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Did They Play the Radio During Your Cesarean? - Page 2

post #21 of 59
A lot of surgeons like to play CD's when they perform surgery, it helps them relax and helps pass time. I've been in three c-sections (observing as a student) and assisted in one. I would have liked some music on when I assisted it would have been nice.

Thing is, with most surgery's the patient is out so they don't remember the music. I would think they would ask if the music is ok but you never know what offends people. Where I work a lullaby is played overhead every time a baby is born. Some people love it, others are offended and hate it.

Surgery is notorious for being the least personal specialty. After many years staff has a tendency to forget the patient as a person. Some build this up because the patient is always out, some as a defense mechanism so they don't get attached.

Hi I'm rambling today.
post #22 of 59
The guy who did my surgery chatted with dh and I the entire time.

He was a very nice man.
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
Thanks, Christina. I'm a whiner, but I just can't deal with the whole "another day at the office" vibe, especially with "care" provider who knew how upset I was.
I get that I guess it *is* just another day at the office to them, but it is a major deal for you. Seems to me like checking with the patient first would be the thing to do.
post #24 of 59
No music with either of mine. But my first was an emergency situation and my 2nd I got a dirty look from the anesthesiologist and my OB b/c I piped into their conversation about their wives and interior decorating, and how that was something I enjoyed. They just looked at me then said anyway and went back into their conversation. I think that was my biggest deciding factor for a HBA2C. I just will not be in that environment again :
post #25 of 59
I had a whole list of songs I would've liked played in the event I needed a section (I didn't).

Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd topped the list.
If I Just Lay Here (I don't think this is the real name of the song, but it was played AD NAUSEUM last year about this time)

Even now, if I hear these songs on the radio I can't help but think of lying in an OR (which I did need to do for a d&c).

eta - I mean no offense to anyone here. But being prepared in the event I needed a section topped my list. I even asked my OB if he picked the music or if I could.
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by meredyth0315 View Post
No music with either of mine. But my first was an emergency situation and my 2nd I got a dirty look from the anesthesiologist and my OB b/c I piped into their conversation about their wives and interior decorating, and how that was something I enjoyed. They just looked at me then said anyway and went back into their conversation. I think that was my biggest deciding factor for a HBA2C. I just will not be in that environment again :
WOW- great patient care, there : That really would have upset me, too!
Where do these doctors get off treating patients like that??
post #27 of 59
They played music during my section and I thought it was nice. It wasn't the radio it must have been a CD. I only remember one song and it was "What a Wonderful World" I dunno, I thought it was a nice touch. The surgeon talked with me the whole time about baby stuff.

I'm sure if I didn't want it played they would have turned it off.

I really think the hospital experience depends on the individual hospital and doctor, just like everything else.
post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post
In the "Pushed" book, I read about a radio playing in the background during a woman's cesarean. Now I'm hearing anecdotally about women who have experienced the same thing.

I have never had a cesarean, and this is just me speaking. But I think that I would find it somewhat offensive, as though "working on" my uterus were no different than repairing my heating furnace or changing my car's oil. I can't imagine hearing commercials about car sales and fast food or the latest cell phone plan, or hearing some overplayed adult contemporary song . . . all during what should be the sacred and miraculous moment of birth.

Am I making sense here? I'm curious to hear from women who have had this happen.
I read Block's book too, and it was the first time I've read about the cesarean procedure from beginning to end. I imagined myself on the operating table and the potential coldness of the event and how truly traumatic it can be.

As a birth advocate/activist I've spent so much time and energy "against" unnecessary C-sections without really beginning to understand what it must feel like as that mom on the table.

Kinda even makes me feel ungrateful and guilty about being upset over the unnecessary medical interventions in DD's birth.
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by not now View Post
Where I work a lullaby is played overhead every time a baby is born. Some people love it, others are offended and hate it.
Oh they do this where my girls were born and every time I heard the lullaby it brought tears to my eyes - you don't happen to work in Illinois?
post #30 of 59
So I don't qualify but I think it's in the same vein (ignore me if not) while I was birthing my first daughter with the epidural my OB and the nurses stood around chatting about the OBs son and the construction going on around the hospital. I seriously was afraid to push lest I interrupt them. : My OB wasn't even looking at me most of the time. :

ETA- this same OB gave me an episiotomy before I even started pushing.
post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post
Oh they do this where my girls were born and every time I heard the lullaby it brought tears to my eyes - you don't happen to work in Illinois?
Nope, CA.
post #32 of 59
The radio wasn't on when surgery started, but after they got past the first layer or so, and I started FEELING INTENSE PAIN, the anesthesiologist said, "Well, I can't turn the epidural up any higher; it would paralyze your lungs. Would you like me to turn on the radio?" Yeah, she was fairly useless. But we did get KROQ at our request. (Kinda glad it was a Sunday morning; I don't think I was in the mood for Kevin and Bean.) Oh, and the reception was fine in the OR, even though the hospital was built in the early 1970s or something.

The doctors talked to each other about the surgery; it was an attending demonstrating for a resident and an intern, so it was aaaallll business. They talked to me insofar as they needed to to verify that the anesthesia was working (for all the good that rigamarole did us), but from what both my husband and I recall, there was no "table talk" or even non-clinical narration. Maybe they were afraid to say too much, since they knew the gender was a surprise and that we wanted DH to have the honor of announcing.
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post
In the "Pushed" book, I read about a radio playing in the background during a woman's cesarean. Now I'm hearing anecdotally about women who have experienced the same thing.

I have never had a cesarean, and this is just me speaking. But I think that I would find it somewhat offensive, as though "working on" my uterus were no different than repairing my heating furnace or changing my car's oil. I can't imagine hearing commercials about car sales and fast food or the latest cell phone plan, or hearing some overplayed adult contemporary song . . . all during what should be the sacred and miraculous moment of birth.

Am I making sense here? I'm curious to hear from women who have had this happen.

They asked me if I would like any music. I hadnt thought about it up to that point - but I did! However, I had left the music that I wanted in the car! ... lol - Otherwise my son would have been born to Queen! lmao Up to that point thats what he was listening to hehe... But they had a box of music I could choose from - so he was born to classical music - beethoven to be exact
post #34 of 59
They played music in my c-section. If I have another, I'll request music again.

And, I'm an odd one. I like the chit-chat. I have a medical background, and I know that the idle chit-chat means everyone is all relaxed, and everything is going according to plan. Silence would make me ALOT more nervous. ALOT. Because, in my experience, usually silence means things are going wrong, nad everyone needs to concentrate to fix them.

But, I know that I'm a weird one.
post #35 of 59
During a friend's surgery, the nurses were talking about their lunch plans she was really annoyed.
post #36 of 59
No music with mine. With both, I had an anesthesiologist holding one hand and DH the other, and both of them talking to me to help me stay focused and calm. The docs talked to each other, but very quietly so that I couldn't really hear-- I don't know whether it was about the surgery, or about their roommates and where they were doing lunch. It could have been either. But on the whole, everybody was very respectful and attentive to me.
post #37 of 59
I don't think they played music during my section, but I honestly didn't notice. I think unless it was something I hated that I would have appreciated it, some of the instruments sounds and such are a bit disconcerting.

While there wasn't music, there was a lot of talk going on in the room while it was happening, but most of it was toward either me or my husband. I was very fortunate, everybody in the room was very relaxed and kept the atmosphere relaxed and pretty joyous on the whole. There was a lot of laughing, joking and discussion about the baby and a TON of baby weight guessing. After the baby was born there was a lot of talk about the baby and her size. We all talked about names (we were pretty undecided). My anesthesiologist actually took all of our first baby pictures (he had an assistant with him, he didn't abandon his job or anything). My husband was a bit shell-shocked about the whole thing (he's pretty squeamish and was afraid of seeing anything) and would have never thought to take pictures so the extra photography help was great.
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by BetsyS View Post
And, I'm an odd one. I like the chit-chat. I have a medical background, and I know that the idle chit-chat means everyone is all relaxed, and everything is going according to plan. Silence would make me ALOT more nervous. ALOT. Because, in my experience, usually silence means things are going wrong, nad everyone needs to concentrate to fix them. .
To me, being in the OR in the first place means something that gone wrong. There really isn't anything the OR staff can do to put me at ease, because the environment and the experience both terrify me. It gets worse every time. (I'm really scared of having my next one.) Honestly, during both the planned sections, I found myself thinking something would go horribly wrong, and I'd just die...had to remind myself that leaving my babies without a mom wasn't a desirable result (and trust me - it was hard, because I thought they deserved better than mom who didn't have the courage to give birth in the first place).

Besides...imo, everybody freaking "needs to concentrate" when they've got my body cut open in front of them, anyway. I really don't give a crap how routine it is for them. If they want to push women into sections, the least they can do is take them seriously while they're doing them. In fairness, though, the talking when I've been in OR has been all business - but it's bad enough knowing what they're doing to me, without having to listen to them talk about it.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chryseis View Post
After the baby was born there was a lot of talk about the baby and her size.
I never want to hear another word about the size of my babies. The nursing staff got weird about dd and ds2, and it drove me nutty. I also wasn't fond of the "it's a good thing I pushed you - he never could have come out the other way" remark from the OB with ds2. (By "pushing you", he was referring to his threat to drop me from care - made the day before, at 41w, 4d, when I'd been having prodromal labour for over a week.) I'd really like them to shut up about baby size, but I do'nt think they will.
post #40 of 59
I agree with the pp that chit chat is relaxing - for *me* anyway.

I'm a soon to be RN, and I had a planned, very necessary c-section for my last babe.

The radio was on, but it's always on in that OR. They asked if I minded, and it totally didn't matter to me.

I ended up chatting with the anesthesiologist and the OB about their Christmas plans.

The only time things got hazy was when my pressure dropped to about 60/30 and I was blacking out. They pumped me with normal saline and it came right back up.

Very, very big hugs to everyone who had a traumatic experience. gy
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