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Feeling the "downturn" - Page 4

post #61 of 86
Mel has some really cute (decorative) SFG layouts on his site.

If you click on the homepage, then "Waterwall" then scroll down and click on "Advanced Design" - he's got ideas (and a kit you *could* buy) for "Pyramid SFG).

I wish I had a house with a backyard!
post #62 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by llamalluv View Post
Mel has some really cute (decorative) SFG layouts on his site.

If you click on the homepage, then "Waterwall" then scroll down and click on "Advanced Design" - he's got ideas (and a kit you *could* buy) for "Pyramid SFG).
I wish I had a house with a backyard!
Thanks! I'll go check it out. I wish our backyard wasn't full of so much concrete (it's an old barn floor that's mostly covered with grass) but it is nice to have a backyard. If only we could fence it in, but with so much concrete that's really unlikely!
post #63 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyarn View Post
That is exactly what I am doing...do I need those 60+ tubes of toothpaste? Nope! But CVS PAID me to take every one of them out the door. I won't pay even a penny for toothpaste cuz it's free so often...I mean, look at my pictures! Those 60 tubes of toothpaste represent $60 at my next garage sale...I'm making a profit and they're still getting a great deal. Excedrin is another thing...do I need 20+ boxes? Advil PM, I don't even use it. But they are sellable at $1 per box. I had 4 garage sales (or went in on) last year and made at least $300 at each of them...and I was a new couponer, had just started in January. All that toilet paper sitting there, with the exception of the 2 darker blue packages, cost me a TOTAL of $2.03. Same with the Viva...I can't remember the exact cost, but it was close to nothing. All the Lipton rice was on sale for $1.00 per package, I had 75 cent coupons, then when you bought 10 of them, you got a free rotisserie chicken from the deli. I did that deal 2 or 3 times! You can't buy an uncooked chicken for what I got the chicken and the rice for! Anyway, this thread has been interesting!


Mind sharing your secrets?
post #64 of 86
Some random thoughts from your northern neighbours...We're sitting pretty with a booming economy and still-rising house prices....and nobody believes what happened to you guys down south will happen to us. It's crazy. :eyeroll:

Personally, our family is sitting comfortably with savings in the bank, no mortgage (we rent) and a good tight budget that allows us to keep saving (thank you, frugal people!). We're waiting for the housing crash so we can buy ourselves a small acreage and live even more sustainably.

I feel like I have a much better perspective on things because of this board. Reading stories about people who are upside down on their mortgages, can't sell their homes...people in my city think that could NEVER happen here. And while we always did pay more for food than you 'mericans, we're seeing record gas prices (was recently $1.25/litre, which works out to about $5/gallon). Thankfully we only fill our car once or twice a month, so doesn't hurt us as much. I can't imagine what all those people driving in to work from the 'burbs every day are paying.

I'm with whoever said that these things are a mixed blessing. It makes people smarten up with their money so that next time when things are good they won't rack up CC bills or buy houses they can't afford. It makes people think about living more sustainably. I'd love to see more people growing their own food and saving energy.

And Square Foot Gardening rules!
post #65 of 86
Quote:
Some random thoughts from your northern neighbours...We're sitting pretty with a booming economy and still-rising house prices....and nobody believes what happened to you guys down south will happen to us. It's crazy. :eyeroll:
I hear you no one will talk to me about the effects that should hit us up north....I am no one's best friend lately But we rent too and I can't wait for the housing crash
post #66 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piglet68 View Post
Some random thoughts from your northern neighbours...We're sitting pretty with a booming economy and still-rising house prices....and nobody believes what happened to you guys down south will happen to us. It's crazy.
Which I don't understand ... because Canada ALWAYS echoes what happens in the states. Why can't people get it that if the 'mericans don't buy it, we don't make it, which means we get laid off and have no money to spend? Straight forward, people. We simply do not have the population to sustain ourselves within the current economic structure (read: globalization...).

We started paying close attention when the sub-prime disaster began ... because if you folks stateside don't build, we don't have an economy. So right now, our economy is "floating" on a consumer engine instead of an infrastructure engine. When American consumers decide they've run out of money, borrowed or stockpiled, and stop spending ... our economy will flatten --- thanks to the good ol' Free Trade Agreement.
post #67 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittywitty View Post


Mind sharing your secrets?
i like www.slickdeals.net and click on forums and then "deal talk" then target or click B&M drugstore deals....cvs....theres ALOT to learn and it takes some time.
post #68 of 86
The thing about gas prices is this --

I remember paying $1.25/gallon for gas when I was a teenager, 20+ years ago. Minimum wage was $3.15/hr (and had just gone up to that.)

THree years ago, gas around here aws still occasionally available for $1.35/gallon. It had gone up only minimally in 17 years. Meanwhile, everyone around me was buying SUVs, moving further and further from work, building lives that required multiple cars... based on the assumption that gas, apparently, was a free and renewable resource.

in the 70s, the average family spent 20% of their income on food. It was down to something like 12% by 2004, thanks to increased factory farming (pig farming was revolutionized in an awful way between 1990 and today, for example) and the new types of crops. But demand is still increasing and productivity is not....
post #69 of 86
I use hotcouponworld. Read this first, and feel free to ask me any questions you may have.

http://www.hotcouponworld.com/forums...cs-newbie.html

I forgot to quote, but this is for the person that asked for pointers on couponing.
post #70 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by savithny View Post

THree years ago, gas around here aws still occasionally available for $1.35/gallon. It had gone up only minimally in 17 years. Meanwhile, everyone around me was buying SUVs, moving further and further from work, building lives that required multiple cars... based on the assumption that gas, apparently, was a free and renewable resource.
Gas isn't going anywhere but up.

When we were looking at apartments, we found fantastic apartments for $589 a month after discounts. Loved it. New construction, good neighborhood, etc. However, it was 30 miles away from downtown. We sat down and figure that it would be...

30x2x2x5 = 600 miles a week. Both of our cars get an average of 25 MPG. So, 600/25 = 24 gallons of gas a week x 4 weeks a month = 96 x $3.50 = $336 month on gas. Let's adjust that to $4 a gallon. $384 on gas a month then. And that is just to get to and from work and uni. That is it. No other driving to the store, no visiting friends, etc. Both of us have too different schedules to carpool.

So we had to say no to those apartments. When all was said and done the final cost was $589 (rent) + $350 (gas estimate) = $939. Instead we chose another set of apartments 4.5 miles away from my work and 10 miles away from my husband's work/uni. So now we are down to 145 miles a week. 145/25 = 5.8 x $3.50 = $20.30 a week or about $81 a month. So our new apartment costs $739 + $81 (gas) = $820. A difference of about $100-$119 when all is said and done. So although it seems more expensive on the face to spend $739 vs $589 for rent, in the end the former was cheaper. Even if gas goes to $4, it is only a difference of about $3. Much, much more manageable.

For what it is worth, there is no real option of finding a cheaper apartment that is also closer to where we need to go.
post #71 of 86
We are actually in a pretty good place. We own our home but bought one we could afford. We have good jobs in industries that are not being hard hit. We could live on DH salary mine is for extras. I have noticed the increase in groceries. I am grateful that we started out young and broke and learned to be frugal.
post #72 of 86
I've definitely noticed it. We are currently paying off all our debt so we can be in an even better place, financially. Groceries have definitely gone up. I've noticed about a 20% increase here. I just need to be a smarter shopper so I don't have to adjust the budget quite yet. I've been doing great with couponing and combining that with sales. This change was an eye opening experience for us. Prior to this we were spending more than we make and it was getting scary. We're now living beneath our means and we know we'll be sitting good.
post #73 of 86
Quote:
Which I don't understand ... because Canada ALWAYS echoes what happens in the states. Why can't people get it that if the 'mericans don't buy it, we don't make it, which means we get laid off and have no money to spend? Straight forward, people. We simply do not have the population to sustain ourselves within the current economic structure (read: globalization...).
under the old economic structure we were almost entirely USA dependant but lately with the rise of commodity/oil/gas/minerals...our dependance on manufacturing isn't as strong - so economies in the west will boom - ontario god pray for us.....The demand for oil/gas/minerals/commodities will continue to be strong..regardless if Americans are buying our oil the chinese or indians will..look at the GDP in the northern territories...I forget which one it was but they had a gdp of 90k per person in 2006....90k = minerals and diamonds...
post #74 of 86
We feel it. I'm not panicked, because both our jobs are steady, we don't carry debt other than our fairly small mortgage on our small house. But because I check prices compulsively, I've noticed that prices, especially for food, has gone up significantly.

I think inflation is underreported. I think we're already in a serious inflationary period and that fact hasn't yet made it into the big news.
post #75 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azuralea View Post
We feel it. I'm not panicked, because both our jobs are steady, we don't carry debt other than our fairly small mortgage on our small house. But because I check prices compulsively, I've noticed that prices, especially for food, has gone up significantly.

I think inflation is underreported. I think we're already in a serious inflationary period and that fact hasn't yet made it into the big news.
Core inflation doesn't include fuel or food prices... that's why inflation doesn't seem to be skyrocketing.

I was watching the Money hour on CNN yesterday. There was an analyst on there whose sole job is to evaluate the economy that said that we are definitely in a recession. He said that core inflation is deceptive. For example, the price of wheat has gone up 2.5 times in the past year, causing prices of anything made with flour to at least double. (More farmers are planting corn for fuel.) Unfortunately, with economics, since it's all a trickle-down effect, often consumers do not see the direct affects until later. It's like having a very rainy spring and not seeing the flood waters rise until fall... and by that time, you've forgotten the rainy spring and you're left wondering why there is a flood now. That's why recessions are so often not identified until they are over. Last summer, wheat production was down but we're only now feeling it because the reserves are running low.

If the government doesn't accurately measure inflation, then they can make it appear that things are better than they actually are.
post #76 of 86
Mostly we are doing better than we were two years ago.

We are currently renting and looking to buy a home, and it has been a huge relief to see some of the home prices in our area soften up a bit and get closer to reality. Interest rates coming down will also save us a lot in the long run on our mortgage.

DH takes the train to work and I have a very short commute, which I usually walk. We live in a very walkable area so we don't have to do a lot of driving for entertainment. So gas hasn't had a huge impact.

DH took a full-time job two years ago after building up his home business, and he has been promoted twice. The business itself is doing better than it was two years ago, and it did fine during the last recession, too. He's basically made himself indispensable there, so barring anything crazy, he won't be laid off.

I'm still working full-time as non-tenure track faculty at a university. Our salaries are pretty insulated from general trends.

I have seen the cost of food rising, but not enough to be hurting us, especially given that we are doing fine with all of the above.
post #77 of 86
we're noticing, especially with gas. dh drives 40 miles each way for work. he uses about $600/month now just on gas for his car. i use about another $100 for gas.
post #78 of 86
The downturn smacked us between the eyes on Feb 1st when my husband was laid off. The lay off is due to the economy. We have also noticed several jobs he has applied for have been cancelled or delayed because of the economy. These are jobs in different parts of the country too. Not local.

We got the kids on Medicaid and are trying desperately to get me on Medicaid before the baby is born.

We did get WIC last week. I noticed when we picked up milk with our WIC voucher it has really jumped in the last week. Its now $3.66 a gallon and was $2.99 a few days before.

Gas is now at $3.19.
post #79 of 86
My husband's company shut down putting over 500 people out of work so yes as one of the newly unemployed, we are definitely feeling it.
post #80 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatWrangler View Post
We did get WIC last week. I noticed when we picked up milk with our WIC voucher it has really jumped in the last week. Its now $3.66 a gallon and was $2.99 a few days before.

Gas is now at $3.19.
I'm sorry for your situation. We're there too and it sucks.
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