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How do I grow a nice chubby baby? - Page 3

post #41 of 66
Potty Diva<She isn't just "hoping" for a chunky baby, she is looking for advice to actually go through with getting a chunky baby by changing her normal eating habits into something a body builder would eat.

And oh my, eating all this protein cannot be good for you or your growing baby. Perhaps in trying to get a chunky baby, she may end up with a baby with other special circumstances.>


What??? Aren't there enough studies out that show that high protein from whole food sources is very healthy during pregnancy, helping women carry to term, to support the uterus and to control the mothers blood sugar, and probably the baby's as well? 100 grams is recommended and i've never heard of any negative repercussions from high protein consumption in pregnancy, to the mother or child.



Megan, back to your original question. I'm with you, i feel more comfortable with the larger baby, although my smallest was 7'3" and my 2nd smallest was 7'4" at 36 weeks. it frightened me that she had no butt.

the only thing i've seen in research is fish oil. my last was 8' at 37 weeks and i think it was because of that. this time i'm doing high vitamin cod liver oil. I started out with raw dairy but right now the expense is too much and the kefir is grossing me out. From what i've seen the Brewer diet grows healthy babies, not necessarily fat but solid newborns. one as big as 14 lbs(what!!!) hb and no tears, she was delivered by my mw. my babies have all been average but my mil's were all 10-11 lbs, except for her girl who was 6 lbs. she's 5' and back then wasn't over 100 lbs. so who knows.
post #42 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty Diva View Post
Can I be honest here?

IMO, this wanting a specific kind of baby smells of genetic engineering. If you babe is healthy, no matter what they look like, be happy.
Genetic engineering? Hardly. This discussion has nothing at all to do with genetic engineering or anything like it.

-Angela
post #43 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty Diva View Post
I'm not really interested in how it was received. I did my best to be non-confrontational and still voice a concern.

She isn't just "hoping" for a chunky baby, she is looking for advice to actually go through with getting a chunky baby by changing her normal eating habits into something a body builder would eat.

And oh my, eating all this protein cannot be good for you or your growing baby. Perhaps in trying to get a chunky baby, she may end up with a baby with other special circumstances.

My daughter is calling for me now, but, I'll be bock.
huh? Eating habits are not genetic engineering at all. I think perhaps you're unclear on what genetic engineering IS.

And from what basis do you say a diet high in protein can't be good for mom or baby? Some of the most well supported research out there shows that pregnant moms should have a diet quite high in protein to support a healthy pregnancy.

-Angela
post #44 of 66


you'll grow what you grow. In my experience what you eat or don't has LITTLE to do with it. My babies have always been good weights for their gestational age and I've had 3 hyperemesis pregnancies (though #2 wasn't nearly as hard as #1 and #3!). DH was a 4lb 34 weeker and I was a 6lb 10oz 37 weeker and yet my youngest was 8lb 10oz and I'm sure should this boy make it to term he'll be at least 10lbs.
post #45 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
huh? Eating habits are not genetic engineering at all. I think perhaps you're unclear on what genetic engineering IS.

And from what basis do you say a diet high in protein can't be good for mom or baby? Some of the most well supported research out there shows that pregnant moms should have a diet quite high in protein to support a healthy pregnancy.

-Angela
ITA with this. eating lots of protein during pregnancy is beneficial in so many ways. i'm a little confused that someone is saying otherwise.
post #46 of 66
Well, according to the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery, eating too much protein can actually lead to LOW birthweight babies.

Maybe more well-rounded searching would be in order.
post #47 of 66
And I didn't say THIS was genetic engineering (good grief) but that this want or desire or ACTION to create the baby we "want" sounds a little like those who participate in genetic engineering.
post #48 of 66
I'd recommend the Brewer diet. It will at least keep you healthy. I think the weight of your baby has more to do with genetics and you seem to have smaller babies so I'm not sure there's a lot you can do to have a bigger baby. GL.

www.blueribbonbaby.org

ETA: As a fitness professional, super high amounts of protein (think Atkins) can be bad for your liver since that's where it's metabolized. The human body just wasn't meant to digest only proteins or proteins in unbalanced amounts. It's all about balance. Anywhere from 70-100g per day is what is suggested by most birth professionals (Bradley instructors, doulas, MW's).
post #49 of 66
I third the Brewer's Diet. It's a very healthy diet for pg moms and ime, it produces big babies often.

Happy Birthin'
post #50 of 66
Even though they won't put on the huge amounts some OBs like to scare women with, if you go to 40 weeks your baby should gain another half pound or so beyond what you've seen at 38 weeks.


I've seen one article mentioning a study that showed a correlation between a high sugar diet and macrosomic babies. But that's definitely a bad idea.
post #51 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
I've seen one article mentioning a study that showed a correlation between a high sugar diet and macrosomic babies. But that's definitely a bad idea.
Yes! Definitely! Though I do love a little chocolate when I can get it. I was so sick after Christmas that I didn't eat the expensive chocolate dh got me for my stocking. A few weeks ago I was feeling well enough to polish it off though!
post #52 of 66
My two babies who were just over 6 lbs were very aggressive nursers with strong latches while my two babies who were just under 8 lbs were sleepy and lazy nursers. With my last baby I drank raw milk, took fish oil and ate eggs every day for breakfast. . .and she weighed 6lbs 5oz at 38.5 weeks.

My vote is genetics over diet.
post #53 of 66
My first baby weighed 11 lb, 14 oz. No diabetes. I did have pretty intense morning sickness wiht him throughout most of the pregnancy. The only thing that tasted good was Ramen.

So, bring on the Ramen noodles! Cheap and it'll grow a humongous baby.
post #54 of 66
I'm sorry but this is a little weird. I got totally flamed for saying it made me uncomfortable for people to want to grow a smaller baby, but how is it ok for everyone to jump all over the OP for wanting a bigger baby? Not getting that.

I think a lot of it has to do with your genes. And from the looks of when your dc were born, maybe their gestational age, too. My ds was a full pound smaller than my three girls (all over 8 lbs) when he was born 4-5 weeks premature. AND I ate significantly less with him due to financial reasons so he would have been at least 8lbs at birth if he were term with a very low calorie diet.

IME, bigger babies are healthier. But maybe it's b/c ds was sickly at 7lbs, I was sickly at 6lbs something (and overdue!), and everyone I know IRL with babies under 7.5 lbs have medical problems?

I would check out the Brewer diet for a full, rounded pg diet to get enough protein and keep away swelling and hypertension at the same time.
post #55 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Megan~ View Post
Okay. Well, I do eat obviously but what I'm looking for is X grams of protein or something like that.

so many of the mothers on here have nice big babies and I'm wondering why that happens. It seems that mdc members are more likely than the general public to have a 9lb baby (perhaps that's because they are less likely to induce early?)
A lot of the moms here are relaxed about going past their due dates, which can fatten babies up quite a bit. You delivered early, and the birth weights seem reasonable to me given the gestations. I think the main concern if you really want larger babies would be to get to 40 weeks. A 9 pound 36 weeker would not be a good thing.
post #56 of 66
Seems like we're all a little off topic. To grow a healthy baby, you need as close to zero refined sugars as possible and plenty else of the components of a healthy diet: 70-100 g protein, lots of fresh veggies, whole grains and some complex carbs.

OP- sounds like you're already doing a good job, avoiding the ice cream, etc.

My first was over 8# and my comment when he was born was "check out those muscles" and same for dd. My focus remained on cutting out refined sugars, as that is my personal weakness. (though I too love the good chocolate, I can eat small bits of it and not go overboard- not true for other goodies)

Good for you for thinking about your nutrition! That says a lot already about your success.
post #57 of 66
I'm a little confused why smaller babies are somehow seen as unhealthy and likely to have latch and sleepiness issues. Why not make your goal to eat a healthy diet instead of focusing on the weight of your baby? If you eat healthy foods, you'll be more likely to make it to term, and thus avoid the latch and sleepiness issues you've described.

For the record, I had zero morning sickness with both of my pregnancies. I ate plenty of healthy foods, including plenty of protien. I gained 22lbs with my first and closer to 30lbs with my second. First baby was born 6lbs 9oz at 41w2d weeks and my second was 6lbs 1oz at 42w1d. Both perfectly healthy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Megan~ View Post
Not wanting to pick a fight but...

Perhaps its all in how we take it but I certainly didn't mean to imply that chubby babies are cuter. I just want to grow a healthy one and I do tend to think that bigger babies, at least those that grow that way naturally not because of GD, are healthier. Maybe its a misconception of mine though.
Yes, it's a misconception. And quite frankly, I find it a bit insulting to imply that there's something wrong with small babies (and really 6lbs isn't terribly small, even at full-term) and that the mother could/should have done something to prevent it.

Average for Gestational Age (AGA) is birth weight that falls between the 10th percentile and 90th percentile of birth weights. Even my 6lb1oz little guy was tagged as being AGA. Being in the 10th percentile is no less healthy than being in the 90th percentile. Obviously you want to avoid SGA and LGA babies, but anything in between is perfectly normal (and healthy!)
post #58 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazydiamond View Post
I'm a little confused why smaller babies are somehow seen as unhealthy and likely to have latch and sleepiness issues. Why not make your goal to eat a healthy diet instead of focusing on the weight of your baby? If you eat healthy foods, you'll be more likely to make it to term, and thus avoid the latch and sleepiness issues you've described.

For the record, I had zero morning sickness with both of my pregnancies. I ate plenty of healthy foods, including plenty of protien. I gained 22lbs with my first and closer to 30lbs with my second. First baby was born 6lbs 9oz at 41w2d weeks and my second was 6lbs 1oz at 42w1d. Both perfectly healthy.




Yes, it's a misconception. And quite frankly, I find it a bit insulting to imply that there's something wrong with small babies (and really 6lbs isn't terribly small, even at full-term) and that the mother could/should have done something to prevent it.

Average for Gestational Age (AGA) is birth weight that falls between the 10th percentile and 90th percentile of birth weights. Even my 6lb1oz little guy was tagged as being AGA. Being in the 10th percentile is no less healthy than being in the 90th percentile. Obviously you want to avoid SGA and LGA babies, but anything in between is perfectly normal (and healthy!)
I agree with you here. Average babies are between 6 and 10 lbs. One isn't better than the other when we are talking about a healthy, non-induced, full term pregnancy. (38-42 weeks, everyone cooks at a different speed) Genetics do play a big part. I am the tallest female in both sides of the family. I am only 5'4". Most of the women are very small framed. All women were born with lower weights, I was the fattest at a whole 6 lb 6 oz. I really couldnt expect a big baby girl of my own. I ate well and gained well. She was 5 lb 13 oz.

Like I said before, my little baby ( 5 lb 13 oz) who was early is healthier than my bigger (8 lb 7 oz) baby who was right on time.
post #59 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonglowmama View Post
To grow a healthy baby, you need as close to zero refined sugars as possible and plenty else of the components of a healthy diet: 70-100 g protein, lots of fresh veggies, whole grains and some complex carbs.
: I agree with this. Megan-have you thought about making a daily food log? I think that would help in seeing what food areas you might be lacking/not lacking etc. You could bring it in at your next prenatal appt to discuss.
post #60 of 66
Meagan:

I just wanted to say that I think I know where you're coming from. Whether or not it is a misconception, I know that in my head, when I see my baby (coming soon, yay!) I see her as not huge...but with baby rolls. It pleases me to think of her coming out plump and looking "well fed". Even though I KNOW I'm feeding my baby well...my midwife and I agree that this baby girl I'm carrying is going to be a peanut. Long, but small probably.

I know that I am hung up on how my diet was for the first half of my pregnancy....I was soooooo sick, I lost about 18 pounds and it was all I could do to stay hydrated! I was truly miserable and had broken blood vessels all over my face the whole time from doing basically nothing but projectile vomitting. I know that deep in my heart, I feel like maybe I failed my baby and I sometimes worry that maybe I hurt her, or that she will be scrapy and scrawny when she is born....BUT:

Then I remind myself that my mother is an Amazon woman who fed herself like a champion, excersized and rested well during pregnancy and gave birth to four babies naturally (without induction, etc) at term or beyond and that all four of us were peanut babies (6#9oz - 7#) and that we were some of the healthiest babies around. Plus, we were all so beautiful...we were long and thin...and just as pretty as the big rolly babies. When I think about it this way, it reminds me that as long as I know I ate as well as I could, I can trust that my body took from me and gave to my baby everything that she needed.

I trust my body and I trust my baby....I know she will come out long and thin just like I did, just like DH did...and she will be healthy and happy. Then, I will stick her on the boob and give her some of those baby rolls! Don't worry, you sound like you're doing a fine job!! but I know what you mean about wanting to have a rolly baby...in magazines and on tv, we always see rolly babies and I think it makes our brains think that rolly = well fed. I'm a tall skinny woman, I am very well fed, but I don't have rolls...my genetics are such that I am meant to be tall and skinny....I think really, that it the same with babies!! Keep up the good work momma, you're doing fine.

(I do agree with the high protien diets though...I make sure to get tons of it and it keeps my blood sugar nice and even...I don't get hte crazy-hungries and rarely feel light headed or woozy from dropping blood sugar!)
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