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I hide the "Babywise" books - Page 4

post #61 of 70
I turn them backwards on the shelf or refile them far far away from where they belong.
post #62 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
I don't, actually. Can you imagine if someone went to pick up Circle Round and there was a Jack Chick tract in it telling them they were going to hell? I think that's pretty offensive, too. Or a pamphlet on how co-sleeping kills in Nighttime Parenting?
Your hypotheticals illustrate the reason that putting a pamphlet in a book rubs me the wrong way.
post #63 of 70
Just for the sake of argument (because I'm enjoying learning others perspectives on this..) how is hiding books, or keeping bookstore from stocking certain book, not considered censorship? isn't censorship the act of keeping certain materials or information from the public? Thats where it gets fuzzy for me....and thats why, if given the choice of picking up a book with an insert in it... or not being able to pick the book up at all..I find the insert much more desirable.

YET.... when I think about the material i.e. books that tell. oh, 10 ways for adolescent boys to kill their neighbors cat... well, somehow i don't think an insert would be effective....
post #64 of 70
Eh, yeah, the neighbor's cat thing..anyone picking up that book and buying it is too far gone for a pamphlet. I doubt by that point they would even need a book.
post #65 of 70
I work in a library. I've got some thoughts about this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cravenab00 View Post
i hide them at the library, like underneath the shelving units
The library is the one place everyone can go to access any and all information. Your hiding these titles is infringing on someone else's rights to information.

Most libraries I'm familiar with are woefully understaffed. The amount of time it takes to reshelve books is substantial. If you come into our library and want a specific title and our catalog says it is on the shelf, I want to be able to direct you to the book. I don't want you to watch me try to locate the book for half an hour because someone else thought you don't have the right to access it easily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BAU3 View Post
I just have to say that hiding books makes me really uncomfortable. I think the inserts is a great idea, but the thought that other people are hiding literature because they deem it "bad" really bothers me. I think its not our place to decide what people should or shouldn't read.
It is not our place to decide how others gather information and spend their money. I could read Babywise and come to the same conclusion as most of the posters at MDC. It is insulting to assume that women are too small-minded to look at information and make decisions. Putting exactly the right book in a woman's hands doesn't guarantee she'll be the kind of mother you think she should be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaVolpe View Post
It does make more work for the book store but by hiding them their inventory will still show them in stock so they won't reorder any more. Those looking for the book will have a much harder time trying to find them and may find some other book they like better while looking for that one. I know it is more work for the employees but not anything more excessive than what they already have to do to streighten shelves on a daily basis. I used to work at a book store and putting books back in the correct location was a big part of my day. It wasn't as if everyone else puts the books they are looking at back in the right places anyhow.
You're essentially saying that it does make more work for employees but you don't mind because hey, they're supposed to be working! That's their job! And I have an agenda here. I feel triumphant and it comes at the teensy tiny price of making more work for people who don't earn a living wage.

That's selfish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjorker View Post
Please, please, please don't do this. Get the word out in other ways, because all you're doing is harassing a bunch of minimum-wage workers. YOU go work in a bookstore for awhile before you start talking about what is difficult for them to be doing, because at least a few of you clearly have no idea.

I am really upset by some of the things that have been said here. Not to mention that it's just plain immature to go around hiding things that you don't agree with.
Agreed.

There are people in book stores and libraries who care very much about our right to read anything and everything. The people who work in this corner of our lives go to bat for us and stand up to censorship. They want us to be able to judge for ourselves. Scattering their stock hinders their ability to do their job the best they can.

Instead, do it the right way. You do not have a right to hide, deface, destroy, "lose", or steal books. You do have a right to challenge a book. Take a title to the bookseller and voice your concerns. Offer alternatives. Your library should have a procedure for book challenging. It is usually a matter of telling the librarian at the circulation desk and maybe filling out a form.

Please remember that in a library, the books don't belong to the library and they don't belong to just you. They belong to everyone in the community and no one person gets to decide what everyone has access to. That's something we should celebrate and protect.
post #66 of 70
Originally Posted by hattifattener:
"Ha! This thread cracks me up. When I was a book-grunt we had a chronic book-replacer-activist. Her thing was taking the "Historical Male Feminists" book out of the feminist section and replacing it in sections she thought guys were more likely to visit. Like they were going to be converted while shopping for a Volvo manual.

I would just follow her around til she was done, giving her a friendly smile that let her know I would re-shelve the book the *minute* she left the store.

We all must find our satisfaction in life somewhere."

Quote:
Originally Posted by cjanelles View Post
Indeed.
Ummm... Did you think I meant me? Nope. I meant the book-mover's satisfaction. It was win-win: she got the satisfaction of moving the book, I got to keep my section in order. I.e. keep my job and keep eating.
post #67 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hattifattener View Post
Originally Posted by hattifattener:
"Ha! This thread cracks me up. When I was a book-grunt we had a chronic book-replacer-activist. Her thing was taking the "Historical Male Feminists" book out of the feminist section and replacing it in sections she thought guys were more likely to visit. Like they were going to be converted while shopping for a Volvo manual.

I would just follow her around til she was done, giving her a friendly smile that let her know I would re-shelve the book the *minute* she left the store.

We all must find our satisfaction in life somewhere."



Ummm... Did you think I meant me? Nope. I meant the book-mover's satisfaction. It was win-win: she got the satisfaction of moving the book, I got to keep my section in order. I.e. keep my job and keep eating.
I knew what you meant. I didn't think you were talking about yourself.
post #68 of 70

the circle round analogy

I see your point but still, circle round isn't abusive in the slightest and there are not professional organizations against it. I do think Babywise does verge on abusive or neglectful and while maybe hiding the books or inserting pamphlets is overstepping a bit, I also think that the everyday mainstream has promoted ideas such as Babywise so much that this may be one of the only ways to really try to change it. Although i have noticed that magazines such as Parenting have been making positive changes regarding childbirth and preschool options so that is positive.
post #69 of 70
I'm sorry, I don't get it. How is it censorship to move a book to a less-easily-noticed position on a bookshelf, or to put a better book in front of said book, but it's NOT censorship to ask that the book be COMPLETELY REMOVED from the bookstore? O.o

In any case, I do agree that it might be a better idea to ask that the book be removed from the bookstore, except, in my experience, the book store service desk just looks at you like you're crazy and tells you, "Yeah, but lots of people BUY that book, so we have to carry it." End of story. So my next best option is to put the better books where they're more easily accessed and noticed so that people LOOK at them for five seconds before moving on, in the hopes that *maybe* it will catch someone's interest that may not have seen it before.
In theory, I kind of agree with the idea that a pamplet is better in that you might get more information to the target audience, HOWEVER, I've seen what people do to inserts in books... pull them out without even looking at them, and dump them on the floor.

Since it's all a game of marketing, I think it's wise to play the marketing game ourselves. It's called strategic shelf stocking.
post #70 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by saimeiyu View Post
I'm sorry, I don't get it. How is it censorship to move a book to a less-easily-noticed position on a bookshelf, or to put a better book in front of said book, but it's NOT censorship to ask that the book be COMPLETELY REMOVED from the bookstore? O.o
I personally never said anything about censorship. Although my argument would be different if we were talking about libraries. There are huge differences between the two regarding potential censorship issues, and do not think that a library should even consider removing this book. A bookstore is for-profit business and can make up their own mind. It certainly doesn't hurt to speak your mind to someone with authority. In the case of the bigger bookstores, that's NOT going to be anyone that's actually there in the store. The smaller ones will probably be much more receptive, and certainly easier to find a listening ear. That said, everyone has a cause, and if they truly listened to everyone's issue, there would be few books left. I think that's where the question of censorship fits in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saimeiyu View Post
In any case, I do agree that it might be a better idea to ask that the book be removed from the bookstore, except, in my experience, the book store service desk just looks at you like you're crazy and tells you, "Yeah, but lots of people BUY that book, so we have to carry it."
Exactly! Which is why actually addressing the issue with the people and "educating" them (or rather, telling them your opinion) in other ways would be a better choice. And certainly far more effective. It's the people that are the problem, here. People's written words, people's actions and beliefs, word of mouth, etc. If there's less of a demand, then there will be less of the product readily available. You don't change the world by trying to hide a very small piece of the puzzle. I honestly don't believe that sneaking around and making the piece of literature that they're after ever-so-slightly less accessible will make a lick of difference. Not to mention all the other issues that myself and others have brought up.

I also don't agree with putting a few gun shops out of business would be a good method of fighting crime, you know? You could ban guns entirely, and the crime would still exist. You could take away the violent video games, and the crime would still exist. A completely different subject, I know, but the point is that the real issue needs to be addressed, and IMO this is far, far from it, and a complete waste of time and energy for many people.
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