again she wouldn't take it. Which was actually fine for us as I was not working, and looking back I'm really glad I didn't take the risk. We have had a long and really beautiful nursing relationship and I wouldn't give that up for the added convenience of the bottle.
post #56 of 115
I'm glad yu had no problems with it, Alegna. How will Savannah feel about it next time?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calidris View Post
That seems pretty early.

Might avoid that "problem" but I can see it giving rise to some far more serious problems.
It's what's recommended by lll, kellymom, etc for dyads without issues. After six weeks you're more likely to have refusal problems. And of course they can always START refusing at any age.

Can you point me to a discussion of where judicious intro of a bottle in the recommended way causes more problems than having no way to feed a baby when the mother's at work? Otherwise why do they reccomend it?
post #57 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by wannabe View Post
I'm glad yu had no problems with it, Alegna. How will Savannah feel about it next time?
Not sure what you mean. How will she feel about what?

Quote:
It's what's recommended by lll, kellymom, etc for dyads without issues. After six weeks you're more likely to have refusal problems. And of course they can always START refusing at any age.

Can you point me to a discussion of where judicious intro of a bottle in the recommended way causes more problems than having no way to feed a baby when the mother's at work? Otherwise why do they reccomend it?

No one is saying not to use bottles if mom has to go back to work. I'm speaking of situations where the bottle is not *needed*

-Angela
post #58 of 115
Just wanted to chime in as one more person who never needed to supplement. DS (now 20 months) has never had formula (although he has had bottles of EBM, since I work and DH, as a SAHD, wasn't quite equipped to fill in on the nursing front). He had BM pretty much exclusively until around 6-7 months, then we slowly introduced solids, but mama milk was his main staple for at least the first 13 months.

He doesn't nurse quite as much now that my supply plummeted (/ue to pregnancy), but still occasionally when he's tired or just wants an extra cuddle. So, you can do it! Don't let all the naysayers bring you down...
post #59 of 115
gosh this sounds like what my dh's oma told me she was all like well if you keep on just giving her breast milk (talking about my dd2) she gonna get constipated you will have to give her formula to keep her regular OMG how freaking crazy is that!? LMBO!!!! NO you do NOT have to give formula ever unless your child sin't thriving or something like that.
post #60 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Not sure what you mean. How will she feel about what?
About sharing you. Or rather, not really sharing, because you holding the new baby most of the time is HARD on a pre-schooler. And if you cannot go for an hour without having to stop what you're doing to feed the new baby she may well be upset. Being able to take her out for a couple of hours, or NOT delatch her during the night to feed the newbie might make a big difference.
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